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Topic: NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland Mission

NASA reports Landsat Illustrates Five Decades of Change to Greenland Glaciers

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA says ice fronts have retreated, rocky peaks are more exposed, fewer icebergs drift to the ocean: the branching network of glaciers that empty into Greenland’s Sermilik Fjord has changed significantly in the last half century. Comparing Landsat images from 1972 and 2019, those changes and more come into view.

The glaciers appear brownish grey in this true-color Landsat 8 satellite image from August 12th, 2019. The color indicates that the surface has melted, a process that concentrates dust and rock particles and leads to a darker recrystallized ice sheet surface.

Glaciers in southeastern Greenland including, from left, Helheim, Fenris and Midgard are seen in a Landsat 8 image from August 12th, 2019. (NASA/Christopher Shuman)

Glaciers in southeastern Greenland including, from left, Helheim, Fenris and Midgard are seen in a Landsat 8 image from August 12th, 2019. (NASA/Christopher Shuman)

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NASA data reveals Greenland’s Jakobshavn Glacier has Grown for Third Straight Year

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA says that Greenland’s fastest-moving and fastest-thinning glacier for most of the 2000s, the Jakobshavn Glacier, grew from 2018 into 2019, marking three consecutive years of growth according to recent data.

These images, produced using GLISTIN-A radar data as part of NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) mission, show how much mass the glacier gained from 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19.

These images show the mass Greenland's Jakobshavn Glacier has gained from 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19. Areas with the most growth - about 33 yards (30 meters) - are shown in dark blue. Red areas represent thinning. The images were produced using GLISTIN-A radar data as part of NASA's Ocean's Melting Greenland (OMG) mission. (NASA/JPL-Caltech / NASA Earth Observatory)

These images show the mass Greenland’s Jakobshavn Glacier has gained from 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19. Areas with the most growth – about 33 yards (30 meters) – are shown in dark blue. Red areas represent thinning. The images were produced using GLISTIN-A radar data as part of NASA’s Ocean’s Melting Greenland (OMG) mission. (NASA/JPL-Caltech / NASA Earth Observatory)

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NASA says Greenland’s fastest moving, fastest thinning Glacier is slowing, thickening

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA research shows that Jakobshavn Glacier, which has been Greenland’s fastest-flowing and fastest-thinning glacier for the last 20 years, has made an unexpected about-face.

Jakobshavn is now flowing more slowly, thickening, and advancing toward the ocean instead of retreating farther inland. The glacier is still adding to global sea level rise – it continues to lose more ice to the ocean than it gains from snow accumulation – but at a slower rate.

The calving front of Jakobshavn Glacier, center. (NASA/OIB/John Sonntag)

The calving front of Jakobshavn Glacier, center. (NASA/OIB/John Sonntag)

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NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland mission still making discoveries

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Only seven months after NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) mission wrapped its last field campaign on the world’s largest island, an OMG crew is back in Greenland to collect more data.

With two or three field projects a year since 2016, no wonder OMG has made the most comprehensive measurements yet of how ocean water lapping at the undersides of Greenland’s melting glaciers affects them. All that data has answered a lot of existing questions – and it’s raised plenty of new ones.

Cracks in the front of a glacier as it reaches the ocean. (NASA/Adam Klein)

Cracks in the front of a glacier as it reaches the ocean. (NASA/Adam Klein)

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NASA studies role ocean water has on Greenland’s Melting Glaciers

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – “Three, two, one … drop!” Researchers in NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland campaign heard that phrase 239 times this fall. Each time, it triggered a team member to release a scientific probe from an airplane into the seawater along the coast of Greenland. The probes are part of a five-year effort to improve our understanding of the ocean’s role in Greenland’s rapid ice loss.

Since 2016, OMG has been collecting measurements around the huge island on three separate trips a year. Each spring, a research aircraft measures the height of the ice sheet after the winter snows.

Oceans Melting Greenland Principal Investigator Josh Willis drops a probe during OMG's fall 2018 airborne campaign, then he and flight engineer Glenn Warren watch its descent from the plane windows. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Oceans Melting Greenland Principal Investigator Josh Willis drops a probe during OMG’s fall 2018 airborne campaign, then he and flight engineer Glenn Warren watch its descent from the plane windows. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA team begins third year examining Greenland’s melting Glaciers

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – With a new research plane and a new base to improve its chances of outsmarting Atlantic hurricanes, NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland campaign takes to the sky this week for its third year of gathering data on how the ocean around Greenland is melting its glaciers.

OMG’s first two years of operations already collected the most comprehensive data available on the subject, but OMG Principal Investigator Josh Willis of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is hungry for more.

A close encounter with Greenland ice during a 2017 Oceans Melting Greenland field campaign. (NASA)

A close encounter with Greenland ice during a 2017 Oceans Melting Greenland field campaign. (NASA)

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NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland mission survey produces new data, maps of Greenland’s Glaciers

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) mission has released preliminary data on the heights of Greenland coastal glaciers from its first airborne campaign in March 2016.

The new data show the dramatic increase in coverage that the mission provides to scientists and other interested users. Finalized data on glacier surface heights, accurate within three feet (one meter) or less vertically, will be available by February 1st, 2017.

The Oceans Melting Greenland campaign has released new, more accurate maps of Greenland's coastal glaciers. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The Oceans Melting Greenland campaign has released new, more accurate maps of Greenland’s coastal glaciers. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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