Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Blood Pressure

American Heart Association says Blood pressure control less likely among those treated in low-income areas

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX –  People enrolled in a large clinical hypertension management trial were half as likely to control their blood pressure if they received care at clinics and primary care practices in low-income areas, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Study participants at low-income sites were more likely to die before the end of the research study or die from complications of heart failure. (American Heart Association)

Study participants at low-income sites were more likely to die before the end of the research study or die from complications of heart failure. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says NASA Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they Exercise in Space

 

Findings May Help Others with Fainting Issues

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly 50 years after man’s first steps on the moon, researchers have discovered a way that may help NASA astronauts spending prolonged time in space come back to Earth on more stable footing, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“One of the biggest problems since the inception of the manned space program has been that astronauts have fainted when they came down to Earth ,” said Benjamin Levine, M.D., the study’s senior author who is professor of Exercise Sciences at UT Southwestern Medical Center and director of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.

Former Canadian Astronaut Robert “Bob” Thirsk wearing device which continuously measures blood pressure. (NASA)

Former Canadian Astronaut Robert “Bob” Thirsk wearing device which continuously measures blood pressure. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Low Vitamin D at Birth raises risk of Higher Blood Pressure in Kids

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, vitamin D deficiency from birth to early childhood was associated with an increased risk of elevated blood pressure in later childhood and adolescence.

Researchers followed 775 children from birth to age 18 at the Boston Medical Center. Most lived in a low-income, urban area and 68% of the children were African American. Low vitamin D levels were defined as less than 11 ng/ml (nanograms per millimeter) in cord blood at birth and less than 25 ng/ml in a child’s blood during early childhood.

The study findings suggest that vitamin D screening and supplementation in pregnancy and early childhood could prevent or reduce the risk of elevated blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

The study findings suggest that vitamin D screening and supplementation in pregnancy and early childhood could prevent or reduce the risk of elevated blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association reports U.S. Soldiers have worse Heart Health than Civilians

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, active duty Army personnel have worse cardiovascular health compared to people of similar ages in the civilian population.

Researchers compared a group of more than 263,000 active duty Army soldiers, age 17-64, who had a health examination in 2012 with a similar group of U.S. civilians participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2011-2012.

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Energy Drinks may increase risk of Heart Function Abnormalities, Blood Pressure Changes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to a small study published in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, drinking 32 ounces of an energy drink in a short time span may increase blood pressure and the risk of electrical disturbances in the heart. This can affect heart rhythm.

Three to four hours after drinking 32 ounces of energy drinks, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a placebo drink. (American Heart Association)

Three to four hours after drinking 32 ounces of energy drinks, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a placebo drink. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says New Pediatric Blood Pressure guidelines identify more Kids at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension new guidelines that classified more children as having elevated blood pressure  are better at predicting which kids are likely to develop heart disease when they reach adulthood.

The guidelines were issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2017 and endorsed by the American Heart Association.

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says combining morning exercise with short walking breaks helps control blood pressure in older overweight/obese adults

 

American Heart Association Hypertension Journal Report 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Thirty minutes of morning exercise lowers blood pressure for the rest of the day among older men and women who are overweight or obese. And women who take brief, frequent breaks from sitting throughout the day can enhance the blood pressure benefits of morning exercise even more, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Women who are overweight or obese enhanced the beneficial effects of morning exercise to reduce blood pressure by adding three-minute breaks from sitting every half hour throughout the day. (American Heart Association)

Women who are overweight or obese enhanced the beneficial effects of morning exercise to reduce blood pressure by adding three-minute breaks from sitting every half hour throughout the day. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Smoke-free policies associated with Lower Blood Pressure

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoke-free policies have been associated with lower systolic (top number) blood pressure readings among non-smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While smoke-free policies – laws that prohibit smoking in public places like bars and restaurants – have been associated with reduced rates of hospitalization for heart disease, previous studies have not examined changes in blood pressure.

Non-smokers who had access to smoke-free restaurants, bars and workplaces had lower systolic blood pressure readings than those who lived in areas without smoke-free laws. (American Heart Association)

Non-smokers who had access to smoke-free restaurants, bars and workplaces had lower systolic blood pressure readings than those who lived in areas without smoke-free laws. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says new physical activity findings on physical activity alarming

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on the World Health Organization (WHO)’s findings of insufficient physical activity in the world’s adult population.

According to the study, 40 percent of adults in the United States do not get the recommended amount of physical activity.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Stroke survivors could gain the most from new Blood Pressure Guidelines

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Treating high blood pressure in stroke survivors more aggressively, could cut deaths by one-third, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“The potential to reduce mortality and recurrent stroke is immense, because more than half of all strokes are attributable to uncontrolled high blood pressure,” said Alain Lekoubou, M.D., M.S., study lead author and clinical instructor in neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives