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Topic: National Institutes of Health

American Heart Association reports Sugar-Sweetened Drinks linked to increased Visceral Fat

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Data from the Framingham Heart Study — federally supported, ongoing research that has advanced the understanding of cardiovascular disease — showed that among middle-aged adults, there was a direct correlation between greater sweetened beverage consumption and increased visceral fat.

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.. (American Heart Association)

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.. (American Heart Association)

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New statistics from American Heart Association shows one of every three U.S. Deaths caused by Cardiovascular Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One of every three deaths in the U.S. in 2013 were from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, while heart disease and stroke were the No. 1 and No. 2 killers worldwide, according to American Heart Association’s 2016 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update. 

Produced since 1958, the update is created from the most-recent data available and compiled by the AHA, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other government sources.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Education Critical to preventing Sudden Cardiac Arrest

 

Tennessee Coaches Required to Complete Sudden Cardiac Arrest Course

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Tennessee parents and coaches will be learning more about sudden cardiac arrest, the leading cause of death among student athletes.

The Tennessee General Assembly passed a new law in April 2015 requiring coaches and parents of athletes 18 years and younger to be informed about the signs and symptoms of sudden cardiac arrest. While this new law takes effect January 1st, 2016, the Tennessee Department of Health has training materials available now online.

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Plus Automated External Defibrillator

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Plus Automated External Defibrillator

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American Heart Association reports Irregular Sleeping Pattern may affect how Teens Eat

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Day-to-day changes in how long your teen sleeps at night might be affecting how much they eat, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle 2015 meeting.

Penn State researchers looked at data on 342 teenagers and analyzed their sleeping habits. On average, they slept about seven hours nightly. But when the amount of time teens slept varied by an hour – whether it was less sleep or more.

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American Heart Association says pedometer step count better than physical activity self-reports for predicting weight loss

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Using a pedometer to count steps is an easy and accessible way to accurately measure physical activity and may be a better predictor of weight loss than self-reported physical activity, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle 2015 meeting.

Researchers compared the associations between self-reported physical activity, pedometer step count measurements and weight loss to determine if pedometers might offer a better way to measure some aspects of physical activity.

Pedometer. (American Heart Association)

Pedometer. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Older Adults with limited mobility may lessen Heart Problems with Activity

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Older adults with limited mobility may lower their risk of heart attack and coronary death for every minute of physical activity, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Reducing time spent being sedentary even by engaging in low-intensity activities could have important cardiovascular benefits for older adults with mobility limitations,” said Thomas W. Buford, Ph.D., senior author of the study and director of the Health Promotion Center of the University of Florida Institute on Aging in Gainesville, Florida.

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says seeing doctor twice a year helps keep Blood Pressure under control

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who visited their doctor at least twice a year were 3.2 times more likely to keep their blood pressure under control than those who saw their doctor once a year or less, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Having healthcare insurance and getting treated for high cholesterol also increased the likelihood of keeping blood pressure under control.

Blood pressure kiosk at work. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure kiosk at work. (American Heart Association)

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Diabetes, Cardiovascular-Disease Patients should pursue regular hearing checks

 

Center For AudiologyClarksville, TN – The prevalence of hearing loss increases with every decade of age and is closely tied to several ailments, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

A 2008 study by the National Institutes of Health revealed that hearing loss is about twice as common in those with diabetes compared to those without, and a 2005 Harvard study found that hearing loss occurs about 54% more often in those with heart disease compared to the general population.

Dr. LeJeune of the Center for Audiology administering a hearing test.

Dr. LeJeune of the Center for Audiology administering a hearing test.

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American Heart Association says Women want Doctors’ help in facing fears about Sex after Heart Attack

 

Despite fears of another heart attack or dying, many started having sex within a month after their heart attack.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women think it would be easier to overcome their fears of sex after having a heart attack if their doctors gave them more information, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Most women don’t have discussions with their doctors about resuming sex after a heart attack even though many experience fear or other sexual problems,” said Emily M. Abramsohn, M.P.H., the study’s lead author and a researcher at the University of Chicago. “We wanted to get a better understanding of women’s sexual recovery and how it could be improved.” «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Genetic “off switch” linked to increased risk factors for Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Risk of heart and blood vessel disease may increase when a particular gene is switched off, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Emerging Science Series Webinar.

Two known biomarkers are high blood levels of certain fats – low-density lipoproteins (“bad” cholesterol) and high triglycerides. Another recognized biomarker is a protein called adiponectin, which is made in fat tissue and helps regulate the process of turning food into energy. At low levels it is associated with increased disease risk. «Read the rest of this article»

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