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Topic: fires

NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument observes California Wildfires’ Carbon Monoxide output

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard the Aqua satellite, captured carbon monoxide plumes coming from California wildfires last week. There were 28 major wildfires burning across the state as of September 14th, 2020. This includes the August Complex Fire, which started on August 17th and has since burned over 471,000 acres, making it the largest fire on record in California.

The animation shows three-day averages of carbon monoxide concentrations around 3 miles (5 kilometers) up in the atmosphere between September 6th and September 14th.

This visualization shows a three-day average of carbon monoxide concentrations from Sept. 6 to 14

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NASA projects examine COVID-19 and it’s effects on the Environment

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – While scientists around the world are confined to their homes during the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic, Earth observing satellites continue to orbit and send back images that reveal connections between the pandemic and the environment. “Satellites collect data all the time and don’t require us to go out anywhere,” Hannah Kerner, an assistant research professor at the University of Maryland in College Park, said.

Kerner is among eight researchers recently awarded a rapid-turnaround project grant, which supports investigators as they explore how COVID-19 Coronavirus lockdown measures are impacting the environment and how the environment can affect how the virus is spread.

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the meandering Mississippi River, the largest river system in North America in this Landsat image. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the meandering Mississippi River, the largest river system in North America in this Landsat image. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office says Keep Halloween Fire-Safe and Fun by Following Simple Safety Tips

 

Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO)

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – The Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) says Jack-o’-lanterns, decorative candles, and so-called “haunted houses” are all Halloween traditions.

Unfortunately, all those traditions carry risks that could result in injuries or a fatality. According to data from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), decorations are the first thing to ignite in 900 reported home fires each year. Two of every five of these fires were started by a candle.

Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office says Candles Start Nearly Two of Every Five Decoration Fires.

Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office says Candles Start Nearly Two of Every Five Decoration Fires.

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office Says Leave Fireworks to the Experts this Fourth of July

 

Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO)

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Ahead of the Fourth of July holiday, the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) is raising awareness of the dangers posed by consumer fireworks and urging Tennesseans to leave the fireworks to the pros instead of risking their lives and possibly breaking the law by detonating fireworks themselves.

“July Fourth is a great opportunity to celebrate our nation’s independence with friends and family,” said State Fire Marshal and Commerce and Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak. “The best way to ensure you and your loved ones have a safe Fourth is to join other community members in attending public fireworks displays put on by trained and licensed professionals.”

Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office reports that Consumer Fireworks Caused $1M in Damages, One Death and 412 Unintended Fires from 2013-2017

Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office reports that Consumer Fireworks Caused $1M in Damages, One Death and 412 Unintended Fires from 2013-2017

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NASA says Wet Winters May Not Dampen Small Wildfires

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA scientists conducting research on the connection between fuel moisture and fires have uncovered a paradox: a wet winter corresponds to more small wildfires in the following fire season, not fewer, as is commonly assumed. Large fires behave more “logically,” with fewer large fires after a wet winter and more after a dry one.

“This is the most surprising result from our study, because we would expect small fires to follow suit with larger fires,” said Daniel Jensen, a Ph.D. candidate at UCLA who worked on the project under the direction of scientist J.T. Reager of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. When there is ample moisture for plant growth, Jensen pointed out, “It seems that the buildup of fuel content alone causes there to be more fires — but not necessarily more devastating fires.”

A wet winter allows grasses to grow profusely, but during the next fire season, the abundant dried grass fuels more small wildfires. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Carol Rasmussen)

A wet winter allows grasses to grow profusely, but during the next fire season, the abundant dried grass fuels more small wildfires. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Carol Rasmussen)

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal says Misuse of Electric Cords Can Lead to Fires

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Electricity helps make our lives easier, but there are times when we can take its power and its potential for fire-related hazards for granted.

The Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) reminds Tennesseans that the dangers of electrical hazards are always present and warns of common hazards such as overloaded electrical outlets, arcing, and extension cords.

According to SFMO data, electrical wiring, outlets, cords and plugs accounted for 9.51 percent of all structure fires and 14.38 percent of all structure fire deaths in Tennessee between 2012 and 2016.

According to SFMO data, electrical wiring, outlets, cords and plugs accounted for 9.51 percent of all structure fires and 14.38 percent of all structure fire deaths in Tennessee between 2012 and 2016.

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office says Don’t Forget Smoke Alarm Batteries When You ‘Fall Back’ This Weekend

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Get an extra hour of sleep this weekend when you “fall back” for daylight savings time, but keep your peace of mind all year long by changing the batteries in your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Tennesseans should turn their clocks backward one hour on Sunday, November 1st, 2015 at 2:00am.

“Even alarms that are hard-wired should have their batteries replaced regularly and should be tested monthly to ensure they are providing the proper protection,” State Fire Marshal and Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance (TDCI) Julie Mix McPeak said. “Use the extra hour we gain this weekend to make sure your home and family are fire-safe.”

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office shares Safety Tips for Outdoor Grilling

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Summertime is the peak season for outdoor grilling and grilling fires. This year, the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office urges outdoor cooks to keep fire safety in mind as they start up the grill this summer.

From 2010-2014, Tennessee fire departments responded to 204 fires involving grills, hibachis or barbeques. Those fires resulted in two civilian injuries, two firefighter injuries and $5.9 million in property damage, according to the Tennessee Fire Incident Reporting System (TFIRS).

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NASA and U.S. Forest Service maps used to help recovery from California Megafires

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – New maps of two recent California megafires that combine unique data sets from the U.S. Forest Service and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are answering some of the urgent questions that follow a huge wildfire: In all the acres of blackened landscape, where are the live trees to provide seed and regrow the forest? Which dead trees could endanger workers rebuilding roads and trails? What habitats have been created for fire-dependent wildlife species?

The maps, so detailed that they show individual trees, cover the areas of two California megafires — the 2013 Rim fire, which burned more than 250,000 acres (1,000 square kilometers) near and in Yosemite National Park, and 2014’s very intense King fire near Lake Tahoe — before, during and after the active burns.

The 2013 Rim fire in and near Yosemite National Park, California, was the third largest in the state's history, burning more than 250,000 acres. Almost two years later, forest restoration efforts are still ongoing. (USFS/Mike McMillan)

The 2013 Rim fire in and near Yosemite National Park, California, was the third largest in the state’s history, burning more than 250,000 acres. Almost two years later, forest restoration efforts are still ongoing. (USFS/Mike McMillan)

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal says Candle Fires are Preventable

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Decorative and fragranced candles are popular décor in many homes, especially during the winter months. However, candles have caused significant loss of life, injury and property damage when used improperly. On the heels of this winter’s dangerous ice storm, the State Fire Marshal’s Office reminds Tennesseans to always use candles with care.

“From 2009 to 2013, Tennessee fire departments responded to 464 home structure fires that were started by candles,” said Julie Mix McPeak, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance. “These fires caused nine deaths, 28 injuries and $10.38 million in direct property damage, all of which could have been prevented with just a few cautionary steps.”

Candle Fires are preventable

Candle Fires are preventable

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