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Fort Campbell’s 1st Brigade Combat Team Quick Reaction Force ready to give Force Protection on a moments notice

 

Written by U.S. Army 1st Lt. Lisa Maginot
1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Forward Operating Base Fenty, Afghanistan – Company B, 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Quick Reaction Force (QRF) train for any potential emergency situation in which their team could be called to assist, protect and defend Coalition Forces on and around Jalalabad Airfield.

U.S. Army Spc. Peter Brousseau, a member of the Forward Operating Base Fenty Quick Reaction Force and the 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, attaches an anchor weight in order to prevent a water supply tank from rolling over. (U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Lisa Maginot, 426th BSB Unit Public Affairs Representative)

U.S. Army Spc. Peter Brousseau, a member of the Forward Operating Base Fenty Quick Reaction Force and the 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, attaches an anchor weight in order to prevent a water supply tank from rolling over. (U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Lisa Maginot, 426th BSB Unit Public Affairs Representative)

Company B’s mission involves both maintenance and force protection. Soldiers are not only expected to continue performing their daily maintenance checks, to include, but not limited to, preventive maintenance checks, pre-combat checks and pre-combat inspections, but they are also expected to perform the QRF responsibilities and mission requirements as well.

“QRF is an interesting additional task,” said Sgt. Kevin Mowery, a QRF truck commander, “It involves everything from reacting to emergency situations to helping provide additional security to the FOB (forward operating base).”

U.S. Army Spc. Peter Brousseau, a member of the Forward Operating Base Fenty Quick Reaction Force and the 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, removes armor plating from an M1120 HEMTT Load Handling System in order to pull the vehicle back onto the road. (U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Lisa Maginot, 426th BSB Unit Public Affairs Representative)“It is a formidable challenge that our Soldiers eagerly take on,” says Mowery, “Our Soldiers work long, strenuous hours as QRF and still manage to keep the FOB operational with their daily maintenance taskings.”

Soldiers of Company B need to be prepared to react to any and all emergent calls. At any given moment, a Bastogne element could call for assistance and these Soldiers are expected to react in a timely manner.

“We take our job very seriously, and our guys train very hard for this mission,” said Sgt. Matthew Smith, a QRF Truck commander, “We take pride in how quickly we are able to respond; always within seven minutes.”

The ability of these Soldiers to accomplish the mission is a direct result of the skills attained in the variety of courses they have attended.

U.S. Army Soldiers, Sgt. James Kendall and Spc. Peter Brousseau, 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), attach chains to the back of an M1120 HEMTT Load Handling System in order to recover the vehicle from a sinkhole. (U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Lisa Maginot, 426th BSB Unit Public Affairs Representative)Company B Soldiers are trained in hasty recovery, Common Remotely Operated Weapon Stations (CROWS), utilizing foreign weapons and a multitude of other duty specific areas.

“The Soldier’s competency is the biggest factor in our success,” said Staff Sgt. Mary Crawford, QRF noncommissioned officer in charge, “We are fortunate because some of our QRF Soldiers are mechanics and they are constantly working in the motorpool, where they maintain proficiency and ensure efficiency on both their mechanic and Soldier skills.

Crawford said, “Our Soldiers are well trained and cohesive, which are traits that are essential in making our elements functional.”


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