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Topic: Smoke

NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument observes California Wildfires’ Carbon Monoxide output

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard the Aqua satellite, captured carbon monoxide plumes coming from California wildfires last week. There were 28 major wildfires burning across the state as of September 14th, 2020. This includes the August Complex Fire, which started on August 17th and has since burned over 471,000 acres, making it the largest fire on record in California.

The animation shows three-day averages of carbon monoxide concentrations around 3 miles (5 kilometers) up in the atmosphere between September 6th and September 14th.

This visualization shows a three-day average of carbon monoxide concentrations from Sept. 6 to 14

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office reports Smoke Inhalation More Dangerous than Burns in House Fires

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – The importance of smoke alarms has never been greater in the survivability of a house fire. Most fire fatalities are caused by smoke inhalation, not by burns.

As the toxicity and speed of smoke increases, the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) is sharing tips on how you can keep your family safe from the toxic smoke and fumes produced by a home fire.

When a fire grows inside a building, it will deplete most of the available oxygen which slows the burning process.

Toxic Smoke Can Quickly Overcome Residents, Inhibiting Their Escape from a House Fire according to the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office.

Toxic Smoke Can Quickly Overcome Residents, Inhibiting Their Escape from a House Fire according to the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office.

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal states Most Home Fire Deaths Caused by Smoke, Not Flames

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Home is the place people feel safest from fire, but it’s actually the place they’re at greatest risk. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), approximately 80 percent of all U.S. fire deaths occur in the home. Most home fire fatalities, however, are not caused by burns, but by smoke inhalation.

To help prevent these tragedies, the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) is reminding residents that the early detection capabilities of a working smoke alarm can mean the difference between life and death.

Most home fire fatalities are caused by smoke inhalation. A working smoke alarm can be a live safer.

Most home fire fatalities are caused by smoke inhalation. A working smoke alarm can be a live safer.

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Tennessee Fire Marshal’s Office says Don’t Forget Smoke Alarm Batteries When You ‘Fall Back’ This Weekend

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Get an extra hour of sleep this weekend when you “fall back” for daylight saving time, but keep your peace of mind all year long by changing the batteries in your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Tennesseans should turn their clocks backward one hour at 2:00am on Sunday, November 5th, 2017.

“Even alarms that are hard-wired should have their batteries replaced regularly and should be tested monthly to ensure they are providing the proper protection,” State Fire Marshal and Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance (TDCI) Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak said. “Daylight saving time is the perfect time to ensure your home’s smoke alarms are working. Use the extra hour we gain this weekend to make sure your home and family are fire-safe.”

Daylight Saving Time comes to an end «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Fire Marshal says As Summer Temps Rise, Chances for Fire Increases

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – With summer in full swing, the State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) offers important fire safety tips to help Tennesseans protect themselves, their loved ones, and their property during the hottest months of the year.

“While the summertime ushers in lots of opportunities for fun, the season also brings increased safety risks due to the elevated temperatures,” said State Fire Marshal and Commerce & Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak. “We urge Tennesseans to follow recommended fire safety measures, stay hydrated, and check on elderly neighbors during the hot summer days ahead.”

Summer house fires can be prevented.

Summer house fires can be prevented.

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NASA research shows Smoke from Wildfires can Impact Climate more than previously thought

 

Written by Joe Atkinson
NASA Langley Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHampton, VA – The 2017 wildfire season is well underway in the United States with thousands of acres scorched already in Georgia and Florida alone, according to the National Park Service. New research using data collected during NASA airborne science campaigns shows how smoke from this type of wildfire worldwide could impact the atmosphere and climate much more than previously thought.

The study, led by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, found brown carbon particles released into the air from burning trees and other organic matter are much more likely than previously thought to travel to the upper levels of the atmosphere, where they can interfere with rays from the sun – sometimes cooling the air and at other times warming it.

Brown carbon particles produced by wildfires such as the ones that have scorched parts of Georgia and Florida this year are more likely than previously thought to travel to the upper levels of the atmosphere and impact climate. (NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team, GSFC)

Brown carbon particles produced by wildfires such as the ones that have scorched parts of Georgia and Florida this year are more likely than previously thought to travel to the upper levels of the atmosphere and impact climate. (NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team, GSFC)

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Tennessee Agencies Provide Guidance as Devastating Wildfires Impact East Tennessee

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation are urging residents of East Tennessee areas affected by devastating wildfires to protect themselves and their families from smoke.

While inhaling smoke may adversely affect anyone, those at greatest risk include the elderly, young children, pregnant women and those with existing respiratory conditions, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, or those with heart disease.

Smoke from devastating wildfires in East Tennessee areas can be damaging to your health.

Smoke from devastating wildfires in East Tennessee areas can be damaging to your health.

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American Heart Association reports Female Smokers face greatest risk for Brain Bleeds

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Bleeding inside the lining of the brain (subarachnoid hemorrhage) is significantly more common among smokers, especially female smokers, than among people who do not smoke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage results from bleeding into the lining between the brain’s surface and underlying brain tissue.

Even light smoking increases the risk, but the greatest risk is among heavy smokers.

Even light smoking increases the risk, but the greatest risk is among heavy smokers.

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NASA reports a strong, growing El Niño head to United States

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The current strong El Niño brewing in the Pacific Ocean shows no signs of waning, as seen in the latest satellite image from the U.S./European Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM)/Jason-2 mission.

El Niño 2015 has already created weather chaos around the world. Over the next few months, forecasters expect the United States to feel its impacts as well.

The latest Jason-2 image bears a striking resemblance to one from December 1997, by Jason-2’s predecessor, the NASA/Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) Topex/Poseidon mission, during the last large El Niño event. Both reflect the classic pattern of a fully developed El Niño. The images can be viewed at:
http://sealevel.jpl.nasa.gov/elnino2015/index.html

The latest satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In Dec. 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. This year the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The latest satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In Dec. 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. This year the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office says Don’t Forget Smoke Alarm Batteries When You ‘Fall Back’ This Weekend

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Get an extra hour of sleep this weekend when you “fall back” for daylight savings time, but keep your peace of mind all year long by changing the batteries in your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Tennesseans should turn their clocks backward one hour on Sunday, November 1st, 2015 at 2:00am.

“Even alarms that are hard-wired should have their batteries replaced regularly and should be tested monthly to ensure they are providing the proper protection,” State Fire Marshal and Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance (TDCI) Julie Mix McPeak said. “Use the extra hour we gain this weekend to make sure your home and family are fire-safe.”

Change your Clocks and Smoke Alarm Batteries «Read the rest of this article»

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