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Topic: plants

Austin Peay State University to hold plant sale from campus’ native meadow this spring

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – For years, the area behind Ellington Hall was considered one of the least attractive spots on the Austin Peay State University (APSU) campus. The land, surrounded by sidewalks and abutting loading zones and parking lots, sloped downward into a wide, unsightly bowl that flooded during heavy rains.

The campus of Austin Peay State University. (APSU)

The campus of Austin Peay State University. (APSU)

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NASA says Growing Plants on International Space Station has applications on Earth

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA states that understanding the effects of gravity on plant life is essential in preparing for human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit.

The ability to produce high-energy, low-mass food sources during spaceflight will enable the maintenance of crew health during long-duration missions while having a reduced impact on resources necessary for long-distance travel.

Interior view of the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) experiment plant growth chamber showing the emergence of mustard seedlings. (NASA)

Interior view of the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) experiment plant growth chamber showing the emergence of mustard seedlings. (NASA)

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NASA scientists study Aerogel for building habitats on Mars

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The Red Planet is an inhospitable world. NASA says growing crops on Mars is far easier in science fiction than it will be in reality. Among other challenges, subzero temperatures mean water can persist on the surface only as ice, and the planet’s atmosphere offers little protection to plants (or people) from the Sun’s radiation.

Raising crops on Mars is far easier in science fiction than it will be in real life: The Red Planet is an inhospitable world. Among other challenges, subzero temperatures mean water can persist on the surface only as ice, and the planet’s atmosphere offers little protection to plants (or people) from the Sun’s radiation.

Scientists are exploring how aerogel, a translucent, Styrofoam-like material, could be used as a building material on Mars. Aerogel retains heat; structures built with it could raise temperatures enough to melt water ice on the Martian surface. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Scientists are exploring how aerogel, a translucent, Styrofoam-like material, could be used as a building material on Mars. Aerogel retains heat; structures built with it could raise temperatures enough to melt water ice on the Martian surface. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory 3 (OCO-3) will study plant growth

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says when plants take in too much energy, they don’t get fat – they lighten up. They absorb more sunlight than they need to power photosynthesis, and they get rid of the excess solar energy by emitting it as a very faint glow.

The light is far too dim for us to notice under normal circumstances, but it can be measured with a spectrometer. Called solar-induced fluorescence (SIF), it’s the most accurate signal of photosynthesis that can be observed from space.

That’s important because, as Earth’s climate changes, growing seasons worldwide are also changing in both timing and length.

This honeysuckle is glowing in response to a high-energy ultraviolet light rather than to the Sun, but its shine is similar to the solar-induced fluorescence that OCO-3 will measure. (©Craig P. Burrows)

This honeysuckle is glowing in response to a high-energy ultraviolet light rather than to the Sun, but its shine is similar to the solar-induced fluorescence that OCO-3 will measure. (©Craig P. Burrows)

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NASA’s ECOSTRESS instrument on International Space Station to study Plant Water usage

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Doctors learn a lot about their patients’ health by taking their temperature. An elevated temperature, or fever, can be a sign of illness. The same goes for plants, but their temperatures on a global scale are harder to measure than the temperatures of individual people.

That’s about to change, thanks to a new NASA instrument that soon will be installed on the International Space Station called ECOSTRESS, or ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station. ECOSTRESS will measure the temperature of plants from space. This will enable researchers to determine plant water use and to study how drought conditions affect plant health.

ECOSTRESS will measure the temperature of plants from space. Scientists will be able to use that temperature data to better understand how much water plants need and how they respond to water shortages. (USDA)

ECOSTRESS will measure the temperature of plants from space. Scientists will be able to use that temperature data to better understand how much water plants need and how they respond to water shortages. (USDA)

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Mono-unsaturated fats from plants, not animals may reduce risk of death from heart disease and other causes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Diets rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids from plants were associated with a lower risk of dying from heart disease or other causes compared to diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from animals, which were linked to a higher risk of death from heart disease or other causes, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Agriculture says Buy Locally Grown Flower and Vegetable Plants With Confidence

 

Tennessee Department of AgricultureNashville, TN – Are you a gardener gearing up for the growing season? Local farmers markets, on-farm greenhouses, and retail garden centers are filling with gorgeous flowers and vegetable plants that promise bountiful harvests.

Experienced plant lovers know that sometimes plants can look beautiful in the store, but will soon wilt once planted. Worse, they can bring bugs and blights into your home.

For confidence in the plants you buy, buy Tennessee grown plants first.

For confidence in the plants you buy, buy Tennessee grown plants first.

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NASA studies Mustard Seedlings roots in microgravity environment on International Space Station

 

Written by Morgan McAllister
NASA’s Johnson Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – When plants on Earth search for nutrients and water, what drives their direction? Very simply, gravitational force helps them find the easiest path to the substances they need to grow and thrive. What happens if gravity is no longer part of the equation?

Botanists from Ohio Weslyan University leverage the microgravity environment of the International Space Station to study root growth behaviors and sensory systems in an investigation known as Gravity Perception Systems (Plant Gravity Perception).

Seeds are aligned along a membrane within the cassette and germinated before their exposure to simulated gravity within the EMCS. (NASA)

Seeds are aligned along a membrane within the cassette and germinated before their exposure to simulated gravity within the EMCS. (NASA)

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NASA Satellites observe Plant Life on Earth’s Land and Oceans

 

Written by Lacey Young
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Life. It’s the one thing that, so far, makes Earth unique among the thousands of other planets we’ve discovered. Since the fall of 1997, NASA satellites have continuously and globally observed all plant life at the surface of the land and ocean.

During the week of November 13th-17th, NASA is sharing stories and videos about how this view of life from space is furthering knowledge of our home planet and the search for life on other worlds.

New NASA missions will study terrestrial vegetation, such as these trees along the Kuskokwim River near McGrath, Alaska. (NASA/Peter Griffith)

New NASA missions will study terrestrial vegetation, such as these trees along the Kuskokwim River near McGrath, Alaska. (NASA/Peter Griffith)

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How Does Your Space Garden Grow?

 

Written by Linda Herridge and Amanda Griffin
NASA’s John F. Kennedy Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationFlorida – Early Friday morning, astronauts onboard the International Space Station were busy at work, harvesting three varieties of leafy greens from the Veggie growth chamber and installing the next generation of plant research – the high-tech Advanced Plant Habitat.

The Veggie plant growth team kicked it up a notch with their sixth round of crops grown aboard the International Space Station with experiment VEG-03D. For the first time, three different plant varieties are simultaneously growing in the Veggie chamber.

Three different varieties of plants growing in the Veggie plant growth chamber on the International Space Station were harvested this morning. (NASA/ISS)

Three different varieties of plants growing in the Veggie plant growth chamber on the International Space Station were harvested this morning. (NASA/ISS)

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