Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Body Mass Index

American Heart Association says Being Overweight may change Young Adults’ Heart Structure, Function

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Even as a young adult, being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for heart disease later in life, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

The study is the first to explore if higher body mass index (BMI) – a weight-for-height index – results in adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in young adults.

Being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and changes to the heart’s structure, even in young adults. (American Heart Association)

Being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and changes to the heart’s structure, even in young adults. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Bariatric Surgery for Severely Obese Teens may help prevent Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Bariatric surgery is predicted to cut in half the risk of premature heart disease and stroke in teens with severe obesity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The researchers used a model based on research from the Framingham Heart Study that predicts the likelihood of heart disease events over a 30-year period.

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Men develop Irregular Heartbeat earlier than Women

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Men develop a type of irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation, about a decade earlier than women on average, and being overweight is a major risk factor, according to a large new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, quiver instead of beat to move blood effectively.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


In spite of extraordinary progress, more needs to be done to save Women from Heart Disease, says American Heart Association CEO

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown and co-author of the study “Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding Cardiovascular Disease in Women” published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, issued the following comments:

“Cardiovascular diseases cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. That’s why the American Heart Association first brought this critical issue to light through the creation of the Go Red For Women™ movement in 2004.”

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Overweight and obese people are burdened by cardiovascular disease at younger ages

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – People who are overweight or obese may live as long as or less than those of healthy weight, but they experience cardiovascular disease at an earlier age and live longer burdened by the disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Eating in Social Settings may be greatest temptation for Dieters

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – For people trying to lose weight or maintain a lower body weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

The 12-month study of 150 people (90 percent women) used smartphones and a custom-developed application to capture data as dieters moved through everyday life.

For people trying to lose or maintain weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting.

For people trying to lose or maintain weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Seven Heart-Healthy Habits could save billions in Medicare costs

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More than $41 billion a year in Medicare costs could be saved if all beneficiaries achieved ideal levels for five to seven heart-healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular risk, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. 

At least $41 billion annually in Medicare costs could be saved if beneficiaries adopted five to seven of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular disease.

At least $41 billion annually in Medicare costs could be saved if beneficiaries adopted five to seven of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular disease.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Children Score Low on Cardiovascular Health Measures

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Proactive strategies for promoting good heart health should begin at birth, yet most American children do not meet the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal childhood cardiovascular health, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Instead of taking a wait-and-see approach by treating disease later in adulthood, we should help children maintain the standards of ideal cardiovascular health that most children are born with,” said Julia Steinberger, M.D., M.S., lead author of the new statement, professor in pediatrics and director of pediatric cardiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Post Coronary Artery Bypass Infections may be linked to severe Obesity

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCoronary artery bypass patients who have severe obesity are more likely to experience infection shortly after surgery and stay in the hospital longer, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Compared to coronary artery bypass patients with normal weight, patients with severe obesity were three times more likely to develop an infection after bypass surgery, researchers said.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls