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Topic: Florida Keys

Dodging the Roadkill: Rocky Mountain High – Part 2

 

Dodging the Roadkill - A Biker's JourneyClarksville, TN – I landed in Colorado Springs at about 3:00pm after a long day in the saddle.  The ride was a mix of calm, cool traveling through Wyoming, then an absolute circus navigating down I-25 through Denver.  I was tired and ready for a shower.

This would be my second visit to Colorado having been here in 2017.  It was magnificent then and it’s magnificent now.  Just having the Colorado mountains in the background makes it so beautiful.  And, the altitude reminds me that I’m not in Kansas anymore.

Colorado Springs Lisa Sumner

Colorado Springs Lisa Sumner

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NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement satellite monitors Eastern United States Storms, Tornadoes

 

Written by Stephen Lang / Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – On Sunday April 15th, 2018 a line of strong storms at one point stretched from the Florida Straits below the Florida Keys all the way up the East Coast and into Ohio. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the severe storms as it passed overhead. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.

Many of the storms were strong with wide spread reports of wind damage from north Florida up through the Carolinas and into central Virginia.

GPM captured an image of the advancing line of storms on April 16 at 00:17 UTC (8:17 pm EDT, April 15). GPM showed a narrow leading line of thunderstorms producing heavy rain rates (orange and red areas), followed by a much broader area of light to moderate rain (blue and lighter green areas). (NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce)

GPM captured an image of the advancing line of storms on April 16 at 00:17 UTC (8:17 pm EDT, April 15). GPM showed a narrow leading line of thunderstorms producing heavy rain rates (orange and red areas), followed by a much broader area of light to moderate rain (blue and lighter green areas). (NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce)

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NASA observes Tropical Storm Irma moving North up Florida Peninsula

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured night-time look at Hurricane Irma as it weakened to a large tropical storm and the GOES East satellite provided a daytime view as the large storm continued moving north over Florida.

Irma made landfall twice on September 10th, 2017, first in the Florida Keys and then near Naples. The storm has now been downgraded to a tropical storm but could still cause significant impacts over Georgia and Alabama. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama was under a Tropical Storm Watch on September 11th.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this night-time infrared image of Hurricane Imra on Sept. 11, 2017 at 3:21 a.m. EDT (0721 UTC) located over central Florida. (NOAA/NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team)

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured this night-time infrared image of Hurricane Imra on Sept. 11, 2017 at 3:21 a.m. EDT (0721 UTC) located over central Florida. (NOAA/NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team)

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NASA and NOAA Satellites capture images of Hurricane Irma hitting Florida

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – As Hurricane Irma approached southern Florida, a NASA satellite captured a night-time image of the storm in the Florida Straits and identified where the strongest storms were occurring within Irma’s structure. NOAA’s GOES satellite provided a visible image at the time of Irma’s landfall in the Florida Keys.

As Irma moved along the coast of Cuba, the storm weakened to a Category 3 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

After moving away from the northern coast of Cuba, Irma passed over waters that are warmer than 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit).

This visible image of Category 4 Hurricane Irma was taken on Sunday Sept. 10, 2017 at 9:25 a.m. EDT (1325 UTC) by the NOAA GOES East satellite as its eye approached the southwestern coast of Florida. Hurricane Jose is seen (right) near the Leeward Islands. (NASA/NOAA GOES Project)

This visible image of Category 4 Hurricane Irma was taken on Sunday Sept. 10, 2017 at 9:25 a.m. EDT (1325 UTC) by the NOAA GOES East satellite as its eye approached the southwestern coast of Florida. Hurricane Jose is seen (right) near the Leeward Islands. (NASA/NOAA GOES Project)

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NASA observes Hurricane Irma moving along Cuba’s Coast

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Hurricane Irma was moving up Cuba’s northern coast when NASA’s Aqua satellite passed overhead.

A satellite instrument revealed coldest temperatures of powerful thunderstorm tops surrounding Irma’s eye and in a band of thunderstorms over the Florida Keys.

Infrared MODIS data showed two areas with very cold cloud top temperatures of strong thunderstorms.

This infrared image from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite shows extremely cold temperatures (red) in thunderstorms surrounding the eye of Hurricane Irma as it traveled along Cuba's northern coast on Sept. 9 at 3:15 a.m. EDT (0715 UTC). (NASA/NRL)

This infrared image from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite shows extremely cold temperatures (red) in thunderstorms surrounding the eye of Hurricane Irma as it traveled along Cuba’s northern coast on Sept. 9 at 3:15 a.m. EDT (0715 UTC). (NASA/NRL)

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NASA uses Satellites to gain different perspective on Hurricane Irma

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Satellite imagery from NASA’s Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite have provided different data on the still Category 5 Hurricane Irma as it headed for the Turks and Caicos Islands.

On September 6th at 1:45pm EDT (1745 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible-light image of Hurricane Irma over the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. The image revealed a clear eye with powerful bands of thunderstorms circling the eye.

On Sept. 6 at 1:45 p.m. EDT (1745 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible-light image of Hurricane Irma over the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. (NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team)

On Sept. 6 at 1:45 p.m. EDT (1745 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible-light image of Hurricane Irma over the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. (NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team)

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NASA tracks Hurricane Matthew as it Heads for the Bahamas

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Satellites from NASA and NOAA have been tracking and analyzing powerful Hurricane Matthew since its birth just east of the Leeward Islands on September 28th.

On October 4th, 2016, Hurricane Matthew made landfall on southwestern Haiti as a category-4 storm—the strongest storm to hit the Caribbean nation in more than 50 years. Just hours after landfall, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired a natural-color image that showed the western extent over the eastern tip of Cuba and the eastern-most extent over Puerto Rico.

On October 4, 2016, Hurricane Matthew made landfall on southwestern Haiti as a category-4 storm—the strongest storm to hit the Caribbean nation in more than 50 years. Just hours after landfall, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this natural-color image. At the time, Matthew had top sustained winds of about 230 kilometers (145 miles) per hour. Credits: NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens

On October 4, 2016, Hurricane Matthew made landfall on southwestern Haiti as a category-4 storm—the strongest storm to hit the Caribbean nation in more than 50 years. Just hours after landfall, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this natural-color image. At the time, Matthew had top sustained winds of about 230 kilometers (145 miles) per hour.
Credits: NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens

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