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Topic: Columbia University Medical Center

American Heart Association says Hip Hop music teaches Children, Parents to recognize Stroke and act quickly

 

Stroke Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – An intervention that uses hip hop music with stroke education lyrics increased stroke awareness for economically-disadvantaged, minority children and their parents, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“The lack of stroke recognition, especially among blacks, results in dangerous delays in treatment,” said Olajide Williams, M.D., M.S., study author and associate professor of neurology at Columbia University Medical Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital. “Because of those delays, only a quarter of all stroke patients arrive at the hospital within the ideal time for clot-busting treatment.”  

The “Hip Hop Stroke” initiative uses hip hop music lyrics to effectively educate economically-disadvantaged, minority children and parents about stroke. (American Heart Association)

The “Hip Hop Stroke” initiative uses hip hop music lyrics to effectively educate economically-disadvantaged, minority children and parents about stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Taking Meds after Heart Procedures may boost trouble-free Survival Rate

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Medications matter, but if you are a heart patient who doesn’t take them as prescribed you may have a lower trouble-free survival rate and heart bypass surgery may be more beneficial than percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI or stenting), according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Coronary artery bypass surgery redirects blood flow to the heart around clogged heart arteries.

Heart bypass patients appeared to be more resistant than PCI patients to the negative effects of not taking prescribed medication. (American Heart Association)

Heart bypass patients appeared to be more resistant than PCI patients to the negative effects of not taking prescribed medication. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association report shows Wealthiest not Sickest Patients may have edge in Organ Transplants

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report: Abstract 15991

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Registering with more than one organ transplant center appears to give an edge to wealthy patients over those with the most medical need, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers studied the national database of organ donors from 2000 to 2013 and found that patients who simultaneously listed at more than one center had higher transplant rates, lower death rates while waiting, were wealthier and were more likely to be insured.

Raymond Givens, M.D., Ph.D. - Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Fellow, Columbia University Medical Center, New York. (American Heart Association)

Raymond Givens, M.D., Ph.D. – Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Fellow, Columbia University Medical Center, New York. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says ‘Perfect storm’ of Stress, Depression may raise risk of Death, Heart Attack for Heart Patients

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The combination of stress and heavy depression can significantly increase heart patient’s risk of death or heart attack, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study examined the effect of high stress levels and high depressive symptoms among nearly 5,000 heart patients.

Researchers say behavioral interventions may be needed to help heart patients manage both stress and depression. (American Heart Association)

Researchers say behavioral interventions may be needed to help heart patients manage both stress and depression. (American Heart Association)

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