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Topic: Harvard University

Leading Through Black Excellence APSU: Dr. Gail Robinson-Oturu

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Dr. Gail M. Robinson-Oturu, professor of voice at Austin Peay State University, has a distinguished record as an educator, performing artist, and scholar. As a singer, her soprano voice has been heard on local, regional, national, and international stages.

Dr. Gail Robinson-Oturu. (APSU)

Dr. Gail Robinson-Oturu. (APSU)

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Congress, get this deal done

 

The White HouseWashington, D.C. – The Senate passed funding yesterday to replenish President Donald Trump’s Paycheck Protection Program, which offers forgivable loans to small businesses fighting to survive during the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic.
 
“My administration has worked aggressively with Congress to negotiate this critical $428 billion funding package,” President Donald Trump said last night.

The White House - West Wing. (Official White House Photo) «Read the rest of this article»

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Majority Of Americans Disapprove Of News Media Handling Of Wuhan Coronavirus according to Gallup Poll

 

The White HouseWashington, D.C. – “Of nine leaders and institutions rated by Americans in a new poll on their response to the novel Wuhan Coronavirus, the media fared the worst, and it’s not even close,” Tristan Justice reports for The Federalist.
 
“According to a new Gallup poll released Wednesday, March 25th, 2020, the media was the only institution that scored a negative approval rating among the public with only 44 percent of Americans approving of the way the media has covered the virus.” 

The White House - West Wing. (Official White House Photo) «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA scientists study Aerogel for building habitats on Mars

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The Red Planet is an inhospitable world. NASA says growing crops on Mars is far easier in science fiction than it will be in reality. Among other challenges, subzero temperatures mean water can persist on the surface only as ice, and the planet’s atmosphere offers little protection to plants (or people) from the Sun’s radiation.

Raising crops on Mars is far easier in science fiction than it will be in real life: The Red Planet is an inhospitable world. Among other challenges, subzero temperatures mean water can persist on the surface only as ice, and the planet’s atmosphere offers little protection to plants (or people) from the Sun’s radiation.

Scientists are exploring how aerogel, a translucent, Styrofoam-like material, could be used as a building material on Mars. Aerogel retains heat; structures built with it could raise temperatures enough to melt water ice on the Martian surface. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Scientists are exploring how aerogel, a translucent, Styrofoam-like material, could be used as a building material on Mars. Aerogel retains heat; structures built with it could raise temperatures enough to melt water ice on the Martian surface. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Clarksville’s Charlie Koon takes part in U.S. Army War College’s National Security Seminar

 

U.S. Army War CollegeCarlisle Barracks, PA –  On June 3rd through June 6th, 2019, Charlie Koon of Clarksville, Tennessee participated in the U.S. Army War College 65th annual National Security Seminar (NSS) in Carlisle, PA. 
 
Koon was one of 160 business, government, academic and community leaders selected from across the country to take part in the week long academic seminar alongside the students of the Army War College. During the special academic event, Koon represented fellow American citizens in discussions with the next generation of senior leaders of the U.S. Armed Forces.

Charlie Koon of Clarksville, Tennessee (1st row, 4nd from left) joined the U.S. Army War College student body for the National Security Seminar (NSS), June 3rd-6th, 2019. Selected representatives from across the United States were invited to join the graduate-level seminar and exchange thoughts about national security topics in the capstone phase of the USAWC graduate program.

Charlie Koon of Clarksville, Tennessee (1st row, 4nd from left) joined the U.S. Army War College student body for the National Security Seminar (NSS), June 3rd-6th, 2019. Selected representatives from across the United States were invited to join the graduate-level seminar and exchange thoughts about national security topics in the capstone phase of the USAWC graduate program.

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Clarksville Chamber Power Breakfast keynote speaker will be Atlanta FED President Raphael Bostic

 

Clarksville Area Chamber of CommerceClarksville, TN – The Clarksville Area Chamber of Commerce Power Breakfest will feature Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta President, Raphael Bostic, as keynote speaker on July 18th, 2019.

Brought to you by the Austin Peay State University College of Business, President Bostic will discuss the national economy, the Federal Reserve’s responsibilities and his observations of the varying economic realities facing people in the Sixth district. Audience Q&A will follow.

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta President Raphael Bostic.

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta President Raphael Bostic.

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Sections: Business | No Comments
 

NASA’s Juno spacecraft discovers Changes in Magnetic Field of Jupiter

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The first definitive detection beyond our world of an internal magnetic field that changes over time was detected during NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter. It’s a phenomenon called secular variation. The gas giant’s secular variation is most likely driven by the planet’s deep atmospheric winds, Juno determined.

The discovery will help scientists further understand Jupiter’s interior structure – including atmospheric dynamics – as well as changes in Earth’s magnetic field. A paper on the discovery was published today in the journal Nature Astronomy.

This still from an animation illustrates Jupiter's magnetic field at a single moment in time. The Great Blue Spot, an-invisible-to-the-eye concentration of magnetic field near the equator, stands out as a particularly strong feature. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Harvard/Moore et al.)

This still from an animation illustrates Jupiter’s magnetic field at a single moment in time. The Great Blue Spot, an-invisible-to-the-eye concentration of magnetic field near the equator, stands out as a particularly strong feature. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Harvard/Moore et al.)

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NASA’s Dawn mission study shows Dwarf Planet Ceres could have had an Ocean

 

Written by Elyssia Widjaja
NASA-Jet Propulsion Laboratory News Office

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Minerals containing water are widespread on Ceres, suggesting the dwarf planet may have had a global ocean in the past. What became of that ocean? Could Ceres still have liquid today? Two new studies from NASA’s Dawn mission shed light on these questions.

The Dawn team found that Ceres’ crust is a mixture of ice, salts and hydrated materials that were subjected to past and possibly recent geologic activity, and that this crust represents most of that ancient ocean.

This photo shows dwarf planet Ceres as seen by NASA's Dawn. The map overlaid at right gives scientists hints about Ceres' internal structure from gravity measurements. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

This photo shows dwarf planet Ceres as seen by NASA’s Dawn. The map overlaid at right gives scientists hints about Ceres’ internal structure from gravity measurements. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

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NASA and NOAA study shows warmer weather increasing Carbon Emissions from Alaska Tundra

 

Written by Ellen Gray
NASA Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Warmer temperatures and thawing soils may be driving an increase in emissions of carbon dioxide from Alaskan tundra to the atmosphere, particularly during the early winter, according to a new study supported by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

More carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere will accelerate climate warming, which, in turn, could lead to the release of even more carbon dioxide from these soils.

A new paper led by Roisin Commane, an atmospheric researcher at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, finds the amount of carbon dioxide emitted from northern tundra areas between October and December each year has increased 70 percent since 1975.

Winter sun setting over the tundra polygons in northern Alaska in November 2015. As winter sets in and snow settles, the soils take time to freeze completely and continue to emit carbon dioxide long into the new year. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Charles Miller)

Winter sun setting over the tundra polygons in northern Alaska in November 2015. As winter sets in and snow settles, the soils take time to freeze completely and continue to emit carbon dioxide long into the new year. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Charles Miller)

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NASA Study suggests decreased Hydroxyl levels maybe the cause of recent Methane increases

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new NASA- and the U.S. Department of Energy-funded study finds that recent increases in global methane levels observed since 2007 are not necessarily due to increasing emissions, but instead may be due to changes in how long methane remains in the atmosphere after it is emitted.

The second most important human-produced greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, methane is colorless, odorless and can be hard to track. The gas has a wide range of sources, from decomposing biological material to leaks in natural gas pipelines.

Rice paddy fields in India. Agriculture is one source of global methane emissions. (Flickr user sandeepachetan.com travel (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

Rice paddy fields in India. Agriculture is one source of global methane emissions. (Flickr user sandeepachetan.com travel (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

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