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Topic: National Institutes of Health

American Heart Association says Women with Pregnancy Complication may have impaired Heart Function after Delivery

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Women who develop preeclampsia earlier in pregnancy are more likely to have thickening in their heart’s left ventricle one month after delivery.

The changes were more severe among women who developed the condition early – before the 34th week of pregnancy, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017, in San Francisco.

The heart muscle changes were more severe among women who developed preeclampsia before 34 weeks of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

The heart muscle changes were more severe among women who developed preeclampsia before 34 weeks of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says National Institutes of Health funding dwindles for Cardiac Arrest Research

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to conduct cardiac arrest research has dwindled in the last decade and is a fraction of what the government spends to study other leading causes of death, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Study authors cite Institute of Medicine statistics that suggest cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than 450,000 lives each year.

NIH Research Funding Graphic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Latest Statistics show Heart Failure on the rise; Cardiovascular Diseases remain Leading Killer

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The number of adults living with heart failure increased from about 5.7 million (2009-2012) to about 6.5 million (2011-2014), according to the American Heart Association’s 2017 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update.

Based on the latest statistics, the number of people diagnosed with heart failure, which means the heart is too weak to pump blood throughout the body, is projected to rise by 46 percent by 2030, resulting in more than 8 million people adults with heart failure.

American Heart Association - life is why «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Children born by Cesarean Section may have a Greater Risk of Obesity

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Children delivered by Cesarean section may have an increased risk for obesity compared to children born vaginally, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Compared to vaginally-delivered children, Cesarean-delivered children had 40 percent greater odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood. This association was even greater if their mother was overweight or obese, suggesting that among obese mothers vaginal delivery may help reduce the intergenerational association of obesity.

Compared with vaginally-delivered children, those born by Cesarean section had a 1.4 times greater odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Compared with vaginally-delivered children, those born by Cesarean section had a 1.4 times greater odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood. (American Heart Association)

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Air Pollution linked to Blood Vessel damage in Healthy Young Adults according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Fine particulate matter air pollution may be associated with blood vessel damage and inflammation among young, healthy adults, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

“These results substantially expand our understanding about how air pollution contributes to cardiovascular disease by showing that exposure is associated with a cascade of adverse effects,” said C. Arden Pope, Ph.D., study lead author and Mary Lou Fulton Professor of Economics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Moderate Physical Activity lowers Heart Disease risk in Young Women

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Spending a cumulative 2.5 hours a week doing recreational physical activity is linked with a 25 percent lower risk of coronary heart disease in women under age 50, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The benefits of physical activity for cardiovascular health in general have been shown in numerous studies, but most focused on middle-aged and older adults.

Physical Activity Infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Blood Glucose Health is decreasing in Obese Adults; increasing risks for Type 2 Diabetes, Cardio Complications

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXBlood glucose health is deteriorating in obese adults, despite overall progress in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which may raise the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

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Heart Disease Research Should be a Key Priority, Says American Heart Association

 

Senate Labor HHS Bill Funding Does Not Measure Up to Disease

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – The American Heart Association said today that the Senate FY 2017 funding bill for Labor, HHS and Education is a win for the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH), but unfortunately, does not make heart disease research a priority. The bill includes a welcome six percent bump to the NIH budget: $2 billion over current funding.

However, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) received just a 4.1 percent increase. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke was boosted by 6.3 percent – the amount the association requested – and an additional $100 million was invested in the BRAIN Initiative.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Healthy Diet may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in Pregnancy-Related Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with pregnancy-related diabetes  (gestational diabetes) are at greater risk of developing high blood pressure later in life; however, a healthy diet may significantly reduce that risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Researchers studied 3,818 women with a history of pregnancy-related diabetes enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II as a part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women’s Health Study. Over 22 years of follow-up, 1,069 women developed high blood pressure, which in turn increased their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Factors associated with good Heart Health may also protect Kidneys

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Achieving the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal cardiovascular health may also help prevent chronic kidney disease, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Life’s Simple 7 are the ideal cardiovascular health factors/goals that include healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, diet, body weight, enough physical activity and not smoking.

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

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