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Topic: Sugar

American Heart Association says Leading Health Organizations Support First-Ever Recommendations to Young Children’s Consumption of Healthy Drinks

 

American Heart AssociationPrinceton, NJ – The American Heart Association reports leading medical and nutrition organizations recommend breast milk, infant formula, water, and plain milk as part of a new set of comprehensive beverage recommendations for children, outlined by age (birth through age 5).

Healthy Drinks. Healthy Kids recommendations. (HealthyDrinksHealthyKids.org) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Sugar Added Labels on packaged foods, beverages could lower Heart Disease/Diabetes risk, Cut Healthcare Costs

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation shows a label showing added sugars content on all packaged foods and sugary drinks could have substantial health and cost-saving benefits in the United States over the next 20 years .

Using a validated model, researchers were able to estimate a significant reduction in cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes cases from 2018 to 2037, if such a mandated addition to the Nutrition Label was implemented.

Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Sugary drinks may be associated with an increased risk of Death from Cardiovascular Diseases

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation, frequently drinking sugar-sweetened drinks, such as sodas and sports drinks, was associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular diseases and, to a lesser extent, cancers

Among study participants the risk of death rose as people drank more sugar-sweetened drinks.

There was an association among people who drank the most sugary drinks and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other causes of death. (American Heart Association)

There was an association among people who drank the most sugary drinks and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other causes of death. (American Heart Association)

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NASA research shows Sugar Molecule may exist in Interstellar Space

 

NASA’s Ames Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMountain View, CA – When we think of sugar, it’s in the form of a holiday sweet or a reason to head back to gym after New Year’s Eve — we don’t usually think of the complex varieties that form the structural backbones of our very genetic code. And we certainly don’t think of sugar floating around in the vast darkness of space.

New research suggests that the sugar molecule that puts the “D” in DNA — 2-deoxyribose — could exist in the far reaches of space. A team of NASA astrophysicists were able to create DNA’s sugar in laboratory conditions that mimic interstellar space.

This enormous mosaic of the Milky Way galaxy from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, shows areas of interstellar space where dozens of dense clouds, called nebulas, are forming into new stars. (NASA)

This enormous mosaic of the Milky Way galaxy from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, shows areas of interstellar space where dozens of dense clouds, called nebulas, are forming into new stars. (NASA)

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United States Army to issue PT bracelet with 24/7 fitness tracking, remote mentoring

 

U.S. Army Public Affairs

U.S. ArmyWashington, D.C. – U.S. Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field a personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers’ fitness in real time.

The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers’ activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. It also allows leaders to provide remote mentoring in real time, according to Dr. Duke McDirkington, the lead scientific advisor from the U.S. Army’s Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, or USARIEM, and the co-chair of the Army’s Physical Training Belt Task Force.

Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field this personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers' fitness in real time. The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers' activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. (U.S. Army)

Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field this personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers’ fitness in real time. The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers’ activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. (U.S. Army)

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Meal planning, timing, may impact heart health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Planning when to eat meals and snacks and not skipping breakfast, are patterns associated with healthier diets, which could reduce cardiovascular disease risk, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The statement provides a snapshot of the current scientific evidence suggesting when and how often people eat may impact risk factors for heart attack, stroke, or other cardiac or blood vessel diseases.

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sugary Drink Sales drop nearly 20 percent after multi-faceted Campaign

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – After a multi-faceted campaign that included policy changes and community education efforts, residents of one Maryland county put fewer sugary drinks in their grocery carts, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Drinks loaded with added sugars are one of the leading sources of empty calories in the diet of both children and adults, and overconsumption of sugar is associated with obesity and an increased risk of heart disease.

This is the first study to measure the effect of a community led anti-sugary drink campaign using objective retail sales measures. (American Heart Association)

This is the first study to measure the effect of a community led anti-sugary drink campaign using objective retail sales measures. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Inherited Taste Perceptions may explain why some people eat too much Salt

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Inherited differences in taste perceptions may help explain why some people eat more salt than recommended, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

“Genetic factors that influence taste aren’t necessarily obvious to people, but they can impact heart health by influencing the foods they select,” said lead author Jennifer Smith, B.S.N., R.N., a Ph.D. student at the University of Kentucky College of Nursing.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease a Silent, Slow-Acting Killer

 

Lifestyle Changes Could Prevent Disease from Occurring, Save Lives

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Healthcare professionals are seeing evidence of a troubling new epidemic: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a potentially fatal condition that can follow a lifestyle of too little physical activity and a high-calorie diet with too much sugar.

The disease develops gradually as extra fat accumulates in the liver, usually has no early warning signs and causes irreversible harm to one of the body’s most important organs.

Health Alert «Read the rest of this article»

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Children should eat less than 25 grams of added Sugars daily according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children ages 2 to 18 should eat or drink less than six teaspoons of added sugars daily, according to the scientific statement recommending a specific limit on added sugars for children, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Six teaspoons of added sugars is equivalent to about 100 calories or 25 grams.

“Our target recommendation is the same for all children between the ages of 2 and 18 to keep it simple for parents and public health advocates,” said Miriam Vos, M.D., Ms.P.H, lead author, nutrition scientist and associate professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

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