Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Habitat

NASA says Future Homes on Moon, Mars Could Be Made of Fungi

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMountain View, CA – Science fiction often imagines our future on Mars and other planets as run by machines, with metallic cities and flying cars rising above dunes of red sand. But the reality may be even stranger – and “greener.”

Instead of habitats made of metal and glass, NASA is exploring technologies that could grow structures out of fungi to become our future homes in the stars, and perhaps lead to more sustainable ways of living on Earth as well.

A researcher holding a petri dish containing mycelia – the underground threads that make up the main part of a fungus – growing in simulated martian soil, also known as martian regolith. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Lynn Rothschild)

A researcher holding a petri dish containing mycelia – the underground threads that make up the main part of a fungus – growing in simulated martian soil, also known as martian regolith. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Lynn Rothschild)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA scientists study Aerogel for building habitats on Mars

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The Red Planet is an inhospitable world. NASA says growing crops on Mars is far easier in science fiction than it will be in reality. Among other challenges, subzero temperatures mean water can persist on the surface only as ice, and the planet’s atmosphere offers little protection to plants (or people) from the Sun’s radiation.

Raising crops on Mars is far easier in science fiction than it will be in real life: The Red Planet is an inhospitable world. Among other challenges, subzero temperatures mean water can persist on the surface only as ice, and the planet’s atmosphere offers little protection to plants (or people) from the Sun’s radiation.

Scientists are exploring how aerogel, a translucent, Styrofoam-like material, could be used as a building material on Mars. Aerogel retains heat; structures built with it could raise temperatures enough to melt water ice on the Martian surface. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Scientists are exploring how aerogel, a translucent, Styrofoam-like material, could be used as a building material on Mars. Aerogel retains heat; structures built with it could raise temperatures enough to melt water ice on the Martian surface. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County taking applications for homeowner program

 

Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County TennesseeClarksville, TN – Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County Tennessee is currently accepting applications for its homeowner program. Executive director Shelby Logsdon said the non-profit Christian organization’s mission is to provide “a hand up, not a hand out” by partnering with qualified families to provide decent, safe, affordable housing.

Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County Tennessee

Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Native Plants in Urban Yards Offer Birds “Mini-Refuges”

 

The National Science FoundationPhoenix, AZ – Yards with plants that mimic native vegetation offer birds “mini-refuges” and help to offset losses of biodiversity in cities, according to results of a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

“Native” yards support birds better than those with traditional grass lawns and non-native plantings.

Researchers conducted the study through the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, one of 26 such sites around the globe in ecosystems from coral reefs to deserts, from forests to grasslands.

A xeric, or desert, yard in Phoenix: This yard with native vegetation is a mini-refuge for birds. (Susannah Lerman/University of Massachusetts-Amherst)

A xeric, or desert, yard in Phoenix: This yard with native vegetation is a mini-refuge for birds. (Susannah Lerman/University of Massachusetts-Amherst)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

Audubon holds Christmas bird count; evidence of decline, habitat loss noted

 

co-binoculars-large.jpegA little known spy group in Clarksville meets twice a year at Shoney’s before the crack of dawn. When their plotting is done they leave at sunrise in several vehicles and drive to different areas of town. During the day they drive and walk every bit of their area and using spyglasses (binoculars) they jot down notes about their victims’ private lives. Some of these spies have been operating this secret mission for years and are really good at finding what they are looking for. “It’s like fishing in a way,” says Elaine Faust. “You are always anxious to see what’s around the next corner, by the next tree or in the next field. Sometimes you see things that aren’t supposed to be there and that’s really exciting.”

At the end of the day they celebrate their hard work and discoveries by sharing a dinner of chili. The notes collected there disclose nasty secrets that we may not want to know.

These spies are members of the Audubon society; they have acquired the ability to quickly recognize different types of birds and jot down how many they see. Twice a year, in December and in May, Audubon members gather to do an eight-hour count of birds in this area. Audubon member Amy Wallace says that the Christmas bird count (CBC) is so-named to counter an old tradition of hunters killing as many birds as they can before Christmas. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events, News | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Now playing at the Movies