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Topic: Stress

Tennessee Emotional Support Line adds Text Message Capability

 

Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse ServicesNashville, TN – Tennessee’s Emotional Support Line for Pandemic Stress is adding a new method for people to reach out for help.  The free and confidential line now has the capability to offer assistance via text message. 

Woman in Stress

Woman in Stress

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Tennessee State Agency on Aging provides Advice for Caregivers and those living with Dementia during the holidays

 

Tennessee State GovernmentNashville, TN – This year’s holiday season this year may look a little different for all of us. For individuals living with dementia and their caregivers this season may potentially cause additional stress, confusion, or anxiety.

Holiday Considerations for Individuals with Dementia and Caregivers

Holiday Considerations for Individuals with Dementia and Caregivers

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Centerstone Offers COVID-19 Relief through Tennessee Recovery Project

 

Nashville, TN – Centerstone, a national leader in behavioral health care based in Nashville, is partnering with the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (TDMHSAS) to provide COVID-19 Coronavirus relief in 21 counties across the state.

Known as the Tennessee Recovery Project and funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the effort allows Centerstone to offer resource connection and short-term supportive counseling to those whose mental health has been impacted by the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus

Coronavirus

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New Phone Line to Support Tennessee Healthcare Workers on Front Lines of COVID-19 Pandemic Response

 

Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse ServicesNashville, TN – Tennessee’s healthcare workers and first responders who are on the front lines of the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic response have a new resource to reach out to about feelings of stress, anxiety, sadness, or depression related to work.  The COVID-19 Emotional Support Line for healthcare workers is available to call at 888.642.7886.

Tennessee-based emotional support line staffed by volunteer mental health professionals.

Tennessee-based emotional support line staffed by volunteer mental health professionals.

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U.S. Army aids New York City caregivers in battle against COVID-19 stress

 

U.S. ArmyNew York –  Maj. Olli Toukolehto recognized the wear on the faces of healthcare workers each time he walked into the Javits Convention Center from his hotel in lower Manhattan.

He had witnessed the same strain on the faces of fellow Soldiers while deployed during the Iraqi surge.

Caring for COVID-19 patients in the nation’s coronavirus epicenter has taken a mental and physical toll on New York City doctors, nurses and emergency medical technicians, as the number of coronavirus deaths in the city nears 14,000.

Maj. Olli Toukolehto, an Army psychiatrist, has been deployed to New York City for more than a month to support civilian medical professionals in the fight against COVID-19. He has been tasked to spearhead an outreach program to help educate civilian health workers on resilience and mental health during the pandemic.

Maj. Olli Toukolehto, an Army psychiatrist, has been deployed to New York City for more than a month to support civilian medical professionals in the fight against COVID-19. He has been tasked to spearhead an outreach program to help educate civilian health workers on resilience and mental health during the pandemic.

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American Heart Association says High Levels of Chronic Stress linked to High Blood Pressure in African Americans

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association, African Americans reporting high levels of chronic stress tended to develop high blood pressure, or hypertension, more often than those who reported low stress levels.

Woman Blood Pressure check with Nurse. (American Heart Association)

Woman Blood Pressure check with Nurse. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Mental Stress-Induced constricted blood vessels more likely in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

In most people, mental stress causes peripheral vessels to constrict. In people with heart disease, this effect can cause a reduction in blood supply to the heart muscle called “ischemia.”

Woman in Stress

Woman in Stress

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American Heart Association says Abuse and Adversity in Childhood linked to more Cardiovascular Risk in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children and teens who are abused, witness violence, are bullied or face other adversities are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, according to a new scientific statement by the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is based on a review of existing scientific research published in peer-reviewed medical journals that documents a strong association between adverse experiences in childhood and teen years and a greater likelihood of developing risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes earlier than those not experiencing adverse experiences.

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

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Sleep deprivation may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in older women

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Older women who don’t get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

In the new study, researchers considered sleeping at least two hours more during the weekend than on the weekday as a sign of being in sleep debt.

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Stressful Events can increase Women’s Odds of Obesity

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Women who experienced one or more traumatic lifetime events or several negative events in recent years had higher odds of being obese than women who didn’t report such stress, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Women who reported four or more negative events in the last five years, such as unemployed though wanting work, had increased odds of obesity.

Women who reported four or more negative events in the last five years, such as unemployed though wanting work, had increased odds of obesity.

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