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Topic: Pacemakers

American Heart Association says Former NFL Players may face higher risk of Atrial Fibrillation

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Former National Football League players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AFib) compared to men of similar age who did not play professional football, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Former NFL athletes had lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and had lower resting heart rates compared to the control group, yet the incidence of atrial fibrillation was still higher. (American Heart Association)

Former NFL athletes had lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and had lower resting heart rates compared to the control group, yet the incidence of atrial fibrillation was still higher. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Pacemaker function may be impacted by Electric Appliances; Tools

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Electromagnetic interferences with pacemakers in everyday life can occur, however, harmful interferences are rare using vendors’ recommended device settings,” said Andreas Napp, M.D., study author and cardiologist at RWTH Aachen University Hospital in Aachen, Germany. “Dedicated device programming is an effective measure to reduce the individual risk of interference. For example, doctors can reprogram pacemakers to a lower sensitivity to reduce EMF susceptibility.” 

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats. (American Heart Association)

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats. (American Heart Association)

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Short episodes of Abnormal Heart Rhythm may not increase Risk of Stroke according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience only short episodes of an abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation have a very low risk of stroke, suggesting that anticoagulants in this group of patients were not likely to reduce the risk for stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common abnormal heart rhythm, affecting approximately 2.7 million Americans.

People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience short episodes an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation have no higher risk for stroke or other medical complications than people without documented atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience short episodes an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation have no higher risk for stroke or other medical complications than people without documented atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says new recommendations green-light some Athletes with Heart Disease to compete

 

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time, joint recommendations may permit participation in competitive sports for some athletes diagnosed with a specific type of irregular heartbeat and for others who have an implanted medical device that regulates the heart’s rhythm.

The joint American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology scientific statement published in both the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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Technique to stimulate heart cells may lead to light-controlled Pacemakers

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new technique that stimulates heart muscle cells with low-energy light raises the possibility of a future light-controlled pacemaker, researchers reported in Circulation: Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology, a journal of the American Heart Association.

“Electronic cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators are well established and successful technologies, but they are not without problems, including the breakage of metal leads, limited battery life and interference from strong magnetic fields,” said Emilia Entcheva, Ph.D., senior author of the study and associate professor of biomedical engineering at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York. “Eventually, optical stimulation may overcome some of these problems and offer a new way of controlling heart function.” «Read the rest of this article»

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