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Topic: Boeing

NASA’s Langley Research Center receives visit from Vice President, Administrator for Artemis Program Update

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Vice President Mike Pence, chair of the National Space Council, and NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine got a glimpse Wednesday into how NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia is at the forefront of space exploration and has been vital to missions from Apollo to Artemis.

“It’s an honor to be among men and women who will play a decisive role when in four years’ time we return American astronauts to the Moon and make sure the first women and the next man on the moon will be Americans,” Pence told employees during his remarks.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks to employees during his visit to NASA's Langley Research Center Wednesday. (NASA/David C. Bowman)

Vice President Mike Pence speaks to employees during his visit to NASA’s Langley Research Center Wednesday. (NASA/David C. Bowman)

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NASA has big plans for 2020

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In 2020, NASA will be taking long strides toward returning astronauts to the Moon, continuing the exploration of Mars and developing new technology to make supersonic aircraft fly more quietly.

Artemis: Returning astronauts to the Moon

Under Artemis, NASA will send new science instruments and technology demonstrations to study the Moon, accelerate plans to send astronauts to the Moon by 2024, and establish sustainable lunar exploration by 2028.

Launching Americans from U.S. soil, sending a new rover to Mars and continuing to prepare for human missions to the Moon are just a few of the things NASA has planned for 2020. (NASA TV/Lacey Young)

Launching Americans from U.S. soil, sending a new rover to Mars and continuing to prepare for human missions to the Moon are just a few of the things NASA has planned for 2020. (NASA TV/Lacey Young)

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NASA reports Successful Landing of Boeing’s Starliner Flight Test

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft completed the first land touchdown of a human-rated capsule in U.S. history Sunday at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, wrapping up the company’s uncrewed Orbital Flight Test as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.

Starliner settled gently onto its airbags at 6:58am CST (5:58am MST) in a pre-dawn landing that helps set the stage for future crewed landings at the same site. The landing followed a deorbit burn at 6:23am, separation of the spacecraft’s service module, and successful deployment of its three main parachutes and six airbags.

The Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft is seen after it landed in White Sands, New Mexico, Sunday, December 22nd, 2019. The landing completes an abbreviated Orbital Flight Test for the company that still meets several mission objectives for NASA’s Commercial Crew program. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

The Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft is seen after it landed in White Sands, New Mexico, Sunday, December 22nd, 2019. The landing completes an abbreviated Orbital Flight Test for the company that still meets several mission objectives for NASA’s Commercial Crew program. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

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NASA says Boeing Flight Test for Commercial Crew Program Will Pave the Way for Future Science

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – NASA says Boeing’s uncrewed Orbital Flight Test (OFT) will be the second uncrewed test flight of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, a partnership with the aerospace industry to launch astronauts on U.S. rockets and spacecraft from U.S. soil for the first time since 2011.

When Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft lifts off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket December 20th from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida, scientists who research how things behave in space will be amongst the eager spectators watching with bated breath.

The crew module of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft is lifted onto its service module on Oct. 16 inside the Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility (C3PF) at Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of the company’s Orbital Flight Test to the International Space Station as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. (Boeing)

The crew module of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft is lifted onto its service module on Oct. 16 inside the Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility (C3PF) at Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of the company’s Orbital Flight Test to the International Space Station as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. (Boeing)

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NASA, Boeing Orbital Flight Test a Major Step Forward

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationCape Canaveral, FL – NASA says when Boeing’s Orbital Flight Test (OFT) launches on December 20th, 2019, it will be a major step toward returning human spaceflight capability to the U.S. 

The uncrewed mission for NASA’s Commercial Crew Program will rendezvous and dock Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft with the International Space Station and return to Earth on December 28th. Starliner will launch atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 (SLC-41) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, topped by the Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, stands on Space Launch Complex 41 at Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Dec. 4, 2019. Boeing’s Orbital Flight Test will launch on Dec. 20th, 2019. (Boeing)

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, topped by the Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, stands on Space Launch Complex 41 at Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Dec. 4, 2019. Boeing’s Orbital Flight Test will launch on Dec. 20th, 2019. (Boeing)

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NASA to test World’s Largest Rocket Fuel Tank

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – Engineers are preparing to push a test article identical to the world’s largest rocket fuel tank beyond its design limits and find its breaking point during upcoming tests at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Earlier this year, a NASA and Boeing test team subjected a test version of the Space Launch System (SLS) liquid hydrogen tank to a series of 37 tests that simulate liftoff and flight stresses by using large hydraulic pistons to push and pull on the test tank with millions of pounds of force.  

Engineers are preparing to push a test article identical to the world’s largest rocket fuel tank beyond its design limits and find its breaking point during upcoming tests at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This will be the largest-ever controlled test-to-failure of a NASA rocket stage fuel tank. (NASA/MSFC)

Engineers are preparing to push a test article identical to the world’s largest rocket fuel tank beyond its design limits and find its breaking point during upcoming tests at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This will be the largest-ever controlled test-to-failure of a NASA rocket stage fuel tank. (NASA/MSFC)

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NASA reports All Four Engines Are Attached to the SLS Core Stage for Artemis I Mission

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – All four RS-25 engines were structurally mated to the core stage for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket for Artemis I, the first mission of SLS and NASA’s Orion spacecraft. To complete assembly of the rocket stage, engineers and technicians are now integrating the propulsion and electrical systems within the structure.

The completed core stage with all four RS-25 engines attached is the largest rocket stage NASA has built since the Saturn V stages for the Apollo Program that first sent Americans to the Moon.

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket now has all four RS-25 engines were mated to the core stage. (Eric Bordelon, NASA)

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket now has all four RS-25 engines were mated to the core stage. (Eric Bordelon, NASA)

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NASA manufactures first Large Complex Stage to power missions to the Moon

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA achieved a significant milestone in manufacturing the first large, complex core stage that will help power the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket on upcoming missions to the Moon.

NASA and lead contractor Boeing have assembled four-fifths of the massive core stage needed to launch SLS and the Orion spacecraft on their first mission to the Moon: Artemis 1.

The Artemis program will send the first woman and the next man to the Moon by 2024 and develop a sustainable human presence on the Moon by 2028.

The forward part and liquid hydrogen tank for the core stage were connected to form most of the massive core stage that will propel the SLS rocket on the first Artemis 1 mission to the Moon. (NASA/Eric Bordelon)

The forward part and liquid hydrogen tank for the core stage were connected to form most of the massive core stage that will propel the SLS rocket on the first Artemis 1 mission to the Moon. (NASA/Eric Bordelon)

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NASA’s race back to the Moon helped along by Michigan

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – Michigan is helping NASA work towards sending the first woman and next man to the Moon by 2024.   

Futuramic, a company with factories in Detroit and Warren, is one of more than 78 Michigan companies and 3,200 businesses across 50 states supporting NASA’s return to the Moon by supplying parts for the agency’s new deep space rocket, Space Launch System (SLS), the Orion spacecraft and Exploration Ground Systems.

Through NASA’s Artemis program, the agency will embark on a series of increasingly complex missions to establish a presence at the Moon for decades to come and learn the skills needed to send astronauts to Mars.

Technicians prepare the passive roller tool built by Futuramic in Warren, Michigan, to transport the massive liquid hydrogen fuel tank for NASA’s new deep space rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), so that it can be joined to the top part of the core stage. The tool is enabling the construction of the rocket’s core stage that will be provide 2 million pounds of thrust to launch the Artemis-1 mission beyond the Moon. (NASA/Eric Bordelon)

Technicians prepare the passive roller tool built by Futuramic in Warren, Michigan, to transport the massive liquid hydrogen fuel tank for NASA’s new deep space rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), so that it can be joined to the top part of the core stage. The tool is enabling the construction of the rocket’s core stage that will be provide 2 million pounds of thrust to launch the Artemis-1 mission beyond the Moon. (NASA/Eric Bordelon)

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NASA looks to Advance Human Moon Landers with help from 11 American Companies

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA looks to put American astronauts, the first woman and next man, on the Moon’s south pole by 2024 and establish sustainable missions by 2028. In order to do so, NASA has picked 11 companies to conduct studies and produce prototypes of human landers for its Artemis lunar exploration program.

“To accelerate our return to the Moon, we are challenging our traditional ways of doing business. We will streamline everything from procurement to partnerships to hardware development and even operations,” said Marshall Smith, director for human lunar exploration programs at NASA Headquarters.

Illustration of a human landing system. (NASA)

Illustration of a human landing system. (NASA)

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