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Topic: Paynesville Liberia

101st Airborne Division receives second highest unit award for mission to Liberia during Ebola breakout

 

Written by Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Hoskins
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) was awarded the Joint Meritorious Unit Award by the commanding general of U.S. Africa Command, Gen. David M. Rodriquez, during a ceremony held in the division headquarters building here August 27th. The JMUA is the second highest award a unit can receive.

Rodriquez and Maj. Gen. Gary J. Volesky, the commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division, unveiled the award and a campaign streamer, recognizing the division’s five-month deployment in support of the U.S. Agency for International Development-led mission to fight the spread of Ebola in western Africa.

“The day the 101st got into Africa, things started changing,” said Rodriguez. “Every day they were there, the confidence and courage of the Liberian people started picking up.”

Gen. David M. Rodriguez, commanding general, U.S. Africa Command, speaks to the crowd during the Joint Meritorious Unit Award presentation ceremony at McAuliffe Hall August 27, 2015. The JMUA, the second most prestigious award a unit can receive, was presented to the 101st Airborne Division for their humanitarian mission during the Ebola epidemic in Liberia. (Sgt. William White, 101st Airborne Division Public Affairs)

Gen. David M. Rodriguez, commanding general, U.S. Africa Command, speaks to the crowd during the Joint Meritorious Unit Award presentation ceremony at McAuliffe Hall August 27, 2015. The JMUA, the second most prestigious award a unit can receive, was presented to the 101st Airborne Division for their humanitarian mission during the Ebola epidemic in Liberia. (Sgt. William White, 101st Airborne Division Public Affairs)

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101st Airborne Division cases colors, heads home to Fort Campbell after successful mission in Liberia

 

Written by Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Hoskins
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionMonrovia, Liberia – The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) cased its colors in a ceremony February 26th at the Barclay Training Center, Monrovia, Liberia, marking the end of Operation United Assistance for the Joint Forces Command – United Assistance and the Screaming Eagles.

The ceremony signified the successful completion of a five-month deployment to Liberia in support of the U.S. Agency for International Development-led mission to fight the spread of Ebola in western Africa.

The Screaming Eagles led the JFC-UA – the Department of Defense arm of the United State’s effort – was comprised of engineers, medical personnel, logisticians and others, which built Ebola treatment units, trained health care workers to staff the ETUs, and built a logistic infrastructure to supply the ETUs.

A joint color guard present arms, dipping the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) colors, during the playing of the national anthems of Liberia and the U.S. during the 101st’s color casing ceremony held at the Barclay Training Center, Monrovia, Liberia, Feb. 26, 2015. The final color casing represents the completion of the Joint Forces Command - United Assistance mission in Liberia in support of Operation United Assistance. (Spc. Rashene Mincy, 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera))

A joint color guard present arms, dipping the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) colors, during the playing of the national anthems of Liberia and the U.S. during the 101st’s color casing ceremony held at the Barclay Training Center, Monrovia, Liberia, Feb. 26, 2015. The final color casing represents the completion of the Joint Forces Command – United Assistance mission in Liberia in support of Operation United Assistance. (Spc. Rashene Mincy, 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera))

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Fort Campbell’s 86th Combat Support Hospital cases colors in Liberia

 

Written by Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Hoskins
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne Division86th Combat Support HospitalPaynesville, Liberia – The 86th Combat Support Hospital, from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, deployed as Task Force Eagle Medic in support of Operation United Assistance, cased its colors February 12th during a ceremony at the National Police Training Academy, Paynesville.

Task Force Eagle Medic’s main mission in Liberia was to train health care workers to safely work in an Ebola treatment unit where suspected and confirmed Ebola patients receive care.

Maj. Gen. Gary Volesky makes open remarks during 86th Combat Support Hospital’s color casing ceremony at the National Police Training Academy, Paynesville, Liberia, Feb. 12, 2015. The 86th CSH, deployed as Task Force Eagle Medic in support of Operation United Assistance, will head back to Fort Campbell, KY. (Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Hoskins, 101st Airborne Division Public Affairs)

Maj. Gen. Gary Volesky makes open remarks during 86th Combat Support Hospital’s color casing ceremony at the National Police Training Academy, Paynesville, Liberia, Feb. 12, 2015. The 86th CSH, deployed as Task Force Eagle Medic in support of Operation United Assistance, will head back to Fort Campbell, KY. (Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Hoskins, 101st Airborne Division Public Affairs)

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Chaplain’s mission in Liberia very important to U.S. Soldiers

 

Written by Sgt. Ange Desinor
13th Public Affairs Detachment

United States Africa CommandPaynesville, Liberia – Singing, clapping, praying and the reading of words in a Bible are all commonplace in a church service. That scene hasn’t changed, even in Liberia.

Major Alfred Grondski, chaplain for the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 36th Engineer Brigade, provides religious support to all service members at the National Police Training Academy, in support of Operation United Assistance.

“I minister closely with people I work with,” said Grondski, a Trenton, New Jersey, native. “That usually doesn’t happen back in the states like it is here, because in garrison a lot of the Soldiers go to their home church; there isn’t a home church here. This gives us an opportunity to come together as a Family and worship.”

Chaplain Maj. Alfred Grondski, right, a Trenton, N.J., native, of Headquarters and Headquarters Brigade, 36th Engineer Brigade, briefs Soldiers about redeployment stresses they might endure when they get home, during the Operation United Assistance mission, at the National Police Training Academy, Payenesville, Liberia. Dec. 31, 2014. (Sgt. Ange Desinor 13th Public Affairs Detachment)

Chaplain Maj. Alfred Grondski, right, a Trenton, N.J., native, of Headquarters and Headquarters Brigade, 36th Engineer Brigade, briefs Soldiers about redeployment stresses they might endure when they get home, during the Operation United Assistance mission, at the National Police Training Academy, Payenesville, Liberia. Dec. 31, 2014. (Sgt. Ange Desinor 13th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Movement NCO ensures soldiers reach destination in Liberia

 

Written by Sgt. Ange Desinor
13th Public Affairs Detachment

United States Africa CommandPaynesville, Liberia – Vehicles such as a Light Medium Tactical Vehicle wouldn’t be able to safely travel through the rough terrain, rigorous roads and congested traffic of Liberia.

So when 36th Engineer Brigade Soldiers deployed in support of Operation United Assistance have a mission outside of the National Police Training Academy in Paynesville, Liberia, there’s a solution – Staff Sgt. Jose Nieves.

Nieves, a movement noncommissioned officer for Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 36th Engineer Brigade, assigns drivers to the Soldiers going out on missions from the NPTA.

From left, Staff Sgt. Jose Nieves, a Bayamon, Puerto Rico, native and movement noncommissioned officer for Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 36th Engineer Brigade, talks to Haji A. Sheriff, a Liberia, Monrovia native and a driver, about his routes before he goes out on a mission to Buchanan, Liberia, Dec. 27, 2014, from the National Police Training Academy, Paynesville, Liberia, during Operation United Assistance. (Sgt. Ange Desinor, 13th Public Affairs Detachment)

From left, Staff Sgt. Jose Nieves, a Bayamon, Puerto Rico, native and movement noncommissioned officer for Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 36th Engineer Brigade, talks to Haji A. Sheriff, a Liberia, Monrovia native and a driver, about his routes before he goes out on a mission to Buchanan, Liberia, Dec. 27, 2014, from the National Police Training Academy, Paynesville, Liberia, during Operation United Assistance. (Sgt. Ange Desinor, 13th Public Affairs Detachment)

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U.S. Soldiers open Ebola treatment unit in Buchanan, Liberia

 

Written by Sgt. Ange Desinor
13th Public Affairs Detachment

United States Africa CommandPaynesville, Liberia – Singing, clapping and dancing greeted Soldiers of the 36th Engineer Brigade, out of Fort Hood, Texas, as they walked up to a tent to attend the grand opening ceremony of the Ebola treatment unit near Buchanan, Liberia, December 22nd, as part of Operation United Assistance.

The Buchanan ETU was built by the 902nd Engineer Company Soldiers who supported 36th Engineer Brigade, and handed it over to the International Organization for Migration. The Soldiers of the 902nd Engineer Company built the ETU in 22 days. The IOM customized the facility for its needs before opening it to the public.

Dario Gonzalez, left, a medical director with the International Organization for Migration and a native of New York City, explains to Maj. Uzoma Aniniba, a Denver native, and the operations officer for the 36th Engineer Brigade, how the health care workers will archive the patients records electronically, after the grand opening ceremony of the Ebola treatment unit near Buchanan, Liberia, Dec. 22, 2014, as part of Operation United Assistance.  (Sgt. Ange Desinor 13th Public Affairs Detachment)

Dario Gonzalez, left, a medical director with the International Organization for Migration and a native of New York City, explains to Maj. Uzoma Aniniba, a Denver native, and the operations officer for the 36th Engineer Brigade, how the health care workers will archive the patients records electronically, after the grand opening ceremony of the Ebola treatment unit near Buchanan, Liberia, Dec. 22, 2014, as part of Operation United Assistance. (Sgt. Ange Desinor 13th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Behavioral Health helps Soldiers better manage stress in fight against Ebola

 

Written by Capt. Eric Hudson
7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

United States Africa CommandPaynesville, Liberia – It’s a common story for many deployed Soldiers. The stress from their deployment causes problems with their marriages and other relationships, which distracts them from their job as a Soldier. Helping Soldiers deal with that stress is where the Behavioral Health Team can play a vital role.

“We look at the stress levels of the force and help mitigate any symptoms that may be keeping them ineffective, ” said Maj. Alexander Ragan, Behavioral Health Officer for the 36th Engineer Brigade from Fort Hood, Texas.

Maj. Alexander Ragan, Behavior Health Officer for the 36th Engineer Brigade from Fort Hood, Texas speaks to a group of Soldiers about the importance of monitoring your overall health during the deployment to Liberia. Operation United Assistance is a Department of Defense operation in Liberia to provide logistics, training and engineering support to U.S. Agency for International Development-led efforts to contain the Ebola virus outbreak in western Africa. (Capt. Eric Hudson/U.S. Army)

Maj. Alexander Ragan, Behavior Health Officer for the 36th Engineer Brigade from Fort Hood, Texas speaks to a group of Soldiers about the importance of monitoring your overall health during the deployment to Liberia. Operation United Assistance is a Department of Defense operation in Liberia to provide logistics, training and engineering support to U.S. Agency for International Development-led efforts to contain the Ebola virus outbreak in western Africa. (Capt. Eric Hudson/U.S. Army)

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U.S. Department of Defense team conducts weekly Ebola prevention class in Liberia

 

Written by Sgt. Ange Desinor
13th Public Affairs Detachment

United States Africa CommandPaynesville, Liberia – Joint service Soldiers participated in a weekly class to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus. The Department of Defense Ebola Treatment Training Team taught the class in support of Operation United Assistance, at the National Police Training Academy, Monrovia, Liberia, December 2nd, 2014.

“When the Ebola virus started, there weren’t enough health care workers to eradicate it,” said Maj. Retaunda Riley, an Ashmund, Georgia, native, the senior brigade physician assistance for the 36th Engineer Brigade. “With the permission of the Liberian government, we extended our support along with various agencies worldwide to help stop the virus.”

From left, Petty Officer 3rd Class Denzel Eleby, a Key West, Fla., native, Petty Officer 3rd Class Joanna Hambleton, Doyelstown, Pa., both instructors, hands Maj. Retaunda Riley, an Ashmund, Georgia, native, the senior brigade physician assistance with the 36th Engineer Brigade, her equipment for the weekly class offered by the Department of Defense Ebola Treatment Training Team to teach and prevent the spread of the Ebola virus, in support of Operation United Assistance at the National Police Training Academy, Monrovia, Liberia, Dec. 2, 2014. (Sgt. Ange Desinor, 13th Public Affairs Detachment)

From left, Petty Officer 3rd Class Denzel Eleby, a Key West, Fla., native, Petty Officer 3rd Class Joanna Hambleton, Doyelstown, Pa., both instructors, hands Maj. Retaunda Riley, an Ashmund, Georgia, native, the senior brigade physician assistance with the 36th Engineer Brigade, her equipment for the weekly class offered by the Department of Defense Ebola Treatment Training Team to teach and prevent the spread of the Ebola virus, in support of Operation United Assistance at the National Police Training Academy, Monrovia, Liberia, Dec. 2, 2014. (Sgt. Ange Desinor, 13th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Joint Forces Command – United Assistance trains first class of Ebola treatment unit workers

 

By Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Hoskins, Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionMonrovia, Liberia – The Joint Forces Command – United Assistance DoD Ebola Training Team completed training the first class of workers who will staff the Ebola treatment units October 31st at the National Police Training Center, Paynesville.

The training consists of 8 to 10 days of hands-on and classroom instruction split in two phases – cold phase and hot phase.

The cold phase is conducted by the DETT, which is comprised of service members from the Army, Navy and Air Force, and is led by Col. Laura Favand, the DETT chief of training.

The DoD Ebola Training Team, comprised of service members from the Army, Air Force and Navy, train the first class of volunteers who will staff Ebola treatment units in Liberia, Oct. 30, 2014, at the National Police Training Center, Paynesville, Liberia. The facility is set up in stations where the students react to various scenarios they may encounter while caring for Ebola and Ebola-suspected patients. The DETT is part of the Joint Forces Command – United Assistance, which supports the U.S. Agency for International Development in the effort to control the spread of Ebola. (Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Hoskins/U.S. Army)

The DoD Ebola Training Team, comprised of service members from the Army, Air Force and Navy, train the first class of volunteers who will staff Ebola treatment units in Liberia, Oct. 30, 2014, at the National Police Training Center, Paynesville, Liberia. The facility is set up in stations where the students react to various scenarios they may encounter while caring for Ebola and Ebola-suspected patients.  (Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Hoskins/U.S. Army)

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