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Topic: University

Montgomery County Needs 148 Additional TN Promise Mentors

 

Clarksville - Montgomery County Community NewsClarksville, Tn —With the deadline less than three months away, tnAchieves needs an additional 5,000 volunteer mentors across the state to support TN Promise applicants from the Class of 2020. Locally, Montgomery County still needs 148 mentors to meet student demand.

Mentors spend one hour a month assisting students as they transition from high school to college.  They remind students of important deadlines, serve as a trusted college resource and, most importantly, encourage students to reach their full potential.

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NASA’s Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) to help explore the nature of Dark Energy

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Scientists have discovered that a mysterious pressure dubbed “dark energy” makes up about 68% of the total energy content of the cosmos, but so far we don’t know much more about it.

Exploring the nature of dark energy is one of the primary reasons NASA is building the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), a space telescope whose measurements will help illuminate the dark energy puzzle. With a better understanding of dark energy, we will have a better sense of the past and future evolution of the universe.

An artist's rendering of NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), which will study multiple cosmic phenomena, including dark energy. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center)

An artist’s rendering of NASA’s Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), which will study multiple cosmic phenomena, including dark energy. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center)

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NASA’s SOFIA airborne observatory discovers First Type of Molecule that ever formed in the Universe

 

Written by Kassandra Bell and Alison Hawkes
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says the first type of molecule that ever formed in the universe has been detected in space for the first time, after decades of searching. Scientists discovered its signature in our own galaxy using the world’s largest airborne observatory, NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, as the aircraft flew high above the Earth’s surface and pointed its sensitive instruments out into the cosmos.

When the universe was still very young, only a few kinds of atoms existed. Scientists believe that around 100,000 years after the big bang, helium and hydrogen combined to make a molecule called helium hydride for the first time.

Illustration of planetary nebula NGC 7027 and helium hydride molecules. In this planetary nebula, SOFIA detected helium hydride, a combination of helium (red) and hydrogen (blue), which was the first type of molecule to ever form in the early universe. This is the first time helium hydride has been found in the modern universe. (NASA/SOFIA/L. Proudfit/D.Rutter)

Illustration of planetary nebula NGC 7027 and helium hydride molecules. In this planetary nebula, SOFIA detected helium hydride, a combination of helium (red) and hydrogen (blue), which was the first type of molecule to ever form in the early universe. This is the first time helium hydride has been found in the modern universe. (NASA/SOFIA/L. Proudfit/D.Rutter)

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NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captures Ultraviolet Panoramic View of the Universe

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Astronomers using the ultraviolet vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have captured one of the largest panoramic views of the fire and fury of star birth in the distant universe.

The field features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are forming stars. Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, which happened about 3 billion years after the big bang.

Astronomers have just assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history, based on a broad spectrum of observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and other space and ground-based telescopes. (NASA, ESA, P. Oesch (University of Geneva), and M. Montes (University of New South Wales))

Astronomers have just assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history, based on a broad spectrum of observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and other space and ground-based telescopes. (NASA, ESA, P. Oesch (University of Geneva), and M. Montes (University of New South Wales))

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NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope measurements show Universe expanding faster then expected

 

Space Telescope Science Institute

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationBaltimore, MD – Astronomers have used NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to make the most precise measurements of the expansion rate of the universe since it was first calculated nearly a century ago. Intriguingly, the results are forcing astronomers to consider that they may be seeing evidence of something unexpected at work in the universe.

That’s because the latest Hubble finding confirms a nagging discrepancy showing the universe to be expanding faster now than was expected from its trajectory seen shortly after the big bang. Researchers suggest that there may be new physics to explain the inconsistency.

This illustration shows three steps astronomers used to measure the universe's expansion rate (Hubble constant) to an unprecedented accuracy, reducing the total uncertainty to 2.3 percent. The measurements streamline and strengthen the construction of the cosmic distance ladder, which is used to measure accurate distances to galaxies near to and far from Earth. The latest Hubble study extends the number of Cepheid variable stars analyzed to distances of up to 10 times farther across our galaxy than previous Hubble results. (NASA, ESA, A. Feild (STScI), and A. Riess) (STScI/JHU)

This illustration shows three steps astronomers used to measure the universe’s expansion rate (Hubble constant) to an unprecedented accuracy, reducing the total uncertainty to 2.3 percent. The measurements streamline and strengthen the construction of the cosmic distance ladder, which is used to measure accurate distances to galaxies near to and far from Earth. The latest Hubble study extends the number of Cepheid variable stars analyzed to distances of up to 10 times farther across our galaxy than previous Hubble results. (NASA, ESA, A. Feild (STScI), and A. Riess) (STScI/JHU)

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Will Healy Named Eddie Robinson Award Winner

 

APSU FootballChicago, Ill — Austin Peay State University head football coach Will Healy has been named the 2017 Eddie Robinson Award recipient.

The Eddie Robinson Award is named after the legendary Grambling head coach and is given annually to the top coach in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) by STATS. Voting was conducted by a national panel of over 150 media relations and sports information directors, broadcasters, writers and other dignitaries.

APSU Football Coach Wins Eddie Robinson Award.{APSU Sports Information}

APSU Football Coach Wins Eddie Robinson Award.{APSU Sports Information}

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Tennessee to receive grant to boost College Degree Completion Rates

 

Tennessee Board of RegentsNashville, TN – Tennessee was named one of only three states selected to receive a grant valued at $1 million to increase on-time college completion rates.

The grant supports the state’s higher education reform efforts that help students finish a degree in two years from a community college and in four years from a university, saving time and money, and ensuring a higher rate of success.

The award enhances Governor Bill Haslam’s “Drive to 55” initiative to encourage more Tennesseans to earn a college degree or workforce certificate. «Read the rest of this article»

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Fort Campbell’s The Zone to hold Halloween Party October 25th

 

Eat, Drink and be Scary

Fort Campbell's Morale, Welfare and Recreation - MWRFort Campbell, KY – Join MWR at The Zone on October 25th for a great night of entertainment, music, prizes, food and drink. D.J. Johnny from Nashville will be spinning today’s top music and there will be a balloon drop with door prize vouchers in the balloons!

Come dressed in your costume – you might win one of the cash prizes for the costume contest. The party beings at 9:00pm and lasts until 1:00am. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Board of Regents approves Increased Fee/Tuition Rates for State Universities, community Colleges and Technology Centers

 

Tennessee Board of RegentsMemphis, TN – The Tennessee Board of Regents voted to increase tuition and fee rates for the six universities, 13 community colleges and 27 technology centers it governs. The rates of increase are lower this year than in previous years.

The new mandatory and maintenance fee/tuition rates will result in price increases ranging from 3.4 percent at Austin Peay State University to 7.2 percent at East Tennessee State University. Students at the University of Memphis will see a 7 percent increase in price and at Southwest Tennessee Community College will pay 4.8 percent more. «Read the rest of this article»

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