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Marsha Blackburn Report: This Week From Washington – February 25th, 2019

 

Senator Marsha Blackburn

Tennessee

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – Our new Nashville Office will open on March 1st.

I am thrilled to announce we will open our new Nashville office on March 1st.  The address will be 3322 West End Avenue, Suite 610, Nashville TN 37203.  It will be the sixth and final office we open in Tennessee. 

The opening of the Nashville office will complete our in-state set-up. We are the first of the freshmen U.S. Senate offices to have all of our state offices up and running.  Since being sworn in on January 3rd, we have been working each and every day to serve Tennesseans across the state. 

Senator Marsha Blackburn.

Senator Marsha Blackburn.

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Instant Peay Play: Kristen Stucker’s Volleyball career is APSU Hall of Fame worthy

 

Instant Peay Play - APSU SportsClarksville, TN – Although the Austin Peay State University (APSU) volleyball team lost in the finals of the Ohio Valley Conference championship tournament Saturday, November 17th and more than likely ended the career of Governors senior setter Kristen Stucker, she will leave behind what must be considered a first-ballot Austin Peay Athletics Hall of Fame career.

ASPU Volleyball senior setter Kristen Stucker.

ASPU Volleyball senior setter Kristen Stucker.

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NASA Study suggests decreased Hydroxyl levels maybe the cause of recent Methane increases

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new NASA- and the U.S. Department of Energy-funded study finds that recent increases in global methane levels observed since 2007 are not necessarily due to increasing emissions, but instead may be due to changes in how long methane remains in the atmosphere after it is emitted.

The second most important human-produced greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, methane is colorless, odorless and can be hard to track. The gas has a wide range of sources, from decomposing biological material to leaks in natural gas pipelines.

Rice paddy fields in India. Agriculture is one source of global methane emissions. (Flickr user sandeepachetan.com travel (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

Rice paddy fields in India. Agriculture is one source of global methane emissions. (Flickr user sandeepachetan.com travel (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

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NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts selects 22 proposals for advancement

 

Written by Andrew Good
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A mechanical rover inspired by a Dutch artist. A weather balloon that recharges its batteries in the clouds of Venus.

These are just two of the five ideas that originated at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and are advancing for a new round of research funded by the agency.

In total, the space agency is investing in 22 early-stage technology proposals that have the potential to transform future human and robotic exploration missions, introduce new exploration capabilities, and significantly improve current approaches to building and operating aerospace systems.

PL's AREE rover for Venus is just one of the concepts selected by NASA for further research funding. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

PL’s AREE rover for Venus is just one of the concepts selected by NASA for further research funding. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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2016 Legislative Session of the 109th Tennessee General Assembly report

 

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

Tennessee State Representative - District 68Nashville, TN – The 109th Tennessee General Assembly adjourned on April 22nd, 2016 to become a part of Tennessee history with passage of major legislation to reduce crime, cut tax burdens, spur job growth, accelerate the state’s success in K-12 education, boost the number of college graduates, curb drug abuse and curtail drunk driving.

State lawmakers also passed significant legislation to ease traffic congestion, reduce child abuse, aid farmers, increase access to healthcare and medication, increase voter participation and provide a safer environment for the elderly.

Following, please find a copy of some of the highlights of this year’s legislative action.

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

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Former APSU Agriculture students honor Dr. Gaines Hunt with endowed scholarship

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Local farmers call him “Doc,” but don’t let the informal nickname fool you. Whenever they see Dr. Gaines Hunt, retired Austin Peay State University (APSU) professor of Agriculture, the word “Doc” sounds oddly formal.

“It’s a nickname, yes, but also a term of endearment and used with the highest level of admiration and respect,” Steve Settle, a Montgomery County farmer and former student of Hunt’s, said. “Each and every one of his students—myself included—will attest that we are better people, better leaders and better able to serve our chosen professions because of his influence in our lives.”

The campus of Austin Peay State University. (APSU)

The campus of Austin Peay State University. (APSU)

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Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam’s Focus Act passes House

 

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

Tennessee State Representative - District 68Nashville, TN – After much debate, the House passed out the Focus Act, one of the Tennessee Governor’s initiatives in his Drive to 55 program.

The FOCUS Act, which is part of Governor Bill Haslam’s legislative priorities, includes: A sharpened focus by Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) on the state’s 13 community and 27 technical colleges;

Creation of local boards for Austin Peay State University, East Tennessee State University, Middle Tennessee State University, Tennessee State University, Tennessee Technological University and the University of Memphis;

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

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NASA experiments with growing Crops in Space has provided benefits on Earth

 

NASA Kennedy Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationKennedy Space Center, FL – The six astronauts currently living on the International Space Station (ISS) have become the first people to eat food grown in space. The fresh red romaine lettuce that accompanied the crew’s usual freeze-dried fare, however, is far from the first crop grown on a space station.

For decades, NASA and other agencies have experimented with plants in space, but the results were always sent to Earth for examination, rather than eaten.

A number of technologies NASA has explored for these space-farming experiments also have returned to Earth over the years and found their way onto the market.

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America’s Farmers Grow Ag Leaders launches in Tennessee; Scholarships available

 

Scholarship program promotes careers in agriculture across 40 states

Americas FarmersSt. Louis, MO – America’s Farmers Grow Ag Leaders is now launching in 40 states, with more than $500,000 worth of scholarships available. Sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, the program provides $1,500 college scholarships to students pursuing a degree related to agriculture.

Starting now, high school seniors and college students in Tennessee and other eligible states can apply for this opportunity.

Farmers know the rewards of a career in agriculture, but many of today’s youth may not. Luckily, there is an abundance of evidence that agriculture is a smart career choice. «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite to help Farmers manage Drought conditions

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – About 60 percent of California is experiencing “exceptional drought,” the U.S. Drought Monitor’s most dire classification. The agency issued the same warning to Texas and the southeastern United States in 2012. California’s last two winters have been among the driest since records began in 1879. Without enough water in the soil, seeds can’t sprout roots, leaves can’t perform photosynthesis, and agriculture can’t be sustained.

Currently, there is no ground- or satellite-based global network monitoring soil moisture at a local level. Farmers, scientists and resource managers can place sensors in the ground, but these only provide spot measurements and are rare across some critical agricultural areas in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

For several months, California has been in a state of "exceptional drought." The state's usually verdant Central Valley produces one-sixth of the U.S.'s crops. (White House via Wikimedia Commons)

For several months, California has been in a state of “exceptional drought.” The state’s usually verdant Central Valley produces one-sixth of the U.S.’s crops. (White House via Wikimedia Commons)

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