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Topic: Physical Activity

American Heart Association says Maintaining Weight Loss beneficial for people with Type 2 Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association people with Type 2 diabetes who regained weight forfeited the initial benefits of reduced risk of heart disease or stroke compared to those who maintained their weight loss.

Regaining weight previously lost is common and can deteriorate the initial benefits of lowered heart disease or stroke risks.

Keeping off at least 75% of lost weight sustained or improved the initial benefits. (American Heart Association)

Keeping off at least 75% of lost weight sustained or improved the initial benefits. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Dog Ownership associated with Longer Life, especially among Heart Attack, Stroke Survivors

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to a new study and a separate meta-analysis published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a journal of the American Heart Association, Dog ownership may be associated with longer life and better cardiovascular outcomes, especially for heart attack and stroke survivors who live alone.

Dog ownership was associated with a 33% lower risk of death for heart attack survivors living alone and 27% reduced risk of death for stroke survivors living alone, compared to people who did not own a dog. (American Heart Association)

Dog ownership was associated with a 33% lower risk of death for heart attack survivors living alone and 27% reduced risk of death for stroke survivors living alone, compared to people who did not own a dog. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports U.S. Soldiers have worse Heart Health than Civilians

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, active duty Army personnel have worse cardiovascular health compared to people of similar ages in the civilian population.

Researchers compared a group of more than 263,000 active duty Army soldiers, age 17-64, who had a health examination in 2012 with a similar group of U.S. civilians participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2011-2012.

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says New Pediatric Blood Pressure guidelines identify more Kids at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension new guidelines that classified more children as having elevated blood pressure  are better at predicting which kids are likely to develop heart disease when they reach adulthood.

The guidelines were issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2017 and endorsed by the American Heart Association.

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Sleepiness common among Black Women, may be linked to High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationChicago, IL – Poor sleep habits may be related to low levels of physical activity, high blood pressure and obesity among black women, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Joint Hypertension 2018 Scientific Sessions, an annual conference focused on recent advances in hypertension research.

In a study with black women who are overweight or obese, nearly half reported sleeping less than 7 hours at night, and many also reported daytime sleepiness. (American Heart Association)

In a study with black women who are overweight or obese, nearly half reported sleeping less than 7 hours at night, and many also reported daytime sleepiness. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says new physical activity findings on physical activity alarming

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on the World Health Organization (WHO)’s findings of insufficient physical activity in the world’s adult population.

According to the study, 40 percent of adults in the United States do not get the recommended amount of physical activity.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

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American Heart Association says Older Adults who get physical can lower their Heart Disease Risk

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in light to vigorous physical activity, benefit with healthier levels of heart and vessel disease markers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The results from increased physical activity were found to be particularly good among women.

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. (American Heart Association)

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. (American Heart Association)

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More Physical Activity and Higher Intensity Physical Activity may significantly reduce Risk of Death in Older Women in the short term

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More physical activity and at higher intensities could lead to a big drop in the risk of death in older women from any cause, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers found the volume of light intensity physical activity or sedentary behavior was not associated with death rate. However, light intensity activity may be beneficial for other health outcomes not studied in this research.

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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Clarksville applauded by Governor Bill Haslam as Healthier Tennessee Community

 

City leads community wide effort to improve health, fitness

City of Clarksville - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – Clarksville Mayor Kim McMillan and members of Healthy Clarksville were applauded Tuesday morning by Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam for making Clarksville a Healthier Tennessee Community.

The Governor’s Foundation for Health and Wellness hosted a breakfast and awards ceremony at Waller Law in Nashville to honor Clarksville and eight other communities that have earned the designation.

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam presents a plaque to Clarkville Mayor Kim McMillan and members of the Mayor’s Fitness Council/Healthy Clarksville designating Clarksville as a Healthier Tennessee Community.

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam presents a plaque to Clarkville Mayor Kim McMillan and members of the Mayor’s Fitness Council/Healthy Clarksville designating Clarksville as a Healthier Tennessee Community.

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