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Topic: Cardiovascular

NASA reports SpaceX Cargo Spacecraft headed to International Space Station with latest Science Investigations

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – The latest SpaceX Dragon resupply spacecraft is on its way to the International Space Station with more than 6,400 pounds of science investigations, a new airlock, and other cargo after launching at 10:17am CT Sunday from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The spacecraft launched on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy and is scheduled to arrive at the space station around 12:30pm Monday, December 7th, performing the first autonomous docking for SpaceX and remaining at the station for about a month.

SpaceX launched its 21st commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station at 10:17am CT December 6th, 2020, from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (NASA Television)

SpaceX launched its 21st commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station at 10:17am CT December 6th, 2020, from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (NASA Television)

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FDA approves new treatment for a type of Heart Failure

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Silver Spring, MD – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Farxiga (dapagliflozin) oral tablets for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

Heart failure occurs when the heart does not pump enough blood to support the body’s needs, and this type of heart failure happens when the heart’s main pumping chamber, the left ventricle, is weakened.

FDA approves drug for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

FDA approves drug for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

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American Heart Association says combining morning exercise with short walking breaks helps control blood pressure in older overweight/obese adults

 

American Heart Association Hypertension Journal Report 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Thirty minutes of morning exercise lowers blood pressure for the rest of the day among older men and women who are overweight or obese. And women who take brief, frequent breaks from sitting throughout the day can enhance the blood pressure benefits of morning exercise even more, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Women who are overweight or obese enhanced the beneficial effects of morning exercise to reduce blood pressure by adding three-minute breaks from sitting every half hour throughout the day. (American Heart Association)

Women who are overweight or obese enhanced the beneficial effects of morning exercise to reduce blood pressure by adding three-minute breaks from sitting every half hour throughout the day. (American Heart Association)

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Clarksville Center For Audiology Hearing Specialist Highlights Link Between Hearing & the Heart

 

Clarksville Center For Audiology

Clarksville Center for AudiologyClarksville, TN – Dr. Emiko LeJeune, Dr. Aubrey Carr, and Dr. Katelyn Crockett of the Clarksville Center For Audiology, are using American Heart Month as an opportunity to get the word out that there is a connection between your heart health and your hearing health.

“The different systems in the body are connected in surprising ways,” says LeJeune, an audiologist in the Clarksville area for more than 30 years.

Dr. Aubrey Carr, Dr. Emiko LeJeune, and Dr. Katelyn Crockett of the Clarksville Center For Audiology

Dr. Aubrey Carr, Dr. Emiko LeJeune, and Dr. Katelyn Crockett of the Clarksville Center For Audiology

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American Heart Association says Being Overweight may change Young Adults’ Heart Structure, Function

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Even as a young adult, being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for heart disease later in life, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

The study is the first to explore if higher body mass index (BMI) – a weight-for-height index – results in adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in young adults.

Being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and changes to the heart’s structure, even in young adults. (American Heart Association)

Being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and changes to the heart’s structure, even in young adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Studying Heart Disease after Death can help the Living

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Autopsy is often an overlooked source of medical insight which may be hindering advances in cardiovascular medicine, according to new research published in a special issue of the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Autopsy is a source of discovery that informs the way we think about disease systemically,” said Jeffrey E. Saffitz, M.D., Ph.D., co-editor of the special issue and chair of the department of pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.”

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Genomic Medicine may one day revolutionize Cardiovascular Care

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association summarizes the state-of-the-science of genomic medicine — the study of the health effects of the molecular interactions of a person’s unique genes — for studying cardiovascular traits and disorders and for therapeutic screening.

Genomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people's health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment. (American Heart Association)

Genomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people’s health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says when Heart Disease runs in the Family, Exercise may be Best Defense

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXExercise may be the best way to keep hearts healthy – and it works even for people with a genetic pre-disposition for heart disease, according to new findings in the American Heart Association’s journal, Circulation.

Data assessed from roughly a half-million people in the UK Biobank database showed that greater grip strength, more physical activity and better cardiorespiratory fitness are all associated with reduced risk for heart attacks and stroke, even among people with a genetic predisposition for heart disease.

As fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk. (American Heart Association)

As fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Targeting Pathway may reduce Cocaine’s Cardiovascular Harms

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Scientists have discovered a potential new pathway to treat the harmful effect of cocaine on the cardiovascular system, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Researchers found that excess levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), molecules known to be found in the aortas of hypertensive animals and humans, are also involved in cocaine-related cardiovascular disease.

Cocaine in mice increased levels of reactive oxygen species, molecules known to cause cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

Cocaine in mice increased levels of reactive oxygen species, molecules known to cause cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Less than One in 100 Stroke Survivors meet Heart Health Goals

 

American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Fewer than one in 100 stroke survivors meet all of Life’s Simple 7 goals for ideal cardiovascular health identified by the American Heart Association.

Moreover, the proportion who fail to meet almost all of the criteria is on the rise, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Learn to Protect Your Heart and Your Brain with Life’s Simple 7 at www.heart.org/mylifecheck Unhealthy behaviors can lead to narrowing of the blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the brain and potentially leading to hardening of the arteries of the heart and the brain. My Life Check - Life's Simple 7. (American Heart Association)

Learn to Protect Your Heart and Your Brain with Life’s Simple 7 at www.heart.org/mylifecheck Unhealthy behaviors can lead to narrowing of the blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the brain and potentially leading to hardening of the arteries of the heart and the brain. My Life Check – Life’s Simple 7. (American Heart Association)

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