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Topic: Astronauts

NASA’s Orion Crew Survival System spacesuit Equipped for the Unexpected on Artemis Missions

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – When NASA astronauts are hours away from launching on Artemis missions to the Moon, they’ll put on a brightly colored orange spacesuit called the Orion Crew Survival System (OCSS) suit. It is designed for a custom fit and equipped with safety technology and mobility features to help protect astronauts on launch day, in emergency situations, high-risk parts of missions near the Moon, and during the high-speed return to Earth.

Many missions require two spacesuits – one worn outside a spacecraft during spacewalks that is designed as a self-contained personal spaceship, and another worn inside a spacecraft during high-risk parts of a mission, such as inside Orion during launch and reentry through Earth’s atmosphere.

NASA is building the Orion Crew Survival System spacesuit to protect astronauts during launch, reentry and emergency situations during Artemis missions. (NASA)

NASA is building the Orion Crew Survival System spacesuit to protect astronauts during launch, reentry and emergency situations during Artemis missions. (NASA)

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NASA engineers Next Generation Spacesuit for the Artemis Generation of Astronauts

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – At first glance, NASA’s new spacesuit that will be worn on Artemis missions might look like the suits that astronauts use for spacewalks outside the International Space Station today.

However, 21st century moonwalkers will be able to accomplish much more complex tasks than their predecessors, thanks to strides in technological advances that started even before the Apollo program.

NASA's Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit, or xEMU spacesuit design provides greater mobility for the Artemis astronauts who will be working on the Moon. (NASA)

NASA’s Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit, or xEMU spacesuit design provides greater mobility for the Artemis astronauts who will be working on the Moon. (NASA)

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NASA looks to understand Asthma from Space

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says help may be on the way for the millions of people around the world who suffer from asthma. Pioneering research in orbit is opening new avenues to understanding what goes wrong in patients with airway inflammation.

The results have contributed to the development of quick lung tests for an improved quality of life––both on Earth and in space. With each lungful of air, our bodies absorb oxygen and exhale waste products. In people with asthma, inflammation in the lung adds nitric oxide to exhaled air. Doctors measure the amount of nitric oxide exhaled by patients to help diagnose inflamed lungs and asthma.

Astronaut Alexander Gerst exhales into an ultra-sensitive gas analyzer for the Airway Monitoring experiment. (NASA)

Astronaut Alexander Gerst exhales into an ultra-sensitive gas analyzer for the Airway Monitoring experiment. (NASA)

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NASA Artemis Missions gets Boost to the Moon from Kentucky Companies

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – When NASA astronauts set foot on the Moon’s surface in 2024, men and women across Kentucky can say they helped to make it possible.

NASA recognized three Kentucky businesses — Parker Hannifin Corp., American Synthetic Rubber Co., a Michelin company; and Eckart America Corp. — in Lexington and Louisville September 18th-19th for their continued support in supplying critical elements and tools for the twin solid rocket boosters of NASA’s powerful Space Launch System (SLS) rocket.

Retired NASA astronaut Col. William “Bill” McArthur, along with NASA and Northrop Grumman personnel, view a test splice of the material used for an elastomer sealing at Parker Hannifin Corp., in Lexington, Kentucky, Sept. 18. Parker Hannifin’s O-ring and Engineered Seals Division provides elastomer sealing that is a key component for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket boosters. (NASA)

Retired NASA astronaut Col. William “Bill” McArthur, along with NASA and Northrop Grumman personnel, view a test splice of the material used for an elastomer sealing at Parker Hannifin Corp., in Lexington, Kentucky, Sept. 18. Parker Hannifin’s O-ring and Engineered Seals Division provides elastomer sealing that is a key component for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket boosters. (NASA)

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NASA Orion Spacecraft to undergo extreme Space Conditions tests

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationCleveland, OH – NASA’ Orion spacecraft for Artemis I will head to Ohio for the final stretch of major testing before integration with the Space Launch System rocket for launch.

Slated to begin this fall, a team of engineers and technicians stand ready to test the spacecraft, consisting of the crew and service modules, under simulated extreme in-space conditions in the world’s premier space environments test facility at NASA’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio.

The Heat Flux System stands ready in the Space Environments Complex thermal vacuum chamber ahead of Artemis I testing at NASA’s Plum Brook Station. (NASA)

The Heat Flux System stands ready in the Space Environments Complex thermal vacuum chamber ahead of Artemis I testing at NASA’s Plum Brook Station. (NASA)

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NASA’s Artemis Lunar Exploration Program

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA is committed to landing American astronauts, including the first woman and the next man, on the Moon by 2024. Through the agency’s Artemis lunar exploration program, we will use innovative new technologies and systems to explore more of the Moon than ever before.

NASA will collaborate with their commercial and international partners to establish sustainable missions by 2028. And then we will use what we learn on and around the Moon to take the next giant leap – sending astronauts to Mars.

Artist's concept of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule prepared for launch. (NASA)

Artist’s concept of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule prepared for launch. (NASA)

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NASA Pathfinder CubeSat to orbit Moon in same orbit projected for Gateway

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA has awarded a $13.7 million contract to Advanced Space of Boulder, Colorado, to develop and operate a CubeSat mission to the same lunar orbit targeted for Gateway – an orbiting outpost astronauts will visit before descending to the surface of the Moon in a landing system as part of NASA’s Artemis program.

The Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE) is expected to be the first spacecraft to operate in a near rectilinear halo orbit around the Moon.

Highly elliptical, a near rectilinear halo orbit around the Moon takes advantage of a precise balance point in the gravities of Earth and the Moon and creates a stability that is ideal for long-term missions like Gateway. (Advanced Space)

Highly elliptical, a near rectilinear halo orbit around the Moon takes advantage of a precise balance point in the gravities of Earth and the Moon and creates a stability that is ideal for long-term missions like Gateway. (Advanced Space)

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American Heart Association says NASA Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they Exercise in Space

 

Findings May Help Others with Fainting Issues

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly 50 years after man’s first steps on the moon, researchers have discovered a way that may help NASA astronauts spending prolonged time in space come back to Earth on more stable footing, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“One of the biggest problems since the inception of the manned space program has been that astronauts have fainted when they came down to Earth ,” said Benjamin Levine, M.D., the study’s senior author who is professor of Exercise Sciences at UT Southwestern Medical Center and director of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.

Former Canadian Astronaut Robert “Bob” Thirsk wearing device which continuously measures blood pressure. (NASA)

Former Canadian Astronaut Robert “Bob” Thirsk wearing device which continuously measures blood pressure. (NASA)

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NASA’s Artemis lunar exploration program

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA is committed to landing American astronauts, including the first woman and the next man, on the Moon by 2024.

Through the agency’s Artemis lunar exploration program, we will use innovative new technologies and systems to explore more of the Moon than ever before.

NASA will collaborate with their commercial and international partners to establish sustainable missions by 2028. And then we will use what we learn on and around the Moon to take the next giant leap – sending astronauts to Mars.

Artist's concept of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule prepared for launch. (NASA)

Artist’s concept of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule prepared for launch. (NASA)

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NASA wants to send Astronauts to Moon’s South Pole

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA says south pole region of the moon is home to some of the most extreme environments in the solar system: it’s unimaginably cold, massively cratered, and has areas that are either constantly bathed in sunlight or in darkness. This is precisely why NASA wants to send astronauts there in 2024 as part of its Artemis program.

The most enticing feature of this southernmost region is the craters, some of which never see the light of day reach their floors. The reason for this is the low angle of sunlight striking the surface at the poles.

A permanently shadowed lunar crater. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center)

A permanently shadowed lunar crater. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center)

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