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Topic: AIRS

NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument observes California Wildfires’ Carbon Monoxide output

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard the Aqua satellite, captured carbon monoxide plumes coming from California wildfires last week. There were 28 major wildfires burning across the state as of September 14th, 2020. This includes the August Complex Fire, which started on August 17th and has since burned over 471,000 acres, making it the largest fire on record in California.

The animation shows three-day averages of carbon monoxide concentrations around 3 miles (5 kilometers) up in the atmosphere between September 6th and September 14th.

This visualization shows a three-day average of carbon monoxide concentrations from Sept. 6 to 14

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NASA’s AIRS instrument observes Tropical Storm Fay as it hits East Coast

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Tropical Storm Fay is sweeping across New England, with the center of the storm making landfall about 10 miles (15 kilometers) north-northeast of Atlantic City, New Jersey, at around 5:00pm local time.

At that time, Fay had maximum sustained winds of around 50 mph (85 kph). Forecasters predicted the storm will dump up to 7 inches (18 centimeters) of rain along its path from Delaware into New Jersey.

NASA's AIRS instrument captured this image of Tropical Storm Fay around 2 p.m. local time on July 10, 2020, as the storm swept through New England. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

NASA’s AIRS instrument captured this image of Tropical Storm Fay around 2 p.m. local time on July 10, 2020, as the storm swept through New England. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA Study reveals Amazon Drying Out due to Human Activities

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new NASA study shows that over the last 20 years, the atmosphere above the Amazon rainforest has been drying out, increasing the demand for water and leaving ecosystems vulnerable to fires and drought. It also shows that this increase in dryness is primarily the result of human activities.

Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, analyzed decades of ground and satellite data over the Amazon rainforest to track both how much moisture was in the atmosphere and how much moisture was needed to maintain the rainforest system.

The Amazon rainforest. (Marcio Isensee e Sa, Adobe Stock)

The Amazon rainforest. (Marcio Isensee e Sa, Adobe Stock)

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NASA’s AIRS instrument Maps Carbon Monoxide from Amazon Fires

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument, aboard the Aqua satellite, has produced new data that shows the movement high in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide associated with fires in the Amazon region of Brazil.

This time series maps carbon monoxide at an altitude of 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) from August 8th-22nd, 2019. As the series progresses, the carbon monoxide plume grows in the northwest Amazon region then drifts in a more concentrated plume toward the southeastern part of the country.

This photo shows carbon monoxide associated with fires from the Amazon region in Brazil. Made with data collected from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite, the images map carbon monoxide at approximately 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) altitude. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This photo shows carbon monoxide associated with fires from the Amazon region in Brazil. Made with data collected from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite, the images map carbon monoxide at approximately 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) altitude. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Aqua spacecraft captures image of Severe Weather in Southern United States

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – An unusually quiet start to the spring 2014 tornado season in the United States ended abruptly Sunday, April 27th. That’s when severe weather moved through the central and southern states, and it is continuing through Tuesday, April 29th.

The National Weather Service (NWA) says, as of Tuesday morning, more than 110 tornados had been reported, resulting in numerous fatalities across several states.

An unusually quiet start to the spring 2014 tornado season in the United States ended abruptly April 27th, as a severe weather outbreak moved through the central and southern U.S. April 27th-29h. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

An unusually quiet start to the spring 2014 tornado season in the United States ended abruptly April 27th, as a severe weather outbreak moved through the central and southern U.S. April 27th-29h. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Aqua spacecraft provides scientists with relative humidity data that could help forecast Hurricane Strengths

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Forecasters could soon be better able to predict how intense tropical cyclones like Hurricane Sandy will be by analyzing relative-humidity levels within their large-scale environments, finds a new NASA-led study.

Scientists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, UCLA and the University of Hawaii at Manoa analyzed relative humidity data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua spacecraft for nearly 200 North Atlantic hurricanes between 2002 and 2010.

Hurricane Sandy as seen by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft on Oct. 28th, 2012, when the Category 1 storm was centered off the southeastern U.S. coast. A new NASA-led study finds that analysis of relative humidity levels in the large-scale environment of tropical cyclones may be useful in improving forecasts of their intensity. (Image credit: NASA GSFC/LANCE MODIS Rapid Response Team)

Hurricane Sandy as seen by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA’s Terra spacecraft on Oct. 28th, 2012, when the Category 1 storm was centered off the southeastern U.S. coast. A new NASA-led study finds that analysis of relative humidity levels in the large-scale environment of tropical cyclones may be useful in improving forecasts of their intensity. (Image credit: NASA GSFC/LANCE MODIS Rapid Response Team)

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