Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Children

Marsha Blackburn, Richard Blumenthal Call for Full Funding of Programs to Prevent Child Exploitation

 

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – Senators Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) wrote today to Senate appropriators to request increased funding for missing and exploited children programs in the appropriations bill currently before Congress.

The letter follows a recent report finding that over 45 million online images and videos were flagged as child sexual abuse last year, and that images are increasing exponentially in number, becoming more extreme, and featuring increasingly younger victims.

Senator Marsha Blackburn.

Senator Marsha Blackburn.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Politics | No Comments
 

Tennessee Tipping the Scales Against Childhood Obesity

 

Tennessee Department of Human ServicesNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Human Services (TDHS) is receiving recognition for new requirements designed to promote good health in state licensed child care agencies.

The National Resource Center (NRC) for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education cited those changes in a report https://nrckids.org/files/Final.ASHW.2018.Report_8.19.19.pdf ranking Tennessee’s regulations as the most supportive of obesity prevention in the country.  This is the first time Tennessee has topped the NRC’s annual report and it marks a substantial improvement from the state’s previous 39th ranking.

A new report ranks the state number one in the nation for child care licensing regulations that support healthy weight practices.

A new report ranks the state number one in the nation for child care licensing regulations that support healthy weight practices.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Tennessee Shows Reduction in the Number of Children Living in Concentrated Poverty

 

One of 29 States Nationwide to Show Progress in Child Poverty Rate According to New Data Snapshot from the Annie E. Casey Foundation

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – The percentage of Tennessee children living in areas of concentrated poverty fell 7% between 2013 and 2017, according to “Children Living in High Poverty, Low-Opportunity Neighborhoods,” a new KIDS COUNT® data snapshot released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Using the latest data available from the U.S. Census Bureau, the snapshot examines where concentrated poverty has worsened across the country despite a long period of national economic expansion.

Living in a neighborhood with a high level of concentrated poverty, in addition to putting children at risk from environmental exposure and reduced opportunities, can cause chronic stress and trauma.

In Tennessee 13% of kids are growing up in concentrated poverty. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says New Pediatric Blood Pressure guidelines identify more Kids at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension new guidelines that classified more children as having elevated blood pressure  are better at predicting which kids are likely to develop heart disease when they reach adulthood.

The guidelines were issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2017 and endorsed by the American Heart Association.

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Wearable Defibrillators may be an alternative to Surgically Implanted Device for children with certain heart rhythm disorders

 

American Heart Association Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Wearable cardioverter defibrillators – vest-like devices that deliver electric shocks to interrupt a dangerous heart rhythm – may be a safe and effective alternative to surgically implanted devices in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death, according to new research published in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, an American Heart Association journal.

Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted . (American Heart Association)

Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted . (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says In-Womb Air Pollution Exposure associated with Higher Blood Pressure in Childhood

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during the third trimester of their mother’s pregnancy had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) is a form of air pollution produced by motor vehicles and the burning of oil, coal and biomass, and has been shown to enter the circulatory system and negatively affect human health.

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Whitney Johns: Unmet Expectations, Unfulfilled Desires

 

SpiritualityMurfreesboro, TN – In the past year, I graduated from college with a four-year bachelor’s degree, moved to a new city, and began applying for jobs. I quickly realized that four years of college means nothing in most cases, seventeen is the preferred number of years of experience most employers want, and the only jobs I was qualified for were Lyft driving and folding clothes at Old Navy.

Yes, this sounds incredibly pessimistic. But let’s be honest here – anyone over the age of 22 has experienced this in some way. And if you haven’t experienced this in the business world, you still know the feeling. It is the heartache of unmet expectations, the sorrow of unfulfilled desires.

Whitney Johns

Whitney Johns

«Read the rest of this article»

 


American Heart Association says Abuse and Adversity in Childhood linked to more Cardiovascular Risk in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children and teens who are abused, witness violence, are bullied or face other adversities are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, according to a new scientific statement by the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is based on a review of existing scientific research published in peer-reviewed medical journals that documents a strong association between adverse experiences in childhood and teen years and a greater likelihood of developing risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes earlier than those not experiencing adverse experiences.

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Teens also at risk for Organ Damage from High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Organ damage from high blood pressure doesn’t only occur in adults; it can also happen in teenagers, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017 in San Francisco.

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Kids with heart defects face Learning Challenges, Inadequate School Support

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children with all types of congenital heart defects face learning challenges in elementary school, but many may not be receiving adequate education assistance, according to a new study in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Using North Carolina education records, birth defect registries and birth certificates, the new research examined whether congenital heart defects were associated with low scores on standard reading and math tests given at the end of third grade. The research included 2,807 children born with heart defects, and 6,355 without, who completed third grade in public school between 2006 to 2012.

Children with congenital heart defects are less likely to meet minimum standards in third-grade reading and math end-of-year testing than peers. (American Heart Association)

Children with congenital heart defects are less likely to meet minimum standards in third-grade reading and math end-of-year testing than peers. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives