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Topic: Sudden Cardiac Death

American Heart Association says Wearable Defibrillators may be an alternative to Surgically Implanted Device for children with certain heart rhythm disorders

 

American Heart Association Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Wearable cardioverter defibrillators – vest-like devices that deliver electric shocks to interrupt a dangerous heart rhythm – may be a safe and effective alternative to surgically implanted devices in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death, according to new research published in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, an American Heart Association journal.

Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted . (American Heart Association)

Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted . (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Gene Editing Technology may improve accuracy of predicting individuals’ Heart Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Scientists may now be able to predict whether carrying a specific genetic variant increases a person’s risk for disease using gene editing and stem cell technologies, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

For the first time, the study demonstrates the unique potential of combining stem cell-based disease modeling (Induced pluripotent stem cells) and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing technology as a personalized risk-assessment platform for determining the disease-causing ability of a yet undescribed genetic variant, known as a “variant of uncertain significance” or VUS.

Gene-editing technology may help scientists discern whether genetic variations with undetermined effects are harmless or dangerous. (American Heart Association)

Gene-editing technology may help scientists discern whether genetic variations with undetermined effects are harmless or dangerous. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Studying Heart Disease after Death can help the Living

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Autopsy is often an overlooked source of medical insight which may be hindering advances in cardiovascular medicine, according to new research published in a special issue of the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Autopsy is a source of discovery that informs the way we think about disease systemically,” said Jeffrey E. Saffitz, M.D., Ph.D., co-editor of the special issue and chair of the department of pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.”

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Shock from Heart Device often triggers further Health Care needs

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A shock from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may trigger an increase in health care needs for many people, regardless whether the shock was medically necessary, according to a new study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

ICDs save people from sudden cardiac death by delivering a shock to restore a normal rhythm when the lower chambers of their heart, or ventricles, beat erratically.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association New Report Outlines Ten Measures for the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death according

 

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Clinical Performance and Quality Measures

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new report presents 10 quality and performance measures that are intended to help stakeholders—including health systems, legislative bodies, and nongovernmental organizations, as well as healthcare practitioners, patients, families and communities—in the effort to prevent sudden cardiac death.

The joint report from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association is published online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Sudden cardiac death is an unexpected death due to the sudden cessation of cardiac activity, which is also known as sudden cardiac arrest. (American Heart Association)

Sudden cardiac death is an unexpected death due to the sudden cessation of cardiac activity, which is also known as sudden cardiac arrest. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Yo-Yo Dieting Dangerous even if you’re not Overweight

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Repeatedly losing and regaining weight, known as weight cycling or yo-yo dieting, may increase the risk of death from heart disease among postmenopausal women who were of normal weight at the start of the study, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Normal weight postmenopausal women at the start of the study who lost and regained weight had: 3 and ½ times higher risk for sudden cardiac death and nearly 66% increased risk for coronary heart disease death. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Men may face high lifetime risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – About one in every nine men will experience sudden cardiac death, most before age 70, as well as about one in 30 women, according to research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Sudden cardiac death claims up to 450,000 American lives each year, according to the study and most commonly occurs in people with no prior symptoms of cardiovascular disease.

One in nine men may be at higher risk of premature death due to sudden cardiac death – usually with no warning. One in 30 women may face the same risk. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Wearable defibrillator may be an alternative to ICD for some patients; more research needed

 

This is the American Heart Association’s first science advisory on the wearable automatic defibrillator.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A wearable automatic defibrillator may be an option for patients who are at risk for life-threatening heart rhythm abnormalities but are not good candidates for an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD), according to an advisory from the American Heart Association, published in its Circulation journal.

The light-weight device is worn under street clothes, and, like an ICD, it is designed to provide around-the-clock monitoring of erratic heart rhythms that could result in sudden cardiac death, and when appropriate, provide an electric shock to return the heart to a normal rhythm.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Living near major roads may increase risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Living close to a major road may increase women’s risk of dying from sudden cardiac death, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“It’s important for healthcare providers to recognize that environmental exposures may be under-appreciated risk factors for diseases such as sudden cardiac death and fatal coronary heart disease,” said Jaime E. Hart, Sc.D., study lead author and an instructor in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts. “On a population level, living near a major roadway was as important a risk factor as smoking, diet or obesity.”

Living near a major road was associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death in women. (American Heart Association)

Living near a major road was associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death in women. (American Heart Association)

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