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Topic: exercise

American Heart Association says NFL PLAY 60’s exercise library keeps kids active during COVID-19 pandemic

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – The American Heart Association, the world’s leading nonprofit organization focused on heart and brain health for all, and the National Football League (NFL), in collaboration with the Tennessee Titans, have debuted the first-ever NFL PLAY 60 library, which features kid-friendly exercises to help kids to get their recommended 60-minutes of daily physical activity.

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Beware of summer heat – how to stay safe, cool during Summer despite the COVID-19 Threat

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association says with so many people now exercising outdoors instead of indoor gyms and studios, it is important to be aware of the dangers of heat illnesses brought on by exertion and the steps you can take to safely exercise in the heat.

American Heart Association gives tips to say safe in the Summer Heat

American Heart Association gives tips to say safe in the Summer Heat

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FDA approves new treatment for a type of Heart Failure

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Silver Spring, MD – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Farxiga (dapagliflozin) oral tablets for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

Heart failure occurs when the heart does not pump enough blood to support the body’s needs, and this type of heart failure happens when the heart’s main pumping chamber, the left ventricle, is weakened.

FDA approves drug for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

FDA approves drug for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

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NASA explains how the International Space Station is Helping Us Get to the Moon

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – The International Space Station is a stepping stone for NASA’s Artemis program that will land the first woman and next man on the Moon by 2024.

As the only place for conducting long-duration research on how living in microgravity affects living organisms, especially humans, as well as testing technologies to allow humans to work at the Moon, the space station serves as a unique asset in the effort establish a sustainable presence at the Moon.

The moon as seen from the International Space Station. (NASA)

The moon as seen from the International Space Station. (NASA)

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Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Soldiers support 531st deployment, some appointments may be impacted

 

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH)Fort Campbell, KY – Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH) personnel are working to minimize impact to beneficiaries as a number of Soldiers serving at the hospital prepare to deploy with the 531st Hospital Center.

More than two dozen military medical personnel assigned to Blanchfield Army Community Hospital are supporting the 531st Hospital Center emergency deployment readiness exercise, which was announced this past weekend.

This deployment exercise, which includes military medical personnel, may temporarily impact some BACH primary and specialty care services within the next month.

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital

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American Heart Association says High Blood Pressure affects Young, Healthy Medical Students

 

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Almost two-thirds of medical students had above-normal blood pressure and were more than twice as likely to experience clinically high blood pressure compared to the general public, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.  

High blood pressure is typically linked with older age, being overweight, smoking and/or being in general poor health.

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Aerobic Exercise Programs may improve Endurance, Walking after Stroke

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, indicates stroke survivors who completed group-based aerobic exercise programs similar in design and duration to cardiac rehabilitation programs significantly improved their aerobic endurance and walking ability.

Stroke remains the leading cause of disability in the U.S. and physical therapy is often prescribed to improve physical impairments after stroke.

Mixed forms of aerobic activity and walking had the most benefit for stroke survivors. (American Heart Association)

Mixed forms of aerobic activity and walking had the most benefit for stroke survivors. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Multivitamins do not promote Cardiovascular Health

 

American Heart Association Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Taking multivitamin and mineral supplements does not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death, according to a new analysis of 18 studies published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

“We meticulously evaluated the body of scientific evidence,” said study lead author Joonseok Kim, M.D., assistant professor of cardiology in the Department of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “We found no clinical benefit of multivitamin and mineral use to prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death.”

Multivitamins and mineral supplements do not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death. (American Heart Association)

Multivitamins and mineral supplements do not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death. (American Heart Association)

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Fort Campbell Army Wellness Center helps Army spouse reach her fitness goals

 

Written by Maria Yager
Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Public Affairs

Blanchfield Army Hospital - BACH - Fort Campbell KYFort Campbell, KY – Army spouse Leah Hernandez seemed to be at an impasse. She attended a gym, exercised regularly, watched what she ate, drank plenty of water, but for some reason she could not seem to lose any weight. Frustrated, she turned to the staff at the Fort Campbell Army Wellness Center to see what more she could do.

“The Army Wellness Center offers standardized primary prevention programs for our Soldiers and retirees, their family members and Department of the Army civilians. We are trying to help our population lead healthy lifestyles by teaching people how to make healthy lifestyle changes and healthy habits when it comes to stress, physical fitness and nutrition,” said Jheri Weidensall, Army Wellness Center program lead.

Jheri Weidensall, Fort Campbell Army Wellness Center program specialist talks to participants at a Fueling for Health Class about the variety and quantity of foods they should eat for optimal nutrition and wellness. The class is one of many wellness events offered free at the Army Wellness Center to Soldiers, retirees, family members and Department of the Army Civilians. (U.S. Army photo by Maria Yager)

Jheri Weidensall, Fort Campbell Army Wellness Center program specialist talks to participants at a Fueling for Health Class about the variety and quantity of foods they should eat for optimal nutrition and wellness. The class is one of many wellness events offered free at the Army Wellness Center to Soldiers, retirees, family members and Department of the Army Civilians. (U.S. Army photo by Maria Yager)

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American Heart Association says when Heart Disease runs in the Family, Exercise may be Best Defense

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXExercise may be the best way to keep hearts healthy – and it works even for people with a genetic pre-disposition for heart disease, according to new findings in the American Heart Association’s journal, Circulation.

Data assessed from roughly a half-million people in the UK Biobank database showed that greater grip strength, more physical activity and better cardiorespiratory fitness are all associated with reduced risk for heart attacks and stroke, even among people with a genetic predisposition for heart disease.

As fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk. (American Heart Association)

As fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk. (American Heart Association)

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