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American Stroke Association reports Counties with Dirtier Air have more Stroke Deaths

 

American Stroke Association

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In a nationwide study, counties with dirtier air had higher rates of stroke deaths and shorter life expectancies, according to preliminary research to be presented in Honolulu at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2019, a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease.

Researchers examined the average yearly levels air pollution (PM2.5) that contains fine inhalable particles.

About half of U.S. counties have annual air pollution levels that exceed guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency. (American Heart Association)

About half of U.S. counties have annual air pollution levels that exceed guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency. (American Heart Association)

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NASA reports new Study looks at Poor Air Quality and its effects on masking Global Warming

 

Written by Abigail Nastan
MISR Communications and Applications Specialist

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – During the 20th century, the average temperature of the continental United States rose by almost 1 degree Fahrenheit (0.5 degree Celsius) — everywhere, that is, except in the Southeast.

There, until the 1980s, the temperature actually decreased slightly. Climate scientists dubbed this peculiar phenomenon the “warming hole,” and it was the cause of much speculation. But beginning in the 1990s, temperatures in the Southeast began to warm again, and in the early years of the 21st century this warming has accelerated.

Looking through smog in downtown Atlanta from midtown. (CC BY-SA 2.0, by Flickr user Ben Ramsey)

Looking through smog in downtown Atlanta from midtown. (CC BY-SA 2.0, by Flickr user Ben Ramsey)

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NASA Scientists use satellite data to find Methane Hot Spot in United States

 

Written by Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – One small “hot spot” in the U.S. Southwest is responsible for producing the largest concentration of the greenhouse gas methane seen over the United States – more than triple the standard ground-based estimate — according to a new study of satellite data by scientists at NASA and the University of Michigan.

Methane is very efficient at trapping heat in the atmosphere and, like carbon dioxide, it contributes to global warming. The hot spot, near the Four Corners intersection of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, covers only about 2,500 square miles (6,500 square kilometers), or half the size of Connecticut.

The Four Corners area (red) is the major U.S. hot spot for methane emissions in this map showing how much emissions varied from average background concentrations from 2003-2009 (dark colors are lower than average; lighter colors are higher). (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Michigan)

The Four Corners area (red) is the major U.S. hot spot for methane emissions in this map showing how much emissions varied from average background concentrations from 2003-2009 (dark colors are lower than average; lighter colors are higher). (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Michigan)

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NASA Scientists link Industrial Soot to Abrupt Retreat of 19th Century Glaciers

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – A NASA-led team of scientists has uncovered strong evidence that soot from a rapidly industrializing Europe caused the abrupt retreat of mountain glaciers in the European Alps that began in the 1860s, a period often thought of as the end of the Little Ice Age.

The research, published September 3rd in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may help resolve a longstanding scientific debate.

This photo from summer 2012 looking south into the Bernese Alps shows how air pollution in the Alps tends to be confined to lower altitudes, concentrating the deposition of soot and dust on the lower slopes. At center left in the picture, a glacier can be seen extending from a high-altitude snow field, above the pollution layer, down into the valley where its lower reach is bathed in pollutants. (Image credit: Peter Holy)

This photo from summer 2012 looking south into the Bernese Alps shows how air pollution in the Alps tends to be confined to lower altitudes, concentrating the deposition of soot and dust on the lower slopes. At center left in the picture, a glacier can be seen extending from a high-altitude snow field, above the pollution layer, down into the valley where its lower reach is bathed in pollutants. (Image credit: Peter Holy)

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office offers Tips to be Safe while Camping this Summer

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – As Tennesseans pack up and head out to their favorite campsites, the State Fire Marshal’s Office urges campers to be aware of carbon monoxide dangers in and around tents and RVs.

Carbon monoxide (CO), often called “the silent killer,” is an invisible, odorless gas created when fuels (such as kerosene, gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil, and methane) burn incompletely. Carbon monoxide can result from camping equipment, such as barbecue grills, portable generators or other fuel-powered devices.

Going camping? Be aware of Carbon Monoxide Dangers

Going camping? Be aware of Carbon Monoxide Dangers

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal issues warning about carbon monoxide risks in the fall

 

Steer clear of carbon monoxide hazards this fall

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, each year in America more than 150 people die from accidental, non-fire related carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning associated with consumer products.

These products include faulty, improperly used or incorrectly vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces.

CO, often called “the silent killer,” is a gas you cannot see, taste, or smell. It can be created when fossil fuels, such as kerosene, gasoline, coal, natural gas, propane, methane or wood do not burn properly. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office provides Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips for Campers

 

Going Camping? Add carbon monoxide risk to safety precaution list

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – As Tennesseans pack up and head out to their favorite campsites, the State Fire Marshal’s Office urges campers to be aware of carbon monoxide dangers in and around tents and RVs.

Carbon monoxide (CO), often called “the silent killer,” is an invisible, odorless gas created when fuels (such as kerosene, gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil, and methane) burn incompletely. Carbon monoxide can result from a number of camping equipment, such as including barbecue grills, portable generators or other fuel-powered devices. «Read the rest of this article»

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Environmental Group Responds to BP Oil Spill

 

Nashville, TN — The Sustainable Tennessee coalition will discuss the Oil Spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico and develop recommendations for actions Tennessee residents can take in response to this crisis at a meeting to be scheduled this August in Nashville. 

“This is the one of worst environmental disasters our nation has faced, and it has direct impact for residents of Tennessee,” said Don Safer, Board Chair for the Tennessee Environmental Council. “Tennesseans are concerned and outraged about the situation.  We have a huge number of residents who moved here after Hurricane Katrina, and many of us have family and friends in the Gulf area, so it is truly personal for us.”

Sustainable Tennessee was founded in 2007 and created a statewide Sustainability Agenda from the input of a broad coalition of citizens, conservation groups, environmental policy experts, elected officials, and representatives of private businesses, industry, and educational institutions. “We believe the crisis in the Gulf is a call to Tennesseans to be more serious about changing the way we live to a more sustainable lifestyle,” said Mary Mastin, Board Secretary, Tennessee Environmental Council, “And the Sustainable Tennessee Agenda is a roadmap to get there.”  «Read the rest of this article»

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TVA hikes electric rates by 20%

 

On the heels of fluctuations in gas prices and a surge in the cost of groceries and most household goods delivered to area stores comes another hit: a hike in the price of electricity. Both CDE Lightband and CEMC rates will jump 20% following a decision by the Tennessee Valley Authority on Wednesday.

TVA directors approved a 17% fuel cost adjustment and an additional power base rate increase of 3%. For the average household using 1,320 kilowatt hours, that translates to an additional $15 a month. The rates will show up on customers’ October billing cycle. This increase is the largest increase since 1974. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Business, News | 1 Comment »
 

Clean energy at Rossview Elementary

 

As we are all painfully aware, energy prices are accelerating upward. Geothermal energy is a clean alternative source. Geo-thermal simply means the earth’s underground heat. The U.S. Department of Energy says geothermal energy can provide “a stronger economy, a cleaner environment, and a more secure energy future for our nation”.

Our county wisely decided to use geothermal heat/air systems at Rossview High, the central office and West Creek Elementary School. The choice to use geothermal when building the new Rossview Elementary school – instead of electric energy from burning coal – is in the hands of our Montgomery County Commissioners. They will vote on this issue on Monday, April 14. A geothermal system will be cost effective overall and better for the environment. «Read the rest of this article»

 



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