Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: National Heart Lung and Blood Institute

American Heart Association reports Overweight and obese people are burdened by cardiovascular disease at younger ages

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – People who are overweight or obese may live as long as or less than those of healthy weight, but they experience cardiovascular disease at an earlier age and live longer burdened by the disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Smokers far more likely to develop abdominal aortic aneurysms

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who smoke may be nearly twice as likely to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm than the general population, but they can lower their risk of the potentially life-threating condition by quitting, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a bulge in the large artery that supplies blood to the belly, pelvis and legs.

Quitting smoking can substantially reduce the risk of developing this life-threatening condition.

Quitting smoking can substantially reduce the risk of developing this life-threatening condition.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Smoking leaves historical “footprint” in DNA

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoking leaves its “footprint” on the human genome in the form of DNA methylation, a process by which cells control gene activity, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, an American Heart Association journal.

The new findings suggest that DNA methylation could be an important sign that reveals an individual’s smoking history, and could provide researchers with potential targets for new therapies.

Smoking has a very broad, long-lasting impact on the human genome. (American Heart Association)

Smoking has a very broad, long-lasting impact on the human genome. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Drinking alcohol daily may enlarge heart chamber; lead to atrial fibrillation according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Despite the common perception that moderate alcohol intake is good for the heart, new research suggests long-term alcohol consumption, even as little as one drink a day may enlarge the heart’s left upper chamber (atrium) and increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Smoking may lead to Heart Failure by thickening the Heart Wall

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoking is associated with thicker heart walls and reduction in the heart’s pumping ability, two factors associated with increased risk of heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.

The study, conducted in participants of average age 75.7 and no obvious signs of cardiovascular disease, also found that higher rates of cumulative cigarette exposure — measure of how much and how long people have smoked during their lifetime — were associated with greater heart damage.

The longer and more cigarettes people smoked, the greater the damage to their hearts’ structure and function.

The longer and more cigarettes people smoked, the greater the damage to their hearts’ structure and function.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Gallstone Disease may increase Heart Disease Risk reports American Heart Association

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A history of gallstone disease may increase your risk of coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Gallstone disease is one of the most common and costly gastrointestinal disorders in the United States. Gallstone disease and coronary heart disease have similar risk factors, including diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and poor diet.

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

For the first time in history, High Blood Pressure is more common in Lower-Income Countries according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time in history, people living in low- and middle-income countries have a higher prevalence of hypertension – or high blood pressure – than people living in high-income countries, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A 2010 data analysis involving more than 968,000 participants from 90 countries found that more than 30 percent of adults worldwide live with high blood pressure, and 75 percent of those adults live in low- and middle-income countries.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Heart Disease Research Should be a Key Priority, Says American Heart Association

 

Senate Labor HHS Bill Funding Does Not Measure Up to Disease

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – The American Heart Association said today that the Senate FY 2017 funding bill for Labor, HHS and Education is a win for the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH), but unfortunately, does not make heart disease research a priority. The bill includes a welcome six percent bump to the NIH budget: $2 billion over current funding.

However, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) received just a 4.1 percent increase. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke was boosted by 6.3 percent – the amount the association requested – and an additional $100 million was invested in the BRAIN Initiative.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Smoking may increase kidney disease risk in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCigarette smoking is considered a universal health hazard, but it may be particularly damaging to kidney function among African-Americans smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Cardiovascular and kidney diseases are closely linked, but few people are aware of the impact of smoking on kidney function,” said Michael Hall, M.D., study lead author and an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Around-the-clock monitoring may unmask hypertension in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Wearing an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device that measures blood pressure around-the-clock may help identify African Americans who have masked or undetected high blood pressure outside of the doctor’s office, a tricky condition that can signal high blood pressure in the clinic down the road, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

The reverse of white coat hypertension (higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than at home), masked hypertension is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office but high readings outside of the office. Masked hypertension is easy to miss, and can occur during the day or night.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls