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Topic: Atherosclerosis

American Heart Association says better options needed for Children at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXObesity and severe obesity in childhood and adolescence have been added to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk for premature heart disease, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (American Heart Association)

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Older Adults who get physical can lower their Heart Disease Risk

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in light to vigorous physical activity, benefit with healthier levels of heart and vessel disease markers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The results from increased physical activity were found to be particularly good among women.

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. (American Heart Association)

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Being Overweight may change Young Adults’ Heart Structure, Function

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Even as a young adult, being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for heart disease later in life, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

The study is the first to explore if higher body mass index (BMI) – a weight-for-height index – results in adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in young adults.

Being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and changes to the heart’s structure, even in young adults. (American Heart Association)

Being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and changes to the heart’s structure, even in young adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Studying Heart Disease after Death can help the Living

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Autopsy is often an overlooked source of medical insight which may be hindering advances in cardiovascular medicine, according to new research published in a special issue of the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Autopsy is a source of discovery that informs the way we think about disease systemically,” said Jeffrey E. Saffitz, M.D., Ph.D., co-editor of the special issue and chair of the department of pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.”

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Higher Thyroid Hormone Levels associated with Artery Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – High and high-normal levels of a thyroid hormone called FT4, were associated with artery disease and death in elderly and middle-aged people, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

Researchers analyzed data from 9,420 participants (average age 65, 57 percent women) in the Rotterdam Study looking at data on two types of hormones: thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine (known as FT4) and their link to atherosclerosis and death due to coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease or other artery-related illness.

High and high-normal levels of a thyroid hormone called free thyroxine or FT4, were associated with artery disease and death in elderly and middle-aged people. (American Heart Association)

High and high-normal levels of a thyroid hormone called free thyroxine or FT4, were associated with artery disease and death in elderly and middle-aged people. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven steps to keep your Brain Healthy from Childhood to Old Age

 

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Presidential Advisory

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A healthy lifestyle benefits your brain as much as the rest of your body — and may lessen the risk of cognitive decline (a loss of the ability to think well) as you age, according to a new advisory from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Both the heart and brain need adequate blood flow, but in many people, blood vessels slowly become narrowed or blocked over the course of their life, a disease process known as atherosclerosis, the cause of many heart attacks and strokes.

Improving your health status with Life’s Simple 7 may reduce the risk of dementia caused by strokes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. (American Heart Association)

Improving your health status with Life’s Simple 7 may reduce the risk of dementia caused by strokes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Disadvantaged Kids may be at higher risk for Heart Disease later in life

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in adults may indicate higher risk for heart attack and stroke in later life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The carotid arteries supply blood to the brain. An ultrasound test of the arteries’ inner layers, the intima and media, may detect the early development of atherosclerosis, or “hardening of the arteries,” which underlies the development of cardiovascular disease later in life.

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says “Bad” air may impact “Good” Cholesterol increasing Heart Disease Risk

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Traffic-related air pollution may increase cardiovascular disease risk by lowering levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), commonly known as “good” cholesterol, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Scientists have long known that air pollution increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and heart failure, but are uncertain how the two are connected.

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

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American Heart Association says Good Communication helps improve outcomes for Heart Patients

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Patients with hardened arteries who reported good communication with their healthcare providers were less likely to use the emergency room and more likely to comply with their treatment plans, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2017. 

Patients who said they communicated effectively with their healthcare providers were more likely to report the use of prescribed statin drugs and aspirin. (American Heart Association)

Patients who said they communicated effectively with their healthcare providers were more likely to report the use of prescribed statin drugs and aspirin. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart risks in Middle Age Boost Dementia Risk later in Life

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – People who have heart disease risks in middle age – such as diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking – are at higher risk for dementia later in life, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“The health of your vascular system in midlife is really important to the health of your brain when you are older,” said Rebecca F. Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

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