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Topic: Tet Offensive

101st Airborne Division Soldiers involved in famous Vietnam photo interviewed for first time since image was taken 49 years ago

 

Written by 1st Lt. Daniel Johnson
2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

2nd Brigade Combat Team - StrikeFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell, KY – In April 1968, Associated Press photographer Art Greenspon took a photograph widely considered to be one of the most telling photos of the Vietnam War that is now titled “Help From Above.”

Embedded with the Soldiers of Company A, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, Greenspon caught the moment after an ambush where Soldiers from the company were moving casualties to a landing zone to be evacuated. Among other honors, the image inspired the poster for the Vietnam War Movie ‘Platoon’ and graces the covers books and front pages of newspapers.

A copy of “Help From Above”, which hangs in the headquarters of 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division(Air Assault). The photo was donated by Art Greenspon to the 101st when he was inducted as an honorary member of the 327th Infantry Regiment in 2014. Greenspon identified the names and positions of the Soldiers in the photo. Sgt. Maj Watson Baldwin stands with his hands raised signaling to a helicopter. Spc. 4 Dallas Brown lays on the ground grimacing in pain. Sgt. Tim Wintenburg, helmetless on the far right, glances back at the camera. (Original Photo by Art Greenspon, Associated Press, April, 1968. U.S Army Photo by 1st Lt. Daniel Johnson)

A copy of “Help From Above”, which hangs in the headquarters of 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division(Air Assault). The photo was donated by Art Greenspon to the 101st when he was inducted as an honorary member of the 327th Infantry Regiment in 2014. Greenspon identified the names and positions of the Soldiers in the photo. Sgt. Maj Watson Baldwin stands with his hands raised signaling to a helicopter. Spc. 4 Dallas Brown lays on the ground grimacing in pain. Sgt. Tim Wintenburg, helmetless on the far right, glances back at the camera. (Original Photo by Art Greenspon, Associated Press, April, 1968. U.S Army Photo by 1st Lt. Daniel Johnson)

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5th Special Forces Group “Legion” dedicates building at Fort Campbell to Medal of Honor recipient Drew Dix

 

Written by Sgt. Justin Moell
5th Special Forces Group (Airborne) Public Affairs Office

5th Special ForcesFort Campbell, KY – Awarded for personal acts of valor, above and beyond the call of duty, the highest award a Soldier can earn during combat is the Medal of Honor.

Retired U.S. Army Maj. Drew D. Dix, native of Pueblo, CO, was awarded the Medal of Honor from President Lyndon B. Johnson on January 19th, 1969, for repeatedly leading a 20-man force of local fighters in to Chau Phu, Vietnam, multiple times, driving out the Viet Cong resulting in 14 confirmed Viet Cong Killed in action and a potential 25 more, the rescue of 14 United States and free world civilians, and capturing 20 enemy combatants, including a high ranking Viet Cong official, during the early days of the Tet Offensive.

(L to R) Col. John W. Brennan, commander of the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), retired Maj. Drew Dix, Medal of Honor recipient and former member of the 5th SFG(A), Lt. Col. Joseph Lock, commander of 4th Battalion, 5th SFG(A) and Maj. Gen. Gary J. Volesky, commander of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), stand in front of the plaque dedicating the 4th Bn. special operations complex to Dix, after a ceremony held here July 11, 2014. (Sgt. Justin A. Moeller)

(L to R) Col. John W. Brennan, commander of the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), retired Maj. Drew Dix, Medal of Honor recipient and former member of the 5th SFG(A), Lt. Col. Joseph Lock, commander of 4th Battalion, 5th SFG(A) and Maj. Gen. Gary J. Volesky, commander of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), stand in front of the plaque dedicating the 4th Bn. special operations complex to Dix, after a ceremony held here July 11, 2014. (Sgt. Justin A. Moeller)

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This History of Fort Campbell’s Week of the Eagles

 

2014 Fort Campbell Week of the EaglesFort Campbell, KY – Major General J.H. Cushman hosted Fort Campbell’s first “Week of the Eagles” May 21st-25th, 1973; one year after the 101st was officially welcomed back from Vietnam.

The week was touted as a celebration of the Division’s combat readiness and was held in the same time period as Armed Forces and Memorial Days. The week also featured both a Kentucky Day of the Eagles and a Tennessee Day of the Eagles. Kentucky Governor Wendell Ford and Tennessee Governor Winfield Dunn both visited Fort Campbell to mark the occasions.

Fort Campbell kicks off the Week of the Eagles with a Division Run.

Fort Campbell kicks off the Week of the Eagles with a Division Run.

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101st Airborne Division Week of the Eagles starts August 10th

 

Written by 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Public Affairs

Fort Campbell's Week of the EaglesFort Campbell, KY – The “Screaming Eagles” of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) will host the 2012 Week of the Eagles, August 10th-17th, 2012, at Fort Campbell, KY, to reflect upon all that the division’s Soldiers have achieved since the unit was created with no history, but with a “Rendezvous with Destiny.”

“Week of the Eagles is a time for 101st Soldiers of the past and present to come together and reflect on the great legacy of the 101st Airborne Division,” said Maj. Gen. James C. McConville, commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault).

“This year is particularly significant because it coincides with the 70th anniversary of the division. We invite all Soldiers, families and friends to participate and experience Week of the Eagles 2012.”

2012 Week of the Eagles

2012 Week of the Eagles

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How James Johnson Served and Sacrificed for our Nation

 

Essay Written by Skyler Johnson of  Mahaffey Middle School
As part of the Clarksville Kiwanis Club’s Memories of Service and Sacrifice Project “Interview a Veteran” Contest

My grandfather, James Harvey Johnson, was just a young man, straight out of a small town high school in southeastern Kentucky, when he voluntarily joined the U.S. Army. James made several sacrifices while he served, which has allowed him to be awarded not only a Bronze Star, but also a Purple Heart and many more medals.

It was Friday, May 28th 1966, the last day of high school, when James knew what he had to do; join the Army. That was his only choice since he and his family didn’t have enough money to send him straight to college. When he informed his parents on the decision he was making, they weren’t very emotional because they knew that was what he had to do. Then on June 1st, he went and enlisted in the Army.

Skyler Johnson reads a small part of her essay at the Kiwanis Club's “Interview A Veteran” Essay Contest Winners program Tuesday, November 8th 2011.

Skyler Johnson reads a small part of her essay at the Kiwanis Club's “Interview A Veteran” Essay Contest Winners program Tuesday, November 8th 2011.

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