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BACH reminds everyone that Regular Check-Ups, Lifestyle Choices help to keep a Healthy Heart

 

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH)Fort Campbell, KY – What has four chambers, is about the size of a fist and can mean the difference between life and death? It’s the heart, a vital organ that beats about 100,000 times a day pumping life sustaining blood throughout the body. The human heart is always on duty, pumping 24/7 as long as a person is alive.

Each February is Heart Health Month, a time dedicated to remind individuals about its proper care and maintenance in order to help keep it beating strong.

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TDCI, TDH Urges Consumers to keep New Year’s Resolutions

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Losing weight, stopping smoking and spending more time with friends and loved ones are all popular New Year’s resolutions. Those resolutions aren’t just good for your health; they can be good for your finances, too.

Studies have shown that living a healthy lifestyle can also save you money on insurance costs and physicians’ bills.

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American Heart Association says E-cigarettes take serious toll on Heart Health, Not Safer than Traditional Cigarettes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research that will be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019, November 16th-18th in Philadelphia,  E-cigarette use takes a serious toll on heart health — a big concern given the high prevalence of e-cigarettes and perception of e-cigarettes as a healthier alternative to traditional cigarettes.

E-cigarettes negatively impact the heart’s blood flow — possibly more chronically so than traditional cigarettes. (American Heart Association)

E-cigarettes negatively impact the heart’s blood flow — possibly more chronically so than traditional cigarettes. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Blood Pressure affects Young, Healthy Medical Students

 

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Almost two-thirds of medical students had above-normal blood pressure and were more than twice as likely to experience clinically high blood pressure compared to the general public, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.  

High blood pressure is typically linked with older age, being overweight, smoking and/or being in general poor health.

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports U.S. Soldiers have worse Heart Health than Civilians

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, active duty Army personnel have worse cardiovascular health compared to people of similar ages in the civilian population.

Researchers compared a group of more than 263,000 active duty Army soldiers, age 17-64, who had a health examination in 2012 with a similar group of U.S. civilians participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2011-2012.

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Women need to Make Health a Top Priority

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health joins the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Women’s Health in celebrating National Women’s Health Week May 12th – 18th, 2019.

This nationwide initiative brings awareness to the importance of women’s health and empowers women to take small, manageable steps for longer, healthier and happier lives.

National Women's Health Week is May 12th-18th, 2019.

National Women’s Health Week is May 12th-18th, 2019.

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American Heart Association says Cigarette Smoking associated with increased risk of Peripheral Artery Disease in African Americans

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African Americans who smoke cigarettes are more likely than those who don’t smoke to develop peripheral artery disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a narrowing of arteries other then those directly serving the heart.

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says In-Womb Air Pollution Exposure associated with Higher Blood Pressure in Childhood

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during the third trimester of their mother’s pregnancy had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) is a form of air pollution produced by motor vehicles and the burning of oil, coal and biomass, and has been shown to enter the circulatory system and negatively affect human health.

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Bariatric Surgery for Severely Obese Teens may help prevent Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Bariatric surgery is predicted to cut in half the risk of premature heart disease and stroke in teens with severe obesity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The researchers used a model based on research from the Framingham Heart Study that predicts the likelihood of heart disease events over a 30-year period.

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Middle-aged Tooth loss linked to increased Coronary Heart Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Losing two or more teeth in middle age is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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