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Topic: diet

American Heart Association says High Blood Pressure affects Young, Healthy Medical Students

 

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Almost two-thirds of medical students had above-normal blood pressure and were more than twice as likely to experience clinically high blood pressure compared to the general public, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.  

High blood pressure is typically linked with older age, being overweight, smoking and/or being in general poor health.

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports U.S. Soldiers have worse Heart Health than Civilians

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, active duty Army personnel have worse cardiovascular health compared to people of similar ages in the civilian population.

Researchers compared a group of more than 263,000 active duty Army soldiers, age 17-64, who had a health examination in 2012 with a similar group of U.S. civilians participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2011-2012.

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says New Pediatric Blood Pressure guidelines identify more Kids at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension new guidelines that classified more children as having elevated blood pressure  are better at predicting which kids are likely to develop heart disease when they reach adulthood.

The guidelines were issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2017 and endorsed by the American Heart Association.

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Sugary drinks may be associated with an increased risk of Death from Cardiovascular Diseases

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation, frequently drinking sugar-sweetened drinks, such as sodas and sports drinks, was associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular diseases and, to a lesser extent, cancers

Among study participants the risk of death rose as people drank more sugar-sweetened drinks.

There was an association among people who drank the most sugary drinks and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other causes of death. (American Heart Association)

There was an association among people who drank the most sugary drinks and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other causes of death. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Adding High-Quality Plant-Based Foods to Diet decreases risk of Deaths from Heart Disease and other causes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – As long as you don’t count French fries and soda as healthy choices, it’s never too late to increase your longevity and cut your risk of heart disease death by adding fruits and vegetables to your diet, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2019, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Even in middle age, adding healthy plant foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables to your diet may reduce the risk of death from heart disease and other causes. (American Heart Association)

Even in middle age, adding healthy plant foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables to your diet may reduce the risk of death from heart disease and other causes. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says a Diverse Diet may not be the healthiest one

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Encouraging people to eat a wide variety of foods to ensure they meet all their dietary needs may backfire, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association that provides an overview of recent scientific studies.

“Eating a more diverse diet might be associated with eating a greater variety of both healthy and unhealthy foods” said Marcia C. de Oliveira Otto, Ph.D., lead author of the statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. “Combined, such an eating pattern may lead to increased food consumption and obesity. 

Scientific evidence to date does not support the notion that eating a diverse diet is healthy or promotes a healthy weight. (American Heart Association)

Scientific evidence to date does not support the notion that eating a diverse diet is healthy or promotes a healthy weight. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says most Black Adults have High Blood Pressure before age 55

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Approximately 75 percent of black and men women are likely to develop high blood pressure by the age of 55, compared to 55 percent of white men and 40 percent of white women in the same age range, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Protein Diet associated with small increased Heart Failure Risk in Middle-Aged Men

 

Circulation: Heart Failure Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

Despite the popularity of high protein diets, there is little research about how diets high in protein might impact men’s heart failure risk.

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. (American Heart Association)

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association lists Five Healthy Habits may add more than a decade to life

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, including eating a healthy diet, regular exercise and not smoking, could prolong life expectancy at age 50 by 14 years for women and just over 12 years for men, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

America is one of the wealthiest countries worldwide, yet Americans have a shorter life expectancy compared with other high-income countries, including Japan, Canada and Norway.

A new study suggests that living a healthy lifestyle during adulthood may extend longevity by 14 years for women and 12 years for men. (American Heart Association)

A new study suggests that living a healthy lifestyle during adulthood may extend longevity by 14 years for women and 12 years for men. (American Heart Association)

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Mono-unsaturated fats from plants, not animals may reduce risk of death from heart disease and other causes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Diets rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids from plants were associated with a lower risk of dying from heart disease or other causes compared to diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from animals, which were linked to a higher risk of death from heart disease or other causes, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

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