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Topic: Drought

Hot, dry weather increases Fire Hazards, Clarksville Mayor Joe Pitts urges residents to heed open burning regulations

 

City of ClarksvilleClarksville, TN – Amid ongoing hot and dry weather, Clarksville Mayor Joe Pitts is urging residents to use caution with outdoor fires and to comply with the City’s open burning ordinance.

The National Weather Service forecast says hot and dry weather will continue through the weekend with drought conditions and fire danger increasing. Monday will offer a slight chance for showers, but only light rainfall amounts are expected. Warm and dry weather is expected for the rest of next week.

Fire Image

Photo by Jen Theodore

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NASA Satellite data reveals Amazon Rainforest Drought has long lasting effect

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – A single season of drought in the Amazon rainforest can reduce the forest’s carbon dioxide absorption for years after the rains return, according to a new study published in the journal Nature. This is the first study to quantify the long-term legacy of an Amazon drought.

A research team from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and other institutions used satellite lidar data to map tree damage and mortality caused by a severe drought in 2005. In years of normal weather, the undisturbed forest can be a natural carbon “sink,” absorbing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than it puts back into it.

This image, taken during a September 2010 drought, shows a line of dead and damaged trees after a surface fire in the Amazon rainforest in western Brazil. When dryer-than-normal conditions exist, fires from the open edges encroach on the forests and burn dry and stressed trees. Under normal conditions, when the rainforests are wetter, this is far less common. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image, taken during a September 2010 drought, shows a line of dead and damaged trees after a surface fire in the Amazon rainforest in western Brazil. When dryer-than-normal conditions exist, fires from the open edges encroach on the forests and burn dry and stressed trees. Under normal conditions, when the rainforests are wetter, this is far less common. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s ECOSTRESS instrument on International Space Station to study Plant Water usage

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Doctors learn a lot about their patients’ health by taking their temperature. An elevated temperature, or fever, can be a sign of illness. The same goes for plants, but their temperatures on a global scale are harder to measure than the temperatures of individual people.

That’s about to change, thanks to a new NASA instrument that soon will be installed on the International Space Station called ECOSTRESS, or ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station. ECOSTRESS will measure the temperature of plants from space. This will enable researchers to determine plant water use and to study how drought conditions affect plant health.

ECOSTRESS will measure the temperature of plants from space. Scientists will be able to use that temperature data to better understand how much water plants need and how they respond to water shortages. (USDA)

ECOSTRESS will measure the temperature of plants from space. Scientists will be able to use that temperature data to better understand how much water plants need and how they respond to water shortages. (USDA)

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NASA researchers construct 3D View of Amazon Forests to study El Niño Drought effects

 

Written by Ellen Gray
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Three-dimensional measurements of the central Brazilian Amazon rainforest have given NASA researchers a detailed window into the high number of branch falls and tree mortality that occur in response to drought conditions.

They found that 65 percent more trees and large branches died due to an El Niño-driven drought in 2015-2016 than compared to an average year. Understanding the effects of prolonged drought gives scientists a better sense of what may happen to carbon stored in tropical forests if these events become more common in the future.

The research team lays out a transect tape along which they measured the amount and location of woody debris on the forest floor, Tapajós National Forest, Brazil. (NASA/Veronika Leitold)

The research team lays out a transect tape along which they measured the amount and location of woody debris on the forest floor, Tapajós National Forest, Brazil. (NASA/Veronika Leitold)

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NASA study shows Loss of Water in Sierras caused Mountain Range to grow taller

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Loss of water from the rocks of California’s Sierra Nevada caused the mountain range to rise nearly an inch (24 millimeters) in height during the drought years from October 2011 to October 2015, a new NASA study finds.

In the two following years of more abundant snow and rainfall, the mountains have regained about half as much water in the rock as they had lost in the preceding drought and have fallen about half an inch (12 millimeters) in height.

“This suggests that the solid Earth has a greater capacity to store water than previously thought,” said research scientist Donald Argus of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, who led the study.

The Sierra Nevada range rose almost an inch during California's recent drought due to loss of water from within fractured rocks. (trailkrum, CC-BY-2.0)

The Sierra Nevada range rose almost an inch during California’s recent drought due to loss of water from within fractured rocks. (trailkrum, CC-BY-2.0)

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NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite data reveals reasons for Earth’s Carbon Dioxide Rise

 

Written by Dwayne Brown
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – A new NASA study provides space-based evidence that Earth’s tropical regions were the cause of the largest annual increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration seen in at least 2,000 years.

Scientists suspected the 2015-16 El Nino — one of the largest on record — was responsible, but exactly how has been a subject of ongoing research. Analyzing the first 28 months of data from NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite, researchers conclude impacts of El Nino-related heat and drought occurring in tropical regions of South America, Africa and Indonesia were responsible for the record spike in global carbon dioxide.

The last El Nino in 2015-16 impacted the amount of carbon dioxide that Earth's tropical regions released into the atmosphere, leading to Earth's recent record spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide. The effects of the El Nino were different in each region. (NASA-JPL/Caltech)

The last El Nino in 2015-16 impacted the amount of carbon dioxide that Earth’s tropical regions released into the atmosphere, leading to Earth’s recent record spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide. The effects of the El Nino were different in each region. (NASA-JPL/Caltech)

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NASA says Land is taking longer to recover from Drought

 

Written by Andrew Good
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – As global temperatures continue to rise, droughts are expected to become more frequent and severe in many regions during this century.

A new study with NASA participation finds that land ecosystems took progressively longer to recover from droughts in the 20th century, and incomplete drought recovery may become the new normal in some areas, possibly leading to tree death and increased emissions of greenhouse gases.

Global patterns of drought recovery time, in months. The longest recovery times are depicted in shades of blue and pink, with the shortest recovery times in yellow. White areas indicate water, barren lands, or regions that did not experience a drought during the study period. (Woods Hole Research Center)

Global patterns of drought recovery time, in months. The longest recovery times are depicted in shades of blue and pink, with the shortest recovery times in yellow. White areas indicate water, barren lands, or regions that did not experience a drought during the study period. (Woods Hole Research Center)

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Dakota Tucker of Monteagle Arrested for Sequatchie County Wildfire

 

The Tennessee Department of AgricultureNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Crime Unit, along with authorities in Sequatchie County, have charged 24-year-old Dakota Ashton Tucker of Monteagle for deliberately setting a fire that burned 65 acres.

Tucker is now charged with setting fire to personal property or land for the fire that occurred November 14th near Sunshine Road in Sequatchie County. He is currently being held in the Grundy County jail. Additional charges against Tucker are pending.

Dakota Ashton Tucker has been arrested for setting fire that burned 65 acres in Sequatchie County.

Dakota Ashton Tucker has been arrested for setting fire that burned 65 acres in Sequatchie County.

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TWRA asks Sportsmen to follow Burn Bans Issued for Specified Counties

 

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency - TWRANashville, TN – Because the drought in Tennessee has heightened concerns about accidental fires, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has asked sportsmen to follow burn bans issued in specified counties across the state.

“We want to work with local officials who are worried about dry conditions caused by Tennessee’s drought,” noted Ed Carter, the executive director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. “We are requesting that our sportsmen refrain from building campfires on all WMAs, but it is required in counties with burn bans.”

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal Reminds Tennesseans of Danger Posed by Dry Weather

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – With dry conditions, low water levels, and little to no precipitation forecast throughout most of Tennessee for the foreseeable future, the State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) reminds Tennesseans to make fire prevention and fire safety a top priority this fall. 

“Drought conditions are increasing the threat of wildfires in Tennessee counties, specifically those in the eastern portion of the state,” said State Fire Marshal and Commerce & Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak. “We urge Tennesseans to heed any burn bans currently activated in their community. By employing just a few basic fire safety precautions, the public can help prevent the devastating loss of life and property.”

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