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Topic: nutrition

American Heart Association says Children with Food Insecurity at risk for High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationChicago, IL – Kids with food insecurity, meaning they lack good access to nutritional foods, were more likely to have high blood pressure than kids with secure access to food, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Joint Hypertension 2018 Scientific Sessions.

“High blood pressure — even in childhood — matters,” said study author Andrew Michael South, M.D., assistant professor of pediatric nephrology at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

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Fort Campbell Army Wellness Center helps Army spouse reach her fitness goals

 

Written by Maria Yager
Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Public Affairs

Blanchfield Army Hospital - BACH - Fort Campbell KYFort Campbell, KY – Army spouse Leah Hernandez seemed to be at an impasse. She attended a gym, exercised regularly, watched what she ate, drank plenty of water, but for some reason she could not seem to lose any weight. Frustrated, she turned to the staff at the Fort Campbell Army Wellness Center to see what more she could do.

“The Army Wellness Center offers standardized primary prevention programs for our Soldiers and retirees, their family members and Department of the Army civilians. We are trying to help our population lead healthy lifestyles by teaching people how to make healthy lifestyle changes and healthy habits when it comes to stress, physical fitness and nutrition,” said Jheri Weidensall, Army Wellness Center program lead.

Jheri Weidensall, Fort Campbell Army Wellness Center program specialist talks to participants at a Fueling for Health Class about the variety and quantity of foods they should eat for optimal nutrition and wellness. The class is one of many wellness events offered free at the Army Wellness Center to Soldiers, retirees, family members and Department of the Army Civilians. (U.S. Army photo by Maria Yager)

Jheri Weidensall, Fort Campbell Army Wellness Center program specialist talks to participants at a Fueling for Health Class about the variety and quantity of foods they should eat for optimal nutrition and wellness. The class is one of many wellness events offered free at the Army Wellness Center to Soldiers, retirees, family members and Department of the Army Civilians. (U.S. Army photo by Maria Yager)

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American Heart Association provides Five Tips to Eat Smart during the Holidays

 

The American Heart Association’s Healthy For Good™ and Fresh Avocados – Love One Today® help Americans stay on track this festive season

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Seasonal sweet treats and multi-course meals tempt even the most dedicated healthy eaters during the holidays. That’s why the American Heart Association is designating November as Eat Smart Month.

Kicking off with Eat Smart Day on November 1st, the month-long campaign is part of the Association’s new Healthy For Good movement, supported by National Recipe Host Fresh Avocados – Love One Today®. As part of the campaign, the Association will provide nutrition tips and healthy recipes throughout the month.

Slow-cooker panang curry with chicken cauliflower rice. (American Heart Association)

Slow-cooker panang curry with chicken cauliflower rice. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil may boost ‘good’ cholesterol

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil may enhance the cardioprotective benefits of high-density lipoproteins (HDL—the “good” cholesterol) compared to other diets, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

High levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL—the “bad cholesterol”) and triglycerides, a type of blood fat, are associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases. HDL cholesterol is associated with a lower risk because these lipoproteins help eliminate the excess cholesterol from the bloodstream.

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet - whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet – whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

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NASA looks at the Super Bowl – 5 Things Football has in Common with Space

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – As Super Bowl LI in Houston Texas approaches and players, coaches and a host of personnel behind the scenes prepare for the big game in Space City, NASA remains on the cutting edge of human space exploration, setting its sights on the journey to Mars.

A football player’s journey to the end zone, though, has a lot more in common to space exploration than one might think.

Here are five similarities.

Five Things Space and Football Have in Common

Five Things Space and Football Have in Common

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American Heart Association says Better Nutrition and Active Play in Early Care and Education is Critical to Healthy Futures

 

Statement from National Organizations Working to Improve the Health of Young Children

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For many young children, their first time down a slide or their first time trying new vegetables are in preschool or child care settings.  Young children thrive, grow and begin to develop a lifetime of habits in these early years—that is why it is so important we reach kids in early care and education settings.

Several states have made significant strides in ensuring all young children have the building blocks they need—nutritious foods and plenty of active play—for a healthy life.

Better Nutrition and Active Play is Key to Children's Healthy Futures

Better Nutrition and Active Play is Key to Children’s Healthy Futures

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American Heart Association and Aramark Announce Significant Progress against Goal to Improve Health of Americans by 2020

 

Healthy for Life® 20 By 20 Year One Report: Calories, sodium and sat fats down 8 percent, fruits, veggies and whole grains up

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The first-year report released by Aramark and the American Heart Association (AHA) on their goal to improve the health of Americans by 2020 shows significant progress by Aramark achieving an 8 percent reduction in calories, sodium and saturated fats, and increasing fruits, vegetables and whole grains across the menus it serves in colleges and universities, hospital cafes and workplace locations.

Over 30 percent of main dishes served on these menus are now vegetarian or vegan, and more than 10 percent have whole grains as a leading ingredient.

A diet rich in vegetables and fruits with a higher ratio of fish External link to meats appeared to be more beneficial for preventing heart disease. (Photo by American Heart Association)

A diet rich in vegetables and fruits with a higher ratio of fish External link to meats appeared to be more beneficial for preventing heart disease. (Photo by American Heart Association)

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Children should eat less than 25 grams of added Sugars daily according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children ages 2 to 18 should eat or drink less than six teaspoons of added sugars daily, according to the scientific statement recommending a specific limit on added sugars for children, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Six teaspoons of added sugars is equivalent to about 100 calories or 25 grams.

“Our target recommendation is the same for all children between the ages of 2 and 18 to keep it simple for parents and public health advocates,” said Miriam Vos, M.D., Ms.P.H, lead author, nutrition scientist and associate professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

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Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health according to American Heart Association

 

Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO, comments on evaluation of sugary drink taxes in Berkeley, California published in the American Journal of Public Health.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In 2014, Berkeley, California paved the way in our nation once again with policies that support healthy living. Berkeley was the first city in our nation to implement a tax on sugary drinks at the minimum level recommended by the American Heart Association of one penny per ounce to raise revenue for improving community health and nutrition.

Researchers have assessed the initial impact of the Berkeley tax in a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health “These early encouraging results affirm what we had believed -- the tax motivated people to drink fewer sugary drinks and more water in the first year.” Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO comments on increasing evidence for taxing sugary drinks to improve heart health. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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U.S. Army Health of Force report wake up call for improving readiness

 

Written by David Vergun
Defense Media Activity – Army

U.S. ArmyWashington, D.C. – Obesity and overweight metrics, along with health indicators like tobacco use, injuries, substance abuse and the Performance Triad were among the topics at a conference last week discussing the inaugural “Health of the Force” report.

The HOF report, released at the end of 2015, provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center.

That report, she said during a media roundtable conducted from the Office of the Army Surgeon General in Falls Church, Virginia, March 16th, is similar to, but much more comprehensive than “The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America” report, issued by the non-profit Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2014.

The Health of the Force report provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center. (David Vergun, Defense Media Activity - Army)

The Health of the Force report provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center. (David Vergun, Defense Media Activity – Army)

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