Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Space Shuttle

5 NASA Space Technologies that have driven Auto Innovations

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Space technology developed by and for NASA has made its way into cars and even onto the NASCAR track. Future collaborations with the auto industry and car manufacturers could change how we get from point A to point B. NASA helped drive the following five auto innovations.

NASA has a long history of transferring technology to the private sector. The agency’s Spinoff publication profiles NASA technologies that have transformed into commercial products and services, demonstrating the broader benefits of America’s investment in its space program. Spinoff is a publication of the Technology Transfer program in NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate.

NASA studied the posture astronauts’ bodies naturally assumed in microgravity while onboard the first space station Skylab, shown here. (NASA)

NASA studied the posture astronauts’ bodies naturally assumed in microgravity while onboard the first space station Skylab, shown here. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA Mourns the Passing of Astronaut John Young

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Astronaut John Young, who walked on the Moon during Apollo 16 and commanded the first space shuttle mission, died Friday, January 5th, 2018, at the age of 87 from complications of pneumonia. Young began his impressive career at NASA in 1962, when he was selected from among hundreds of young pilots to join NASA’s second astronaut class, known as the “New Nine.”

“Today, NASA and the world have lost a pioneer,” acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot said in a statement. “Astronaut John Young’s storied career spanned three generations of spaceflight; we will stand on his shoulders as we look toward the next human frontier.

John Young's official astronaut portrait. (NASA)

John Young’s official astronaut portrait. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA says researchers use Microgravity Environment aboard International Space Station to better understand Fungi

 

Written by Laura Niles
International Space Station Program Science Office and Public Affairs Office

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – You may not recognize it by name, but if you have ever had a child with a diaper rash, that child was likely a host to Candida albicans (C. albicans). This unwelcome “guest” can be hard to control, as it can potentially lead to serious illness in humans with weakened immune systems.

During an investigation dubbed “Microbe,” using the unique microgravity environment aboard space shuttle Atlantis on an International Space Station mission, researchers at the Arizona State University (ASU) in Tempe gained a better understanding of these prevalent fungi.

Group Activation Pack cylinders similar to these, pictured within the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus, were used to study the fungal pathogen C. albicans aboard space shuttle Atlantis. (NASA)

Group Activation Pack cylinders similar to these, pictured within the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus, were used to study the fungal pathogen C. albicans aboard space shuttle Atlantis. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


NASA Astronauts go through Simulated Launch of the New Orion Spacecraft

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA astronauts recently experienced what it will be like to launch into space aboard the new Orion spacecraft during the first ascent simulations since the space shuttles and their simulators were retired.

Ascent simulations are precise rehearsals of the steps a spacecraft’s crew will be responsible for – including things that could go wrong – during their climb into space.

Astronauts Rick Linnehan and Mike Foreman try out a prototype display and control system inside an Orion spacecraft mockup at Johnson Space Center during the first ascent and abort simulations for the program. (NASA)

Astronauts Rick Linnehan and Mike Foreman try out a prototype display and control system inside an Orion spacecraft mockup at Johnson Space Center during the first ascent and abort simulations for the program. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope Celebrates 10 Years of Operation

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Ten years after a Delta II rocket launched NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, lighting up the night sky over Cape Canaveral, FL, the fourth of the agency’s four Great Observatories continues to illuminate the dark side of the cosmos with its infrared eyes.

The telescope studied comets and asteroids, counted stars, scrutinized planets and galaxies, and discovered soccer-ball-shaped carbon spheres in space called buckyballs. Moving into its second decade of scientific scouting from an Earth-trailing orbit, Spitzer continues to explore the cosmos near and far.

A montage of images taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope over the years. (Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

A montage of images taken by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope over the years. (Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA Vehicle Assembly Building Prepared for Another 50 Years of Service

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNASA’s Kennedy Space Center, FL – Construction of the Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida began a half-century ago this summer.

After serving through the Apollo and Space Shuttle Programs, the mammoth structure now is undergoing renovations to accommodate future launch vehicles and to continue as a major part of America’s efforts to explore space for another 50 years.

The Apollo 11 rocket towers over the Kennedy Space Center’s crawlerway during the May 20th, 1969 rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A. The Saturn V launched astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin on the first lunar landing mission wtih Armstrong and Aldrin walking on the moon on July 20th. 1969. (Image Credit: NASA)

The Apollo 11 rocket towers over the Kennedy Space Center’s crawlerway during the May 20th, 1969 rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A. The Saturn V launched astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin on the first lunar landing mission wtih Armstrong and Aldrin walking on the moon on July 20th. 1969. (Image Credit: NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA finishes testing Cryogenic Propellant Tank to be used for future Space Exploration

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA recently completed a major space technology development milestone by successfully testing a pressurized, large cryogenic propellant tank made of composite materials. The composite tank will enable the next generation of rockets and spacecraft needed for space exploration.

Cryogenic propellants are gasses chilled to subfreezing temperatures and condensed to form highly combustible liquids, providing high-energy propulsion solutions critical to future, long-term human exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


Space Exploration Technologies Dragon spacecraft splashes in the Pacific and brings with it NASA Cargo from International Space Station

 

Written by Josh Byerly
NASA’s Johnson Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – A Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) Dragon spacecraft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 2:22pm CDT Sunday a few hundred miles west of Baja California, Mexico. The splashdown successfully ended the first contracted cargo delivery flight contracted by NASA to resupply the International Space Station.

“With a big splash in the Pacific Ocean, we are reminded American ingenuity is alive and well and keeping our great nation at the cutting edge of innovation and technology development,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden.

The Dragon spacecraft is secured before being transported back to a SpaceX facility. (SpaceX)

The Dragon spacecraft is secured before being transported back to a SpaceX facility. (SpaceX)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

NASA’s Johnson Space Center pushes hardware systems to the limit in their Structures Test Lab

 

NASA’s Johnson Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – Imagine a work place where it’s perfectly OK to break stuff … on purpose. There is such a place at Johnson Space Center in the Structures Test Lab (STL). A team of technicians and engineers spend their days conducting structural static load testing of assemblies and components to support programs and organizations inside and outside of JSC.

The lab performs about 30 tests per year, and much of what they do involves mechanical properties testing, which means they assess the strength and durability of a range of materials and perform full-scale verification testing of payloads and spacecraft structures.

Preparations underway for the CPAS Parachute Test Vehicle load test performed in 2008. (Credit: NASA)

Preparations underway for the CPAS Parachute Test Vehicle load test performed in 2008. (Credit: NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Hubble Telescope measurements give astronomers data to predict Milky Way Galaxy collision with Andromeda Galaxy

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA astronomers say they can now predict with certainty the next major cosmic event to affect our galaxy, sun, and solar system: the titanic collision of our Milky Way galaxy with the neighboring Andromeda galaxy.

The Milky Way is destined to get a major makeover during the encounter, which is predicted to happen four billion years from now. It is likely the sun will be flung into a new region of our galaxy, but our Earth and solar system are in no danger of being destroyed.

The Milky Way and Andromeda are moving toward each other under the inexorable pull of gravity. Also shown is a smaller galaxy, Triangulum, which may be part of the smashup. (Credit: NASA; ESA; A. Feild and R. van der Marel, STScI)

The Milky Way and Andromeda are moving toward each other under the inexorable pull of gravity. Also shown is a smaller galaxy, Triangulum, which may be part of the smashup. (Credit: NASA; ESA; A. Feild and R. van der Marel, STScI)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Now playing at the Movies