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Topic: Defibrillator

American Heart Association says Driving a Tesla may not trip your Defibrillator

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Sitting in, or standing close to the charging port of a Tesla electric vehicle didn’t trigger a shock or interfere with implantable defibrillator performance, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Research team (L to R) Abdul Wase M.D. (Principal Investigator), Marina Brown R.N., Ken Shneider, Thein Aung M.D., Matt Clark, Dawn Hunt and Kimberle Evans R.N. Good Samaritan Hospital Dayton, Ohio. (Joe Carfora)

Research team (L to R) Abdul Wase M.D. (Principal Investigator), Marina Brown R.N., Ken Shneider, Thein Aung M.D., Matt Clark, Dawn Hunt and Kimberle Evans R.N. Good Samaritan Hospital Dayton, Ohio. (Joe Carfora)

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Driver comes to aid of stricken woman

 

Father says quick action saved his daughter’s life

City of Clarksville - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – Medical officials and family members are crediting the quick, decisive actions of trash hauler Ray Davidson and Clarksville first responders for helping to save a local woman who had collapsed on a neighborhood street.

Kelly Plummer, a 45-year-old North Clarksville woman, was walking her dogs Monday morning when she was stricken with respiratory failure and passed out, said her father, Tom Blanton.

Father says quick action saved his daughter’s life.

Father says quick action saved his daughter’s life.

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American Heart Association says Heart Disease and Stroke continue to take a toll on lives

 

Statement from Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO

Predicted trend in increased Holiday Deaths Occurs

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Reports of sudden, unexpected deaths linked to heart disease and stroke command our daily news headlines, but seemingly even more so in these past few weeks. The untimely loss of so many deeply saddens us.

And it’s troubling to know that even though we have made massive strides in research toward treatment and cure, needless suffering and death from heart disease and stroke persist.

Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading global cause of death. More than 17.3 million people die from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases around the world each year.

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an "ELECTRICAL" problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an “ELECTRICAL” problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

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Short episodes of Abnormal Heart Rhythm may not increase Risk of Stroke according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience only short episodes of an abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation have a very low risk of stroke, suggesting that anticoagulants in this group of patients were not likely to reduce the risk for stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common abnormal heart rhythm, affecting approximately 2.7 million Americans.

People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience short episodes an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation have no higher risk for stroke or other medical complications than people without documented atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience short episodes an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation have no higher risk for stroke or other medical complications than people without documented atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Women’s Heart Disease should be a Research Priority

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The latest gender-specific research on heart disease continues to show differences between women and men, yet gaps remain in how to best diagnose, treat and prevent this number one killer of women, according to studies published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

A portion of the March 2015 issue, published online ahead of print, is dedicated to research in women.

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

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Austin Peay State University Team Physician Cooper Beazley honored by Tennessee Board of Regents

 

APSU Sports Information

Austin Peay State University Sports - APSU - Governors - Lady GovsClarksville, TN -On May 20th, the Tennessee Board of Regents recognized Dr. Cooper Beazley’s unwavering support of Austin Peay State University over the years by presenting him with the 2014 Chancellor’s Award of Excellence in Philanthropy.

Former APSU President Tim Hall, who nominated Beazley for the award, said, “For almost three decades, this individual has dedicated his time and his own financial resources to helping the young student athletes at Austin Peay. He takes his oath as a doctor seriously, and he has worked tirelessly behind the scenes to keep these young men and women healthy. “

Austin Peay Team Physician Cooper Beazley honored by TBR. (Taylor Slifko/Austin Peay Public Relations)

Austin Peay Team Physician Cooper Beazley honored by TBR. (Taylor Slifko/Austin Peay Public Relations)

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Two Clarksville Police Officers honored with Lifesaver Awards

 

Clarksville Police Department - CPDClarksville, TN – On Friday, January 17th, 2014, two Officers from the Clarksville Police Department were presented with Lifesaver Awards.

Both Officer Heather Hill and Officer Alex Koziol went above and beyond their line of duty to safe a life. They are a credit to their shift, the Clarksville Police Department, and the City of Clarksville.

Clarksville Police Officer Heather Hill (left) and Officer Alex Koziol (right).

Clarksville Police Officer Heather Hill (left) and Officer Alex Koziol (right).

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American Heart Association says many sudden cardiac arrests preceded by warning signs

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Sudden cardiac arrest isn’t always so sudden, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

In a study of middle-age men in Portland, Oregon, more than half had possible warning signs up to a month before their hearts stopped abruptly.

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart stops due to a failure in its electrical system. Patients can sometimes survive if they receive CPR immediately and a defibrillator is used quickly to shock the heart into a normal rhythm.

Cardiac arrest warning signs information. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says new Implanted Defibrillator works well without touching Heart

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new type of defibrillator implanted under the skin can detect dangerously abnormal heart rhythms and deliver shocks to restore a normal heartbeat without wires touching the heart, according to research in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation.

The subcutaneous implantable cardiac defibrillator (S-ICD®System) includes a lead placed under the skin along the left side of the breast bone. Traditional implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) include electrical conducting wires inserted into blood vessels that touch the heart.

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Olympic gold medal swimmer and heart survivor Dana Vollmer to speak at Go Red For Women Luncheon April 12th

 

Go Red for Women - American Red CrossNashville, TN – Olympic gold medal swimmer and heart survivor Dana Vollmer will be the keynote speaker at this year’s 10th Anniversary Go Red For Women Luncheon, to be held April 12th at Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center.

Vollmer had to overcome a potentially serious heart condition as a child, a disorder of the heart’s electrical activity, which had her mother accompanying her to swim meets armed with a defibrillator in case she went into cardiac arrest.

Olympic gold medal swimmer Dana Vollmer. (Photo by Mike Comer/ProSwim Visuals)

Olympic gold medal swimmer Dana Vollmer. (Photo by Mike Comer/ProSwim Visuals)

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