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NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope discovers Water Vapor for first time on Habitable-Zone Exoplanet

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Its size and surface gravity are much larger than Earth’s, and its radiation environment may be hostile, but a distant planet called K2-18b has captured the interest of scientists all over the world.

For the first time, researchers have detected water vapor signatures in the atmosphere of a planet beyond our solar system that resides in the “habitable zone,” the region around a star in which liquid water could potentially pool on the surface of a rocky planet.

This artist’s impression shows the planet K2-18b, its host star and an accompanying planet in this system. K2-18b is now the only super-Earth exoplanet known to host both water and temperatures that could support life. (ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser)

This artist’s impression shows the planet K2-18b, its host star and an accompanying planet in this system. K2-18b is now the only super-Earth exoplanet known to host both water and temperatures that could support life. (ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser)

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NASA Satellite Data reveals Climate Change effect on Fires

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Hot and dry. NASA says these are the watchwords for large fires. While every fire needs a spark to ignite and fuel to burn, it’s the hot and dry conditions in the atmosphere that determine the likelihood of a fire starting, its intensity and the speed at which it spreads. Over the past several decades, as the world has increasingly warmed, so has its potential to burn.

Since 1880, the world has warmed by 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit, with the five warmest years on record occurring in the last five years. Since the 1980s, the wildfire season has lengthened across a quarter of the world’s vegetated surface, and in some places like California, fire has become nearly a year-round risk.

Fires are a natural part of the ecosystem in North American forests. However, their size and intensity is shaped by climate. (NASA)

Fires are a natural part of the ecosystem in North American forests. However, their size and intensity is shaped by climate. (NASA)

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NASA looks into amount of Atmosphere lost by Mars

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – According to new observations by NASA-funded scientists, a key tracer used to estimate how much atmosphere Mars lost can change depending on the time of day and the surface temperature on the Red Planet.

Previous measurements of this tracer – isotopes of oxygen – have disagreed significantly. An accurate measurement of this tracer is important to estimate how much atmosphere Mars once had before it was lost, which reveals whether Mars could have been habitable and what the conditions might have been like.

This artist’s concept depicts the early Martian environment (right) – believed to contain liquid water and a thicker atmosphere – versus the cold, dry environment seen at Mars today (left). (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center)

This artist’s concept depicts the early Martian environment (right) – believed to contain liquid water and a thicker atmosphere – versus the cold, dry environment seen at Mars today (left). (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center)

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NASA Examines Hurricane Dorian’s Rainfall, Temperatures Along Carolina Coast

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – As Hurricane Dorian continued to lash the coast of the Carolinas NASA’s IMERG assessed the rainfall the storm generated and NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures of the cloud tops to assess strength.

By Friday morning, September 6th, Hurricane Dorian was located off the coast of North Carolina, having generated tornadoes the previous day as the northern rainband came ashore in North Carolina. NASA’s satellite-based real time precipitation estimates suggest that, during the past day, most of the areas experiencing over 10 inches of rain accumulation remained offshore, while Dorian did drop heavy rain on South Carolina and North Carolina.

NASA’s IMERG showed during the past day, most of the areas experiencing over 10 inches of rain accumulation remained offshore, while Dorian did drop heavy rain on South Carolina and North Carolina. The graphic shows the distance that tropical-storm force (39 mph) winds extend from Hurricane Dorian’s low-pressure center, as estimated by the National Hurricane Center. (Visualization by NASA Goddard.)

NASA’s IMERG showed during the past day, most of the areas experiencing over 10 inches of rain accumulation remained offshore, while Dorian did drop heavy rain on South Carolina and North Carolina. The graphic shows the distance that tropical-storm force (39 mph) winds extend from Hurricane Dorian’s low-pressure center, as estimated by the National Hurricane Center. (Visualization by NASA Goddard.)

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NASA Estimates Hurricane Dorian’s Massive Bahama Rainfall Totals

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Hurricane Dorian dropped excessive rainfall on the Bahamas and NASA calculated the rainfall the storm generated.

“By Wednesday morning, September 4th, 2019 the rain accumulation from Hurricane Dorian exceeded 36 inches in an area that included parts of Grand Bahama Island and Abaco Island,” said Owen Kelley, researcher at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

“By that time, the Dorian’s center was north of the Bahamas and was moving further north, approximately parallel to Florida’s east coast,” Kelley stated.

This image shows NASA IMERG estimated rainfall accumulations for the region of the Bahamas affected by Hurricane Dorian from August 31st to September 4th. The imagery shows rainfall exceeded 36 inches in an area that included parts of Grand Bahama Island and Abaco Island. (NASA Goddard)

This image shows NASA IMERG estimated rainfall accumulations for the region of the Bahamas affected by Hurricane Dorian from August 31st to September 4th. The imagery shows rainfall exceeded 36 inches in an area that included parts of Grand Bahama Island and Abaco Island. (NASA Goddard)

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NASA’s IMERG Estimates Hurricane Dorian’s Rain

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – In the early hours of Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019, NASA reports Hurricane Dorian had been stationary over the island of Grand Bahama for 18 hours, most of the time as a category 5 hurricane. Storm-total rain accumulation over parts of Grand Bahama and Abaco Islands have exceeded 24 inches according to NASA satellite-based estimates.

On early Tuesday morning, Dorian’s central pressure had risen and its wind intensity had dropped to category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. 

NASA’s IMERG storm-total rain accumulation over parts of Grand Bahama and Abaco islands have exceeded 24 inches according to NASA satellite-based estimates. The graphic also shows the distance that tropical-storm force (39 mph) winds extend from Hurricane Dorian’s low-pressure center, as reported by the National Hurricane Center. The symbols H and TS represent a hurricane of various Saffir-Simpson categories or a tropical storm, respectively. (NASA Goddard)

NASA’s IMERG storm-total rain accumulation over parts of Grand Bahama and Abaco islands have exceeded 24 inches according to NASA satellite-based estimates. The graphic also shows the distance that tropical-storm force (39 mph) winds extend from Hurricane Dorian’s low-pressure center, as reported by the National Hurricane Center. The symbols H and TS represent a hurricane of various Saffir-Simpson categories or a tropical storm, respectively. (NASA Goddard)

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NASA Overhead as Dangerous Hurricane Dorian Takes Aim at Grand Bahamas

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA says dangerous Hurricane Dorian has weakened slightly and is now a Category 4 storm as it continues to spin over the Bahamas.  Dorian has slowed to a crawl in terms of speed of movement only moving at west-northwest at about 1 mph (2 km/h). 

This means that the Bahamas will continue to get lashed by this monstrous storm and the amount of rainfall totals for the area continue to grow. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) has reported that the eye of the hurricane has begun to wobble a bit over Grand Bahama Island. 

Astronaut Christine Koch of the International Space Station captured this image of Hurricane Dorian outside the ISS windows the morning of September 2nd, 2019. (NASA)

Astronaut Christine Koch of the International Space Station captured this image of Hurricane Dorian outside the ISS windows the morning of September 2nd, 2019. (NASA)

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NASA releases update on Hurricane Dorian

 

Devastating Category 5 Hurricane Dorian Makes a Direct Hit on Abacos Islands

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA reports that the eye of Category 5 Hurricane Dorian was directly over the Abacos Islands as of the National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) 3:00pm CDT advisory and is now heading towards Grand Bahama Island.

The hurricane is located about 185 miles (295 km) east of West Palm Beach, FL. Maximum sustained winds are 185 mph (295 km/h) with gusts over 200 mph.

Dorian is moving west at 7 mph. The central pressure is 911 Mb which continues to lower meaning the storm continues to intensify. This is the fifth Category 5 hurricane sustained in the last five years.

Suomi NPP image of Hurricane Dorian showing its well-defined eye as it passed over Dorian at 2:20am CDT (0720 UTC). (NASA/NOAA/UWM-SSEC-CIMSS/William Straka III)

Suomi NPP image of Hurricane Dorian showing its well-defined eye as it passed over Dorian at 2:20am CDT (0720 UTC). (NASA/NOAA/UWM-SSEC-CIMSS/William Straka III)

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NASA reports Landsat Illustrates Five Decades of Change to Greenland Glaciers

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA says ice fronts have retreated, rocky peaks are more exposed, fewer icebergs drift to the ocean: the branching network of glaciers that empty into Greenland’s Sermilik Fjord has changed significantly in the last half century. Comparing Landsat images from 1972 and 2019, those changes and more come into view.

The glaciers appear brownish grey in this true-color Landsat 8 satellite image from August 12th, 2019. The color indicates that the surface has melted, a process that concentrates dust and rock particles and leads to a darker recrystallized ice sheet surface.

Glaciers in southeastern Greenland including, from left, Helheim, Fenris and Midgard are seen in a Landsat 8 image from August 12th, 2019. (NASA/Christopher Shuman)

Glaciers in southeastern Greenland including, from left, Helheim, Fenris and Midgard are seen in a Landsat 8 image from August 12th, 2019. (NASA/Christopher Shuman)

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NASA Ocean Ecosystem, Atmosphere Mission passes Major Review

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA’s newest mission to study the health of Earth’s ocean ecosystems and atmosphere is ready to move from design to reality after passing a key review hurdle.

The Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will study phytoplankton — microscopic plants and algae that live in the ocean — as well as the clouds and atmospheric aerosol particles above the water. Every mission goes through a rigorous review process on its journey from idea to launch, and PACE is now cleared to move forward to the critical design phase of the mission.

The Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will study phytoplankton — microscopic plants and algae that live in the ocean — as well as the clouds and atmospheric aerosol particles above the water. (NASA / Walt Feimer)

The Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will study phytoplankton — microscopic plants and algae that live in the ocean — as well as the clouds and atmospheric aerosol particles above the water. (NASA / Walt Feimer)

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