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Topic: African American

Austin Peay State University professor Minoa Uffelman connects Students with Scholars using Skype

 

Austin Peay State University - APSU - logoClarksville, TN – When Austin Peay State University history major Rick Casteel raises his hand in his “The South To 1861” course, he knows that it’s important that he say the right thing.

But that’s not because Casteel is worried about answering incorrectly, or impressing his teacher, APSU associate professor of history, Dr. Minoa Uffelman.

APSU professor Minoa Uffelman

APSU professor Minoa Uffelman

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American Heart Association says African-Americans with Depression more likely to have Strokes, Heart Attack

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African Americans with major depressive symptoms – perceived stress, neuroticism, life dissatisfaction – had almost twice the increased risk of stroke and coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

While depression is recognized as a consequence of stroke and coronary heart disease, a common term for the buildup of plaque in the heart’s arteries that could lead to heart attack, most studies have been conducted in white populations. «Read the rest of this article»

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“Free at Last” traveling exhibition on Emancipation and Reconstruction on display at Fort Defiance Civil War Park

 

Clarksville Parks and Recreation DepartmentClarksville, TN – For the last year of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area has expanded its traveling exhibition about emancipation and Reconstruction. “Free at Last!” tells the momentous story of the transition from slavery to freedom and the development of citizenship among formerly enslaved African Americans.

Doubled in size to eight banner stands, the exhibition now has panels focused on each of Tennessee’s three grand divisions. “Free at Last!” is available to museums and historic sites free of charge and is on view at the Fort Defiance Civil War Park and Interpretive Center in Clarksville from now to December 10th, 2015.

Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area's "Free at Last" traveling exhibition «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Department of Health says Newborn Screening is best way to detect Sickle Cell Disease and Other Diseases in Tennessee

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health is urging everyone be aware of Sickle Cell disease and take action to identify it early. Sickle Cell Disease is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders that affects nearly 100,000 Americans.

Sickle Cell Disease is common in African Americans, Hispanic Americans and people of Middle Eastern, Asian, Indian and Mediterranean descent.

Newborn Screening saves lives.

Newborn Screening saves lives.

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American Heart Association reports Blacks are at greater risk for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Blacks are more likely than whites to experience sudden cardiac arrest and at a much earlier age, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers also found that blacks had higher rates than whites of well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including diabetes (52 percent vs. 33 percent), high blood pressure (77 percent vs. 65 percent), and chronic kidney failure (34 percent vs. 19 percent).

Cardiac Arrest vs. Heart Attack

Cardiac Arrest vs. Heart Attack

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American Heart Association says African-Americans at lower Socioeconomic Levels have increased risk of Heart Disease, Stroke

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African Americans at lower socioeconomic levels, particularly women and younger adults, are at greater risk of heart disease and stroke than those in higher socioeconomic positions, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the No. 1 killer of all Americans, but the burden is greater for African Americans.

African Americans, especially women and young adults at lower socioeconomic levels have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke. (American Heart Association)

African Americans, especially women and young adults at lower socioeconomic levels have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke. (American Heart Association)

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Clarksville’s Customs House Museum to host Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area’s “Free at Last!” exhibit

 

Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area Expands Traveling Exhibition on Emancipation and Reconstruction in Tennessee

Clarksville's Customs House Museum and Cultural CenterClarksville, TN – As we begin the last year of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area has expanded its traveling exhibition about emancipation and Reconstruction.

“Free at Last!” tells the momentous story of the transition from slavery to freedom and the development of citizenship among formerly enslaved African Americans.

Overview and West TN Panels

Overview and West TN Panels

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American Heart Association says Black men raised by single parent had higher blood pressure as adults

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African-American men raised in single-parent households in Washington, D.C., had higher blood pressure as adults than men raised by two parents, according to a study in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.

The study is the first to link childhood family living arrangements to adult blood pressure in African- American men, who have higher rates of high blood pressure than men in other ethnic groups. «Read the rest of this article»

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Austin Peay State University 2013 Asanbe Diversity Symposium to examine Tuskegee airmen

 

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – In the early 1940s, young African-American men from across the country made their way to the town of Tuskegee in southern Alabama. It was a small, rural community with a large Army airfield set up on the outskirts of town.

That’s where the Tuskegee Advanced Flying School was located.

Tuskegee airmen

Tuskegee airmen

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American Heart Association says Vitamin D supplements may help Blacks lower Blood Pressure

 

Additional studies in larger groups of African-Americans are necessary to confirm the findings.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Vitamin D supplements significantly reduced blood pressure in the first large controlled study of African-Americans, researchers report in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.

In the prospective trial, a three-month regimen of daily vitamin D increased circulating blood levels of vitamin D and resulted in a decrease in systolic blood pressure ranging from .7 to four mmHg (depending upon the dose given), compared with no change in participants who received a placebo. «Read the rest of this article»

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