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Topic: Lakes

NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft data gives new insights into Titan’s Lakes

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – On its final flyby of Saturn’s largest moon in 2017, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft gathered radar data revealing that the small liquid lakes in Titan’s northern hemisphere are surprisingly deep, perched atop hills and filled with methane.

The new findings, published April 15th in Nature Astronomy, are the first confirmation of just how deep some of Titan’s lakes are (more than 300 feet, or 100 meters) and of their composition. They provide new information about the way liquid methane rains on, evaporates from and seeps into Titan – the only planetary body in our solar system other than Earth known to have stable liquid on its surface.

This near-infrared, color view from Cassini shows the sun glinting off of Titan's north polar seas. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. Arizona/Univ. Idaho)

This near-infrared, color view from Cassini shows the sun glinting off of Titan’s north polar seas. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. Arizona/Univ. Idaho)

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Dispose trash properly when visiting U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lakes

 

Written by Park Ranger Tanner Rich
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN – Visitors at Corps lakes go boating, fishing, swimming or maybe just relax on the shoreline. All these activities are perfectly fine until one particular thing happens – littering. When this disgraceful activity happens then the good time turns into “trash pickup time.”

What is the definition of trash? Trash is discarded matter that is no longer being used for any kind of activity. Empty cans, bottles, fishing line, Styrofoam, and lots of other harmful items are all things that adversely affect area lakes.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District encourages the public to properly dispose trash when visiting Corps lakes.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District encourages the public to properly dispose trash when visiting Corps lakes.

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Tennessee Department of Health says make a Healthy Splash this Summer; Share the Fun, Not the Germs

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – Many public pools in Tennessee and around the country open for the season on Memorial Day. While swimming is a fun way to be active and beat the heat, thousands of Americans get sick every year from germs found in pools and other swimming places.

The Tennessee Department of Health joins the observance of Healthy and Safe Swimming during the Memorial Day Weekend to spread the word about helping keep swimming sites safe and healthy.

Girl in swimming pool «Read the rest of this article»

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Volunteers needed at Fort Campbell for Project Clean Streams

 

Fort Campbell's Morale, Welfare and Recreation - MWRFort Campbell, KY – Join the Environmental Division Stormwater Program on Friday, Apiril 17th, 2015 for a morning of fun and fresh air as volunteers to help clean trash and debris along the banks of Fort Campbell lakes and streams.

This beautification project is aimed to make our waterways cleaner, safer, and to reduce the adverse effects pollution has on our water quality.

Everyone is to meet at Wohali Pavilion outside Gate 10 (Lake Taal).

Volunteers needed at Fort Campbell for Project Clean Streams «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Department of Health says Stay Healthy and Safe while enjoying the Water this Summer

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – While swimming is a fun way to beat the heat and be physically active, thousands of Americans get sick every year due to germs found in the places where we swim.

“We can all help keep our swimming areas safe this summer by following a few easy steps,” said TDH Chief Medical Officer David Reagan, MD, PhD. “Taking precautions like showering before swimming and never letting children swim without supervision helps prevent illness and injuries.”

Stay Healthy and Safe while out Swimming this Summer.

Stay Healthy and Safe while out Swimming this Summer.

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NASA’s Cassini spacecraft gets images of Lakes on Saturn’s moon Titan

 

Written by Jia-Rui Cook
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – With the sun now shining down over the north pole of Saturn’s moon Titan, a little luck with the weather, and trajectories that put the spacecraft into optimal viewing positions, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has obtained new pictures of the liquid methane and ethane seas and lakes that reside near Titan’s north pole.

The images reveal new clues about how the lakes formed and about Titan’s Earth-like “hydrologic” cycle, which involves hydrocarbons rather than water.

This false-color mosaic, made from infrared data collected by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, reveals the differences in the composition of surface materials around hydrocarbon lakes at Titan, Saturn's largest moon. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/University of Idaho)

This false-color mosaic, made from infrared data collected by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, reveals the differences in the composition of surface materials around hydrocarbon lakes at Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/University of Idaho)

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NASA looks into the Mystery of the Missing Waves on the Lakes of Saturn’s moon Titan

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – One of the most shocking discoveries of the past 10 years is how much the landscape of Saturn’s moon Titan resembles Earth.

Like our own blue planet, the surface of Titan is dotted with lakes and seas; it has river channels, islands, mud, rain clouds and maybe even rainbows. The giant moon is undeniably wet.

The “water” on Titan is not, however, H2O. With a surface temperature dipping 290 degrees fahrenheit below zero, Titan is far too cold for liquid water. Instead, researchers believe the fluid that sculpts Titan is an unknown mixture of methane, ethane, and other hard-to-freeze hydrocarbons.

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Tennessee Department of Health says be Proactive, Prepared and Protected for Safe and Healthy Travel

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Many families and individuals spend the year planning for and dreaming of their spring or summer vacations. Trips to the beach, visits to faraway relatives and sessions at camp can be fun and exciting and the source of happy memories for years to come.

The Tennessee Department of Health offers tips to help ensure all Tennessee travelers have safe and healthy trips this and every year. «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA’s Cassini spacecraft observations show the craters on Saturn’s Moon Titan disappearing

 

Written by Jia-Rui Cook
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Titan’s siblings must be jealous. While most of Saturn’s moons display their ancient faces pockmarked by thousands of craters, Titan – Saturn’s largest moon – may look much younger than it really is because its craters are getting erased.

Dunes of exotic, hydrocarbon sand are slowly but steadily filling in its craters, according to new research using observations from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.

This set of images from the radar instrument on NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows a relatively "fresh" crater called Sinlap (left) and an extremely degraded crater called Soi (right). Sinlap has a depth-to-diameter ratio close to what we see on Jupiter's moon Ganymede. Soi has a shallow depth compared to similar craters on Ganymede. These craters are both about 50 miles (80 kilometers) in diameter. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/GSFC)

This set of images from the radar instrument on NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows a relatively “fresh” crater called Sinlap (left) and an extremely degraded crater called Soi (right). Sinlap has a depth-to-diameter ratio close to what we see on Jupiter’s moon Ganymede. Soi has a shallow depth compared to similar craters on Ganymede. These craters are both about 50 miles (80 kilometers) in diameter. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/GSFC)

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NASA’s Cassini spacecraft takes image of River on Saturn’s Moon Titan that looks like Earth’s Nile River

 

Written by Jia-Rui Cook
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Scientists with NASA’s Cassini mission have spotted what appears to be a miniature, extraterrestrial likeness of Earth’s Nile River: a river valley on Saturn’s moon Titan that stretches more than 200 miles (400 kilometers) from its “headwaters” to a large sea.

It is the first time images have revealed a river system this vast and in such high resolution anywhere other than Earth.

This image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows a vast river system on Saturn's moon Titan. It is the first time images from space have revealed a river system so vast and in such high resolution anywhere other than Earth. (Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI)

This image from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows a vast river system on Saturn’s moon Titan. It is the first time images from space have revealed a river system so vast and in such high resolution anywhere other than Earth. (Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI)

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