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Finger-pickin’ good: Soldier strums guitar, writes songs from his heart

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paula Taylor
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneNangarhar Province, Afghanistan – He grew up in the small town of Pearcy, AR, in a family of five and, as a teen, he found his love for music and has been playing, song writing and entertaining ever since.

His name is U.S. Army Cpl. Jamie Gold and he’s an all-wheeled vehicle mechanic assigned to the 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division.

“The first real interest in playing music was when I went to a football game, and I told my mom I would like to play music,” recalled Gold. “I heard the high school band play at halftime and that is when it all started.”

U.S Army Cpl. Jamie Gold, an all-wheeled vehicle mechanic and Pearcy, AR, native, plays his guitar and sings on Forward Operating Base Fenty in eastern Afghanistan Feb. 6th. Gold, assigned to the 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, is on his fourth combat tour. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paula Taylor, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

U.S Army Cpl. Jamie Gold, an all-wheeled vehicle mechanic and Pearcy, AR, native, plays his guitar and sings on Forward Operating Base Fenty in eastern Afghanistan Feb. 6th. Gold, assigned to the 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, is on his fourth combat tour. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paula Taylor, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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Surgeon slashes personal record during satellite Miami Marathon run

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paula Taylor
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneNangarhar Province, Afghanistan – His sleep was restless. The dark, early morning hours would soon come. He tossed and turned most of the night, finally rolling out of bed at 3:30am.

He’d been training hard for the past four months. The day had finally arrived for the young orthopaedic surgeon. After grabbing some caffeine and carbohydrates, he began drinking lots of water.

U.S. Army Maj. Patrick Smock of Liberty Hill, Texas, runs the Miami Marathon satellite race at Forward Operating Base Fenty in eastern Afghanistan Jan. 30th. Smock, an orthopaedic surgeon assigned to 745th Forward Surgical Team and attached to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, ran the 26.2-mile marathon in 3 hours, 27 minutes in eastern Afghanistan. (Photo by U.S. Army Spc. Richard Daniels Jr., Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Maj. Patrick Smock of Liberty Hill, Texas, runs the Miami Marathon satellite race at Forward Operating Base Fenty in eastern Afghanistan Jan. 30th. Smock, an orthopaedic surgeon assigned to 745th Forward Surgical Team and attached to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, ran the 26.2-mile marathon in 3 hours, 27 minutes in eastern Afghanistan. (Photo by U.S. Army Spc. Richard Daniels Jr., Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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Soldier’s ingenuity makes his dream a reality

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paula Taylor
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionNangarhar Province, Afghanistan – His thoughts jostled him awake in the hot July night. He had dreamt up a solution to a problem he’d been wrestling with in his mind for months. He couldn’t stop thinking about it. He eventually rolled out of bed with a renewed sense of purpose, and called his wife, Katie, then his parents.

U.S. Army Capt. Jonathan J. Springer, 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, had searched the Internet for a smart phone application that he could use on his deployment before leaving Fort Campbell, KY, in early May, but nothing was out there that suited his needs. He pondered the idea of inventing one of his own, but didn’t know how to do it or where to start.

U.S. Army Capt. Jonathan J. Springer, 101st Airborne Division, tests his new smart phone application in eastern Afghanistan’s Pech River Valley Jan. 9th. Springer, a Fort Wayne, IN, native, invented the navigational application to find an inexpensive yet reliable tool for Soldiers to use while at home or in a deployed environment. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Shoemaker, 3rd Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment)

U.S. Army Capt. Jonathan J. Springer, 101st Airborne Division, tests his new smart phone application in eastern Afghanistan’s Pech River Valley Jan. 9th. Springer, a Fort Wayne, IN, native, invented the navigational application to find an inexpensive yet reliable tool for Soldiers to use while at home or in a deployed environment. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Shoemaker, 3rd Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment)

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Small town Oregon boy makes big strides in Army

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paula Taylor
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs 
 
BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionNangarhar Province, Afghanistan – “His death was the hardest time in my life,” said the small-town boy from Colton, OR “My grandfather, Henry Rae, played a huge part in my upbringing. He would take me fishing and teach me how to grow and keep a wonderful garden. He was a wise and gentle man who taught me to respect others and love my family. My grandfather was my best friend and my greatest role model.”

Henry Rae served in Vietnam and his grandson, U.S. Army Spc. Thomas Floyd, that small town boy from Colton, is following in his footsteps.

Floyd, now serving in Company G, 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, came from humble beginnings. «Read the rest of this article»

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Nashville native finds niche in Nuristan

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Paula Taylor
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionNangarhar Province, Afghanistan – The Tennessee native casts an opposing silhouette against the night sky in eastern Afghanistan—standing  more than 6-foot-tall and weighing more than 215 pounds—but this baby-faced good ol’ boy, with his southern drawl and easy-going attitude, is as friendly and hard working as they come.

Since arriving to Task Force Bastogne’s Nuristan Province several months ago, U.S. Army Pfc. Raymond Cecil, a cannon crewmember, Battery A, 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, has already made a positive impression on his leaders.

Cannon crewmember, U.S. Army Pfc. Raymond Cecil, Battery A, 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, raises the elevation on the howitzer Dec. 12th at Forward Operating Base Kalagush. Cecil, a Nashville, TN, native, is currently deployed in eastern Afghanistan’s Nuristan Province. He is scheduled to redeploy back to Fort Campbell, KY, with his unit in the spring. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Bill Murray, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division)

Cannon crewmember, U.S. Army Pfc. Raymond Cecil, Battery A, 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, raises the elevation on the howitzer Dec. 12th at Forward Operating Base Kalagush. Cecil, a Nashville, TN, native, is currently deployed in eastern Afghanistan’s Nuristan Province. He is scheduled to redeploy back to Fort Campbell, KY, with his unit in the spring. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Bill Murray, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division)

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