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Topic: Jet Stream

How APSU Detected the First Chinese Atomic Bomb

 

APSU alumnus Dr. Ronald Miller (’65) wrote this personal account of a historic moment in APSU history.

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – As a senior physics major in the Fall of 1964, I was asked by the Physics Faculty to take part in a research program they were conducting. The program was fairly simple, as research goes, but was important at the time.

Harold Dewein and Ronald Miller test air samplings. (The All State)

Harold Dewein and Ronald Miller test air samplings. (The All State)

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NASA reports Ozone Hole Smallest on Record Since Its Discovery

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA and NOAA scientists reported today that abnormal weather patterns in the upper atmosphere over Antarctica dramatically limited ozone depletion in September and October, resulting in the smallest ozone hole observed since 1982.

The annual ozone hole reached its peak extent of 6.3 million square miles (16. 4 million square kilometers) on September 8th, and then shrank to less than 3.9 million square miles (10 million square kilometers) for the remainder of September and October, according to NASA and NOAA satellite measurements. During years with normal weather conditions, the ozone hole typically grows to a maximum area of about 8 million square miles in late September or early October.

The 2019 ozone hole reached its peak extent of 6.3 million square miles (16. 4 million square kilometers) on September 8th. Abnormal weather patterns in the upper atmosphere over Antarctica dramatically limited ozone depletion this year. (NASA)

The 2019 ozone hole reached its peak extent of 6.3 million square miles (16. 4 million square kilometers) on September 8th. Abnormal weather patterns in the upper atmosphere over Antarctica dramatically limited ozone depletion this year. (NASA)

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NASA reports a strong, growing El Niño head to United States

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The current strong El Niño brewing in the Pacific Ocean shows no signs of waning, as seen in the latest satellite image from the U.S./European Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM)/Jason-2 mission.

El Niño 2015 has already created weather chaos around the world. Over the next few months, forecasters expect the United States to feel its impacts as well.

The latest Jason-2 image bears a striking resemblance to one from December 1997, by Jason-2’s predecessor, the NASA/Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) Topex/Poseidon mission, during the last large El Niño event. Both reflect the classic pattern of a fully developed El Niño. The images can be viewed at:
http://sealevel.jpl.nasa.gov/elnino2015/index.html

The latest satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In Dec. 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. This year the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The latest satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In Dec. 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. This year the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA tracks dust plume from Chelyabinsk Meteor explosion through the Stratosphere

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Atmospheric physicist Nick Gorkavyi missed witnessing an event of the century last winter when a meteor exploded over his hometown of Chelyabinsk, Russia.

From Greenbelt, MD, however, NASA’s Gorkavyi and colleagues witnessed the atmospheric aftermath. The explosion created a never-before-seen belt of “meteor dust” that circulated through the stratosphere for at least three months.

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NASA Confirms Launch Date for Five Rocket Mission to Study the Jet Stream

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWallops Island, VA – NASA managers have given a “go” for a countdown leading to the launch of five suborbital sounding rockets early in the morning March 27th on a science mission that will briefly create a milky white cloud that may be visible along a large portion of the U.S. east coast.

The launch window for the mission will be between 2:00am and 5:00am, Tuesday, March 27th. The countdown will begin at 9:00pm, Monday, March 26th. Clear skies are predicted for the Tuesday launch.  However, ground level winds may exceed allowable limits for the flights to occur.

The red dots over the water show where ATREX will deploy chemical tracers to watch how super fast winds move some 60 miles up in the atmosphere. While there are only five rockets, two will deploy two sets of tracers, resulting in seven clouds. Only six dots appear in this image, since two will be deployed at the left-most red/green dot, which represents Wallops. Three cameras will track the cloud tracers – one at Wallops and two located at the green dots. (Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center)

The red dots over the water show where ATREX will deploy chemical tracers to watch how super fast winds move some 60 miles up in the atmosphere. While there are only five rockets, two will deploy two sets of tracers, resulting in seven clouds. Only six dots appear in this image, since two will be deployed at the left-most red/green dot, which represents Wallops. Three cameras will track the cloud tracers – one at Wallops and two located at the green dots. (Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center)

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NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft Spies Wave Rattling Jet Stream on Jupiter

 

Written by Jia-Rui Cook
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – New movies of Jupiter are the first to catch an invisible wave shaking up one of the giant planet’s jet streams, an interaction that also takes place in Earth’s atmosphere and influences the weather.

The movies, made from images taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft when it flew by Jupiter in 2000, are part of an in-depth study conducted by a team of scientists and amateur astronomers led by Amy Simon-Miller at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, and published in the April 2012 issue of Icarus.

Following the path of one of Jupiter's jet streams, a line of V-shaped chevrons travels west to east just above Jupiter's Great Red Spot. (Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute)

Following the path of one of Jupiter's jet streams, a line of V-shaped chevrons travels west to east just above Jupiter's Great Red Spot. (Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute)

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What Happened to all the Snow?

 

Written by Dauna Coulter
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Winter seems to be on hold this year in some parts of the United States. Snowfall has been scarce so far in places that were overwhelmed with the white stuff by the same time last year.

Here’s a prime example. “The Mammoth Mountain ski resort in the Sierras of California got more than 200 inches of snow last December,” says NASA climatologist Bill Patzert of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “This December they got less than 10 inches.”

Temperatures have flip-flopped too. There were 583 new heat records broken in the first five days of January in the US.

(left) Effects of the positive phase of the arctic oscillation; (right) effects of the negative phase of the arctic oscillation (Figures courtesy of J. Wallace, University of Washington)

(left) Effects of the positive phase of the arctic oscillation; (right) effects of the negative phase of the arctic oscillation (Figures courtesy of J. Wallace, University of Washington)

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