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Topic: Clot

American Heart Association says Prompt Clot-Grabbing Treatment produces better Stroke Outcomes

 

American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Clot removal may be beneficial up to 24 hours following stroke in carefully selected patients, but every hour delayed after symptoms begin may be associated with more disability, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

A clot within a blood vessel interrupting blood flow to the brain. (American Heart Association)

A clot within a blood vessel interrupting blood flow to the brain. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association says Receiving a Clot-Buster Drug before reaching the Hospital may Reduce Stroke Disability

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – Stroke patients receiving clot-busting medications before arriving at the hospital have a lower risk for disability afterward, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

Researchers analyzed results from 658 stroke patients who were treated with tPA – a drug that dissolves blood clots. About half of the participants received the clot-busting drug at the hospital, and half received it while still in the ambulance.

The study suggests that ambulances with the personnel and equipment capable of diagnosing ischemic stroke may be worth the extra cost, due to the decrease in patient disability afterward. (American Heart Association)

The study suggests that ambulances with the personnel and equipment capable of diagnosing ischemic stroke may be worth the extra cost, due to the decrease in patient disability afterward. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association urges everyone to learn ‘FAST’ response to stroke for World Stroke Day

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When punch dribbled out of the side of Dan Merritt’s mouth during a Halloween celebration at his daughter’s house, his wife quickly recognized stroke signs and drove him to the hospital.

“In hindsight, we did the right thing, the wrong way,” Barbara Merritt said. “We should have called 911 right away. Fortunately, Dan’s story turned out okay, but we know we got incredibly lucky.”

World Stroke Day 2016 Infographic. (American Stroke Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Stroke Association reports Imaging, not Time, may determine who is right for Stroke Clot Removal

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Brain imaging may accurately identify patients likely to benefit from stroke clot removal instead of relying on the time since symptoms began as an indicator of treatment eligibility, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

An ischemic stroke is caused by lack of blood reaching part of the brain. Endovascular treatment – which mechanically removes the blood clot blocking the path to the brain – benefits patients when performed within six hours of symptom onset. Drug treatment to bust the clot is beneficial up to 4.5 hours.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says poor response to Cholesterol Drugs may indicate blocked Arteries

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – If your “bad” cholesterol level stays the same or increases after you take statin drugs, you may have more blocked arteries than people whose levels drop, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered the “bad” cholesterol because it contributes to plaque buildup, thick, hard deposit that can clog arteries and make them less flexible. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says that in mild strokes, ultra-early treatment may eliminate risk of disability

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In the case of mild or moderate strokes, getting treatment ultra-fast – within 90 minutes of experiencing symptoms – greatly reduces the risk of suffering disability, according to a new study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommends getting to a hospital within three hours of the onset of stroke symptoms. According to guidelines, clot-busting drugs may be given to treat stroke up to  4.5 hours after the onset of symptoms.

Think FAST

Think FAST

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American Heart Association says despite benefit, hospitals alerted about incoming stroke patients only 2/3 of the time

 

Researchers say improved stroke care systems can address geographical and other factors affecting EMS pre-notification.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Treatment is delivered faster when emergency medical services (EMS) personnel notify hospitals a possible stroke patient is en route, yet pre-notification doesn’t occur nearly one-third of the time.

That’s according to two separate Get With The Guidelines®– Stroke program studies published in American Heart Association journals.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommends EMS notify hospitals of incoming stroke patients to allow stroke teams to prepare for prompt evaluation and treatment. «Read the rest of this article»

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Ischemic Stroke Hospitalizations decline in middle aged and elderly, but increase in young

 

American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – The number of acute ischemic stroke hospitalizations among middle-aged and older men and women fell between 1994 and 2007, but sharply increased among those under age 35 — including teens and children — according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2011.

Analysts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reviewing hospitalization data by age and gender, identified declining rates of 51 percent in girls 0-4 years and 25 percent in men and 29 percent in women over 45. «Read the rest of this article»

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