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Topic: National Institute on Aging

American Heart Association says Irregular Heart Rhythm may affect Walking and Strength in older Adults

 

Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When older people develop atrial fibrillation — the most common type of irregular heartbeat — it accelerates age-related declines in walking speed, strength, balance and other aspects of physical performance, according to new research in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, an American Heart Association journal.

“Particularly in older adults, we need to be mindful that the effects of atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) go beyond increasing the risk of heart failure and stroke. We learned from this study that older adults with AFib are especially vulnerable to losing strength, balance, gait speed and coordination,” said Jared W. Magnani, M.D., Ms.C., lead author of the study and assistant professor of medicine at Boston University.

When people over age 70 develop atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat, it accelerates age-related declines in walking speed, strength, balance and other aspects of physical performance. (American Heart Association)

When people over age 70 develop atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat, it accelerates age-related declines in walking speed, strength, balance and other aspects of physical performance. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Older Adults with limited mobility may lessen Heart Problems with Activity

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Older adults with limited mobility may lower their risk of heart attack and coronary death for every minute of physical activity, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Reducing time spent being sedentary even by engaging in low-intensity activities could have important cardiovascular benefits for older adults with mobility limitations,” said Thomas W. Buford, Ph.D., senior author of the study and director of the Health Promotion Center of the University of Florida Institute on Aging in Gainesville, Florida.

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Women want Doctors’ help in facing fears about Sex after Heart Attack

 

Despite fears of another heart attack or dying, many started having sex within a month after their heart attack.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women think it would be easier to overcome their fears of sex after having a heart attack if their doctors gave them more information, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Most women don’t have discussions with their doctors about resuming sex after a heart attack even though many experience fear or other sexual problems,” said Emily M. Abramsohn, M.P.H., the study’s lead author and a researcher at the University of Chicago. “We wanted to get a better understanding of women’s sexual recovery and how it could be improved.” «Read the rest of this article»

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Weight loss and increased fitness slow decline of mobility in adults

 

NIH-funded research could lead to lower health care costs for adults with type 2 diabetes

National Institutes of Health LogoWashington, D.C. – Weight loss and increased physical fitness nearly halved the risk of losing mobility in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes, according to four-year results from the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. The results are published in the March 29, 2012, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Being able to perform routine activities is an important contributor to quality of life,” said Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D., director of the NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), which led the study. “These findings add support to making lifestyle changes that improve health and reduce disability in people with type 2 diabetes, changes that already have been shown to prevent the disease and provide a good return on investment.”

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Improved Living Environments Can Reduce Health Problems for Women and Children

 

Study finds moving to lower poverty neighborhoods decreases risk of obesity and diabetes

The National Science FoundationWashington, D.C. – Low-income women with children who moved from high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhoods experienced notable long-term improvements in aspects of their health; namely, reductions in diabetes and extreme obesity, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Chicago and partner institutions.

The New England Journal of Medicine published the study in a special article today, “Neighborhoods, Obesity and Diabetes – A Randomized Social Experiment.” Lead author for the collaboration was Jens Ludwig, the McCormick Foundation Professor of Social Service Administration, Law and Public Policy at University of Chicago

Research shows how basic social and economic science research can contribute to improving the health of women and children in major U.S. cities. (©2011 Jupiter Images Corporation)

Research shows how basic social and economic science research can contribute to improving the health of women and children in major U.S. cities. (©2011 Jupiter Images Corporation)

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