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Topic: Landslide

TDOT releases new Update on I-24 Eastbound Landslide in Davidson County

 

Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT)

Tennessee Department of Transportation - TDOTNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) says slope stabilization and repair work is still underway on the area of I-24 eastbound in northwest Davidson County that is currently closed following a landslide the night of February 23rd, 2019.

The contractor is on schedule to open the roadway on Friday, March 15th.

TDOT estimates the permanent fix will cost $8 million

TDOT estimates the permanent fix will cost $8 million

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TDOT releases Update on I-24 Eastbound Landslide in Davidson County

 

Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT)

Tennessee Department of Transportation - TDOTNashville, TN – After three days of clearing and surveying a still-active landslide on I-24 East in northwest Davidson County, the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) anticipates being able to safely reopen both travel lanes on Friday, March 15th, 2019.

Over the next two weeks, a TDOT contractor will be working on an accelerated schedule to remove the unstable material that is threatening to fall onto the interstate.

Tennessee Department of Transportation anticipates opening I-24 EB on March 15th.

Tennessee Department of Transportation anticipates opening I-24 EB on March 15th.

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NASA studies elements that make a Stable Landslide into a disastrous one

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – “Stable landslide” sounds like a contradiction in terms, but there are indeed places on Earth where land has been creeping downhill slowly, stably and harmlessly for as long as a century. But stability doesn’t necessarily last forever.

For the first time, researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and collaborating institutions have documented the transition of a stable, slow-moving landslide into catastrophic collapse, showing how drought and extreme rains likely destabilized the slide.

The Mud Creek landslide in photographic image. The radar velocity map shows the pre-collapse (solid line) and post-collapse (dashed line) extent of the sliding area, with faster sliding velocities before the collapse shown in darker shades of red. The highest velocities were about 16 inches (40 centimeters) per year. (Google/SIO/NOAA/U.S. Navy/NGA/GEBCO/Landsat/Copernicus)

The Mud Creek landslide in photographic image. The radar velocity map shows the pre-collapse (solid line) and post-collapse (dashed line) extent of the sliding area, with faster sliding velocities before the collapse shown in darker shades of red. The highest velocities were about 16 inches (40 centimeters) per year. (Google/SIO/NOAA/U.S. Navy/NGA/GEBCO/Landsat/Copernicus)

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NASA has new Model for finding Landslide Threats in Near Real-Time

 

Written by Kasha Patel
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – For the first time, scientists can look at landslide threats anywhere around the world in near real-time, thanks to satellite data and a new model developed by NASA.

The model, developed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, estimates potential landslide activity triggered by rainfall. Rainfall is the most widespread trigger of landslides around the world. If conditions beneath Earth’s surface are already unstable, heavy rains act as the last straw that causes mud, rocks or debris — or all combined — to move rapidly down mountains and hillsides.

This graphic shows the potential landslide activity in December averaged over the last 15 years as evaluated by NASA's Landslide Hazard Assessment model for Situational Awareness model. Here, you can see landslide trends across the world. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center / Scientific Visualization Studio)

This graphic shows the potential landslide activity in December averaged over the last 15 years as evaluated by NASA’s Landslide Hazard Assessment model for Situational Awareness model. Here, you can see landslide trends across the world. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Scientific Visualization Studio)

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