Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Gulf of California

NASA uncovers evidence that Southern California fault connects to fault in Mexico

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – A multiyear study has uncovered evidence that a 21-mile-long (34-kilometer-long) section of a fault links known, longer faults in southern California and northern Mexico into a much longer continuous system. The entire system is at least 217 miles (350 kilometers) long.

Knowing how faults are connected helps scientists understand how stress transfers between faults. Ultimately, this helps researchers understand whether an earthquake on one section of a fault would rupture multiple fault sections, resulting in a much larger earthquake.

The approximate location of the newly mapped Ocotillo section, which ties together California's Elsinore fault and Mexico's Laguna Salada fault into one continuous fault system. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The approximate location of the newly mapped Ocotillo section, which ties together California’s Elsinore fault and Mexico’s Laguna Salada fault into one continuous fault system. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA works with NOAA to better detect Monsoon Flash Floods using GPS Sensors

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – In the American Southwest and in northwestern Mexico, more than half the annual rainfall often comes in the form of the torrential and unpredictable downpours of the North American monsoon. As in monsoon seasons across the tropics, a summertime reversal of winds carries streams of moisture from over the oceans or, in this case, the Gulf of California and Gulf of Mexico, and unceremoniously dumps them on the sunbaked land.

Perhaps the least understood and most erratic weather pattern in the United States, the monsoon brings precipitation that is vital to agriculture and the ecosystem, but it also presents serious threats to life, limb, and property.

North American monsoons can be unpredictable, erratic and bring severe flash flooding to dry, sunbaked areas. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

North American monsoons can be unpredictable, erratic and bring severe flash flooding to dry, sunbaked areas. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA study shows Baja Earthquake caused quiet motion in Southern California faults

 

Written
by Alan Buis

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new NASA study finds that a major 2010 earthquake in northern Mexico triggered quiet, non-shaking motions on several Southern California faults that released as much energy as a magnitude 4.9 to 5.3 earthquake.

The quiet motion associated with the widely felt, magnitude 7.2 earthquake centered in northern Baja California in Mexico, in April 2010 was discovered in before-and-after radar images of the region made by a NASA airborne instrument that produces extremely accurate maps of Earth motions.

UAVSAR measurements north of the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, which scientists have learned was followed by quiet movement on faults in California. Inset map shows the region on the California-Mexico border. (NASA/JPL/USGS/California Geological Survey/Google)

UAVSAR measurements north of the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, which scientists have learned was followed by quiet movement on faults in California. Inset map shows the region on the California-Mexico border. (NASA/JPL/USGS/California Geological Survey/Google)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


NASA creates 3D Image of Los Angeles Earthquake Zone

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – On March 28th, residents of Greater Los Angeles experienced the largest earthquake to strike the region since 2008. The magnitude 5.1 quake was centered near La Habra in northwestern Orange County about 21 miles (33 kilometers) east-southeast of Los Angeles, and was widely felt throughout Southern California.

There have been hundreds of aftershocks, including one of magnitude 4.1.

JPL scientists modeled the March 28, 2014 magnitude 5.1 quake near Los Angeles based on USGS seismic data. This model image shows how the quake may appear to airborne radar, such as NASA's UAVSAR, which will survey the area soon. Blue shades indicate the greatest surface displacement. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Google Earth)

JPL scientists modeled the March 28, 2014 magnitude 5.1 quake near Los Angeles based on USGS seismic data. This model image shows how the quake may appear to airborne radar, such as NASA’s UAVSAR, which will survey the area soon. Blue shades indicate the greatest surface displacement. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Google Earth)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Now playing at the Movies