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Topic: University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Austin Peay State University classics senior Alexander Kee finishes second at National Translation Contest

 

Austin Peay State University (APSU) 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University (APSU) classics senior Alexander Kee last month finished second in a national Latin translation contest. It was his second straight second-place finish in the annual competition.

Austin Peay State Univerity student Alexander Kee

Austin Peay State Univerity student Alexander Kee

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APSU professor Kristen Sienkiewicz performs on ensemble opera CD release titled “Deux Ex Machina”

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University assistant professor of music, Dr. Kristen Sienkiewicz, is playing an important role in a unique spin on the classical music tradition of opera.

Set for release on October 1st, “Deus Ex Machina,” is a new graphic novel steampunk opera by award-winning composer Robert J. Bradshaw. The electroacoustic work features a diverse collection of vocal talent, including soprano Gillian Hurst, baritone Gary Wood (Salem State University) and tenor Brendan P. Buckley.

APSU assistant professor of music, Dr. Kristen Sienkiewicz.

APSU assistant professor of music, Dr. Kristen Sienkiewicz.

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NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data used to help Map the Milky Way Galaxy

 

Written by Whitney Clavin
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Imagine trying to create a map of your house while confined to only the living room. You might peek through the doors into other rooms or look for light spilling in through the windows. But, in the end, the walls and lack of visibility would largely prevent you from seeing the big picture.

The job of mapping our own Milky Way galaxy from planet Earth, situated about two-thirds of the way out from the galaxy’s center, is similarly difficult. Clouds of dust permeate the Milky Way, blocking our view of the galaxy’s stars.

This artist's concept depicts the most up-to-date information about the shape of our own Milky Way galaxy. We live around a star, our sun, located about two-thirds of the way out from the center. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech))

This artist’s concept depicts the most up-to-date information about the shape of our own Milky Way galaxy. We live around a star, our sun, located about two-thirds of the way out from the center. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech))

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NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope captures image of New Stars forming in Serpens Cloud Core

 

Written by Whitney Clavin
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Stars that are just beginning to coalesce out of cool swaths of dust and gas are showcased in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS).

Infrared light has been assigned colors we see with our eyes, revealing young stars in orange and yellow, and a central parcel of gas in blue. This area is hidden in visible-light views, but infrared light can travel through the dust, offering a peek inside the stellar hatchery.

Within the swaddling dust of the Serpens Cloud Core, astronomers are studying one of the youngest collections of stars ever seen in our galaxy. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/2MASS)

Within the swaddling dust of the Serpens Cloud Core, astronomers are studying one of the youngest collections of stars ever seen in our galaxy. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/2MASS)

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APSU’s Zone 3 Press publishes Book that wins PEN New England Award

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Earlier this year, the famed American poet Richard Blanco became a fan of a young poet named Karen Skofield. After reading her debut collection, “Frost in the Low Areas,” he admitted to falling “in love with poetry all over again.”

“She understands that poetry does not exist independently; it is pulled out of all we see, without pretense or artifice, and not in the obvious and expected ways either,” he said.

Karen Skofield's book, “Frost in the Low Areas,”  recipient of this year’s PEN New England Award.

Karen Skofield’s book, “Frost in the Low Areas,” recipient of this year’s PEN New England Award.

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Native Plants in Urban Yards Offer Birds “Mini-Refuges”

 

The National Science FoundationPhoenix, AZ – Yards with plants that mimic native vegetation offer birds “mini-refuges” and help to offset losses of biodiversity in cities, according to results of a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

“Native” yards support birds better than those with traditional grass lawns and non-native plantings.

Researchers conducted the study through the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, one of 26 such sites around the globe in ecosystems from coral reefs to deserts, from forests to grasslands.

A xeric, or desert, yard in Phoenix: This yard with native vegetation is a mini-refuge for birds. (Susannah Lerman/University of Massachusetts-Amherst)

A xeric, or desert, yard in Phoenix: This yard with native vegetation is a mini-refuge for birds. (Susannah Lerman/University of Massachusetts-Amherst)

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