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Topic: Nobel Prize

Let Me Sow Light, Where There Is Darkness

 

This is the fifth and final of a series of articles based on the prayer of St. Francis of Assisi beginning, “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.”

St. Francis of Assisi

St. Francis of Assisi

Clarksville, TN – Many small children are afraid of the dark. “Scare me! Scare me!” usually results in a story in which darkness plays a role. Amazingly, a night light can help avoid extreme fear during the night. A dimmer switch on the night light can be over time lowered until the fear is overcome.

Somehow the idea that something sinister is lurking as soon as the lights go out is a common fear. With the number of terrifying movies and television programs that many children are being allowed to watch these days, it is amazing that many of them can even go to sleep!

As a teacher, I am flabbergasted when the children, ages five to 11, begin to tell me that they have seen Freddy Krueger, scenes from the Texas Chainsaw Massacre, etc. The nightmares that follow lead one to believe that parental neglect in choosing appropriate entertainment can affect a child throughout life.

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NASA researchers prepare to create Coldest Spot in the Universe inside International Space Station

 

Written by Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Everyone knows that space is cold. In the vast gulf between stars and galaxies, the temperature of gaseous matter routinely drops to 3 degrees K, or 454 degrees below zero Fahrenheit.

It’s about to get even colder.

NASA researchers are planning to create the coldest spot in the known universe inside the International Space Station.

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

APSU student Chris Hayes spends summer at famed CERN laboratory

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – When Austin Peay State University student Chris Hayes returned to Clarksville last summer, after spending nine weeks at the famed CERN laboratory in Switzerland, his friends and professors asked him what he thought of Europe.

“I said, ‘Well, I think it looks a lot like East Tennessee, except that the signs are in French,” he said. “It felt very much like I was at home.”

APSU student Chris Hayes stands next to the CMS detector, which is part of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland.

APSU student Chris Hayes stands next to the CMS detector, which is part of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland.

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Sections: Education | No Comments
 


Down with the Good Ol’ Boys Liquor Store Law

 

It’s Time to Repeal Clarksville’s Good Ol’ Boys’ Liquor Store Permit Law

Liquor StoreClarksville, TN – The Tennessean recently reported that certain folks in Clarksville are questioning the merit of having a limit of only a dozen liquor stores that can be allowed to legally operate in Clarksville at any one time.

The out-dated fifty-year-old city ordinance has created an artificial market for “certificates of compliance,” not to mention creating in the local liquor market an oligopoly (the market condition that exists when there are few sellers, as a result of which they can greatly influence price and other market factors).

Both the local liquor oligopoly and the market for “certificates of compliance” hurt Clarksville’s local economy. «Read the rest of this article»

 

NASA reports International Space Station may have detected signs of Dark Matter

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In science fiction, finding antimatter on board your spaceship is not good news. Usually, it means you’re moments away from an explosion.

In real life, though, finding antimatter could lead to a Nobel Prize.

On April 3rd, researchers led by Nobel Laureate Samuel Ting of MIT announced that the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a particle detector operating onboard the International Space Station since 2011, has counted more than 400,000 positrons, the antimatter equivalent of electrons.  There’s no danger of an explosion, but the discovery is sending shock waves through the scientific community.

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NASA reports astronomers use Suzaku Satellite to gain better understanding of Supernovas

 

Written by Francis Reddy
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – An exploding star observed in 1604 by the German astronomer Johannes Kepler held a greater fraction of heavy elements than the sun, according to an analysis of X-ray observations from the Japan-led Suzaku satellite.

The findings will help astronomers better understand the diversity of type Ia supernovae, an important class of stellar explosion used in probing the distant universe.

This composite of images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of Kepler's supernova in low (red), intermediate (green) and high-energy (blue) X-rays. The background is an optical star field taken from the Digitized Sky Survey. The distance to the object is uncertain, with estimates ranging from 13,000 to 23,000 light-years, but recent studies favor the maximum range. This image spans 12 arcminutes or about 80 light-years at the greatest distance. *Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NCSU/M.Burkey et al.; optical: DSS)

This composite of images from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of Kepler’s supernova in low (red), intermediate (green) and high-energy (blue) X-rays. The background is an optical star field taken from the Digitized Sky Survey. The distance to the object is uncertain, with estimates ranging from 13,000 to 23,000 light-years, but recent studies favor the maximum range. This image spans 12 arcminutes or about 80 light-years at the greatest distance. *Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NCSU/M.Burkey et al.; optical: DSS)

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NASA reports data from Planck Spacecraft reveals Universe Older than previously thought

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Europe’s Planck spacecraft has obtained the most accurate and detailed map ever made of the oldest light in the universe. The map results suggest the universe is expanding more slowly than scientists thought, and is 13.8 billion years old, 100 million years older than previous estimates.

The data also show there is less dark energy and more matter in the universe than previously known.

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NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to lead U.S. Science Team to study Dark Energy and Dark Matter

 

Written by Whitney Clavin
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The European Space Agency (ESA) has selected three NASA-nominated science teams to participate in their planned Euclid mission, including one team led by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA.

NASA is a partner in the Euclid mission, a space telescope designed to probe the mysteries of dark energy and dark matter. Euclid is currently scheduled to launch in 2020.

This artist's concept shows the Euclid spacecraft. The telescope will launch to an orbit around the sun-Earth Lagrange point L2. The Lagrange point is a location where the gravitational pull of two large masses, the sun and Earth in this case, precisely equals the force required for a small object, such as the Euclid spacecraft, to maintain a relatively stationary position behind Earth as seen from the sun. (Image credit: ESA/C. Carreau)

This artist’s concept shows the Euclid spacecraft. The telescope will launch to an orbit around the sun-Earth Lagrange point L2. The Lagrange point is a location where the gravitational pull of two large masses, the sun and Earth in this case, precisely equals the force required for a small object, such as the Euclid spacecraft, to maintain a relatively stationary position behind Earth as seen from the sun. (Image credit: ESA/C. Carreau)

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope helps Astronomers measure our Universe’s Expansion

 

Written by Whitney Clavin
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Astronomers using NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope have announced one of the most precise measurements yet of the Hubble constant, or the rate at which our universe is stretching apart.

The Hubble constant is named after the astronomer Edwin P. Hubble, who astonished the world in the 1920s by confirming our universe has been expanding since it exploded into being 13.7 billion years ago. In the late 1990s, astronomers discovered the expansion is accelerating, or speeding up, over time. Determining the expansion rate is critical for understanding the age and size of the universe.

Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have greatly improved the cosmic distance ladder used to measure the expansion rate of the universe, as well as its size and age. The cosmic distance ladder, symbolically shown here in this artist's concept, is a series of stars and other objects within galaxies that have known distances. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Astronomers using NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope have greatly improved the cosmic distance ladder used to measure the expansion rate of the universe, as well as its size and age. The cosmic distance ladder, symbolically shown here in this artist’s concept, is a series of stars and other objects within galaxies that have known distances. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Tennessee State Parks announce Middle Tennessee Events starting October 15th

 

Tennessee – Fall in Tennessee is a glorious time!  Tennessee State Parks have some of the very best events and programs the season has to offer.  Here are just a few state park events in your area, including great opportunities to pay tribute to Autumn!

Finding a state park in your own backyard is easy to do and you don’t have to spend a lot of gas money to get there!

Tennessee State Parks offer a variety of activities and events throughout the winter. From great hikes to bluegrass – there’s something designed for the entire family!

Here are just a few state park events in your area. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 



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