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Topic: NASA’s Orion spacecraft

NASA’s Orion Crew Survival System spacesuit Equipped for the Unexpected on Artemis Missions

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – When NASA astronauts are hours away from launching on Artemis missions to the Moon, they’ll put on a brightly colored orange spacesuit called the Orion Crew Survival System (OCSS) suit. It is designed for a custom fit and equipped with safety technology and mobility features to help protect astronauts on launch day, in emergency situations, high-risk parts of missions near the Moon, and during the high-speed return to Earth.

Many missions require two spacesuits – one worn outside a spacecraft during spacewalks that is designed as a self-contained personal spaceship, and another worn inside a spacecraft during high-risk parts of a mission, such as inside Orion during launch and reentry through Earth’s atmosphere.

NASA is building the Orion Crew Survival System spacesuit to protect astronauts during launch, reentry and emergency situations during Artemis missions. (NASA)

NASA is building the Orion Crew Survival System spacesuit to protect astronauts during launch, reentry and emergency situations during Artemis missions. (NASA)

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NASA lists Top Five Technologies Needed for a Spacecraft to Survive Deep Space

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says when a spacecraft built for humans ventures into deep space, it requires an array of features to keep it and a crew inside safe. Both distance and duration demand that spacecraft must have systems that can reliably operate far from home, be capable of keeping astronauts alive in case of emergencies and still be light enough that a rocket can launch it.

Artemis Missions near the Moon will start when NASA’s Orion spacecraft leaves Earth atop the world’s most powerful rocket, NASA’s Space Launch System.

Artist rendering of NASA’s Orion spacecraft as it travels 40,000 miles past the Moon during Artemis I, its first integrated flight with the Space Launch System rocket. (NASA)

Artist rendering of NASA’s Orion spacecraft as it travels 40,000 miles past the Moon during Artemis I, its first integrated flight with the Space Launch System rocket. (NASA)

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NASA assembles final section of Space Launch System Rocket Stage

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA finished assembling and joining the main structural components for the largest rocket stage the agency has built since the Saturn V that sent Apollo astronauts to the Moon.

Engineers at the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans connected the last of the five sections of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage on September 19th. The stage will produce 2 million pounds of thrust to send Artemis I, the first flight of SLS and NASA’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon.

NASA finished assembling the main structural components for the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage on Sept. 19. Engineers at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans fully integrated the last piece of the 212-foot-tall core stage by adding the engine section to the rest of the previously assembled structure. (NASA/Steven Seipel)

NASA finished assembling the main structural components for the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage on Sept. 19. Engineers at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans fully integrated the last piece of the 212-foot-tall core stage by adding the engine section to the rest of the previously assembled structure. (NASA/Steven Seipel)

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NASA Artemis Missions gets Boost to the Moon from Kentucky Companies

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – When NASA astronauts set foot on the Moon’s surface in 2024, men and women across Kentucky can say they helped to make it possible.

NASA recognized three Kentucky businesses — Parker Hannifin Corp., American Synthetic Rubber Co., a Michelin company; and Eckart America Corp. — in Lexington and Louisville September 18th-19th for their continued support in supplying critical elements and tools for the twin solid rocket boosters of NASA’s powerful Space Launch System (SLS) rocket.

Retired NASA astronaut Col. William “Bill” McArthur, along with NASA and Northrop Grumman personnel, view a test splice of the material used for an elastomer sealing at Parker Hannifin Corp., in Lexington, Kentucky, Sept. 18. Parker Hannifin’s O-ring and Engineered Seals Division provides elastomer sealing that is a key component for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket boosters. (NASA)

Retired NASA astronaut Col. William “Bill” McArthur, along with NASA and Northrop Grumman personnel, view a test splice of the material used for an elastomer sealing at Parker Hannifin Corp., in Lexington, Kentucky, Sept. 18. Parker Hannifin’s O-ring and Engineered Seals Division provides elastomer sealing that is a key component for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket boosters. (NASA)

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NASA Orion Spacecraft to undergo extreme Space Conditions tests

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationCleveland, OH – NASA’ Orion spacecraft for Artemis I will head to Ohio for the final stretch of major testing before integration with the Space Launch System rocket for launch.

Slated to begin this fall, a team of engineers and technicians stand ready to test the spacecraft, consisting of the crew and service modules, under simulated extreme in-space conditions in the world’s premier space environments test facility at NASA’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio.

The Heat Flux System stands ready in the Space Environments Complex thermal vacuum chamber ahead of Artemis I testing at NASA’s Plum Brook Station. (NASA)

The Heat Flux System stands ready in the Space Environments Complex thermal vacuum chamber ahead of Artemis I testing at NASA’s Plum Brook Station. (NASA)

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NASA’s Artemis Lunar Exploration Program

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA is committed to landing American astronauts, including the first woman and the next man, on the Moon by 2024. Through the agency’s Artemis lunar exploration program, we will use innovative new technologies and systems to explore more of the Moon than ever before.

NASA will collaborate with their commercial and international partners to establish sustainable missions by 2028. And then we will use what we learn on and around the Moon to take the next giant leap – sending astronauts to Mars.

Artist's concept of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule prepared for launch. (NASA)

Artist’s concept of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule prepared for launch. (NASA)

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NASA’s Artemis Program Human Lunar Lander Development to be lead by Marshall Space Flight Center

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine was joined Friday by U.S. Representatives Mo Brooks and Robert Aderholt of Alabama and Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, to announce the center’s new role leading the agency’s Human Landing System Program for its return to the Moon by 2024.

“Marshall Space Flight Center is the birthplace of America’s space program. It was Marshall scientists and engineers who designed, built, tested, and helped launch the giant Saturn V rocket that carried astronauts on the Apollo missions to the Moon,” Brooks said.

On Aug. 16, 2019, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, will lead the Human Landing System Program. Bridenstine was joined by Representatives Mo Brooks and Robert Aderholt of Alabama and Representative Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee. (NASA Television)

On Aug. 16, 2019, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, will lead the Human Landing System Program. Bridenstine was joined by Representatives Mo Brooks and Robert Aderholt of Alabama and Representative Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee. (NASA Television)

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NASA’s Orion’s Service Module passes Propulsion Test

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In order to send astronauts to the Moon for Artemis missions, NASA is working on building a new system that includes tests to make sure the Orion spacecraft is prepared to safely carry crew on an alternate mission profile in the face of unexpected problems.

That capability was most recently demonstrated with a successful, continuous 12-minute firing of Orion’s propulsion system that simulated a possible alternate mission scenario.

NASA tests the Orion propulsion system. (NASA)

NASA tests the Orion propulsion system. (NASA)

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NASA’s Artemis lunar exploration program

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA is committed to landing American astronauts, including the first woman and the next man, on the Moon by 2024.

Through the agency’s Artemis lunar exploration program, we will use innovative new technologies and systems to explore more of the Moon than ever before.

NASA will collaborate with their commercial and international partners to establish sustainable missions by 2028. And then we will use what we learn on and around the Moon to take the next giant leap – sending astronauts to Mars.

Artist's concept of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule prepared for launch. (NASA)

Artist’s concept of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule prepared for launch. (NASA)

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NASA to make Green Run test of it’s Space Launch System

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – On Thursday, July 25th, 2018, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced that the agency will conduct an “Green Run” core stage test for the Space Launch System rocket ahead of the upcoming Artemis 1 lunar mission.

The first eight minutes of every Artemis mission with NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket will begin with core stage and solid rocket boosters producing 8.8 million pounds of thrust to launch the agency’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon.

The “Green Run” test of the core stage for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) will be conducted at the B-2 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Flight Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The historic test stand has been used to test stages for multiple programs, including the Saturn V and the space shuttle. The test stand was renovated to accommodate the SLS rocket’s core stage, which is the largest stage NASA has ever built. (NASA)

The “Green Run” test of the core stage for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) will be conducted at the B-2 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Flight Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The historic test stand has been used to test stages for multiple programs, including the Saturn V and the space shuttle. The test stand was renovated to accommodate the SLS rocket’s core stage, which is the largest stage NASA has ever built. (NASA)

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