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Sunday, May 22, 2022
Home A model of the Space Launch System rocket covered in a thin coat of pink, pressure-sensitive paint is mounted in a wind tunnel at NASA’s Ames Research Center. The high-tech paint acts as a pressure sensor covering the entire surface of the rocket during tests simulating its launch to space. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Dominic Hart) A model of the Space Launch System rocket covered in a thin coat of pink, pressure-sensitive paint is mounted in a wind tunnel at NASA's Ames Research Center. The high-tech paint acts as a pressure sensor covering the entire surface of the rocket during tests simulating its launch to space. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Dominic Hart)

A model of the Space Launch System rocket covered in a thin coat of pink, pressure-sensitive paint is mounted in a wind tunnel at NASA’s Ames Research Center. The high-tech paint acts as a pressure sensor covering the entire surface of the rocket during tests simulating its launch to space. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Dominic Hart)

A model of the Space Launch System rocket covered in a thin coat of pink, pressure-sensitive paint is mounted in a wind tunnel at NASA's Ames Research Center. The high-tech paint acts as a pressure sensor covering the entire surface of the rocket during tests simulating its launch to space. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Dominic Hart)

A model of the Space Launch System rocket covered in a thin coat of pink, pressure-sensitive paint is mounted in a wind tunnel at NASA’s Ames Research Center. The high-tech paint acts as a pressure sensor covering the entire surface of the rocket during tests simulating its launch to space. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Dominic Hart)

This system of fans moves air through the world’s largest wind tunnels, at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley. Each of the six fans is 40 feet in diameter and is driven by a 22,500-horsepower electric motor. Two figures near fan 5 give a sense of scale. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Tom Trower)
An early parachute design for the Mars Science Laboratory landing system was tested in October 2007 inside the world’s largest wind tunnel at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex. In this image, two engineers are dwarfed by the parachute, which measures more than 165 feet in length and opens to a diameter of nearly 55 feet – with only about 12.5 feet of clearance to both the floor and ceiling. (NASA/JPL/Pioneer Aerospace)