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Topic: Protein

FDA Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: July 1st, 2020

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Silver Spring, MDThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today continued to take action in the ongoing response to the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic:

Today, FDA took action to help facilitate the timely development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent COVID-19 Coronavirus by providing guidance with recommendations related to licensure for those developing COVID-19 Coronavirus vaccines.

Coronavirus

Coronavirus

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BACH Dietitians launch Nutrition Mini-Series for beneficiaries Sheltering at Home

 

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Public Affairs

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH)Fort Campbell, KY – The Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH) Nutrition Care Division representatives launched a four part mini-series to discuss basic nutrition and hydration, nutrition and immunity, fueling for fitness, and dietary supplements. The first segment is about seven minutes long and can be found on the Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/BACH.FortCampbell

“There are a lot of factors that contribute to a Soldier’s overall readiness and nutrition is certainly one of them. We wanted to produce the series to continue to educate about nutrition and the different topics that relate to Soldiers and beneficiaries across the military health system,”said 2nd Lt. Jason Nepa, an Army dietitian at BACH.

U.S. Army Dietitian Capt. Erica Jarmer, from Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, kicks off a four-part nutrition mini-series Wednesday, May 20th to reach Soldiers and other beneficiaries stuck at home learn about nutrition basics. Since they can’t hold face-to-face nutrition classes on Fort Campbell due to the current pandemic, Jarmer and U.S. Army Dietitian 2nd Lt. Jason Nepa will travel the information super highway to reach you. (U.S. Army photo by Maria Yager)

U.S. Army Dietitian Capt. Erica Jarmer, from Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, kicks off a four-part nutrition mini-series Wednesday, May 20th to reach Soldiers and other beneficiaries stuck at home learn about nutrition basics. Since they can’t hold face-to-face nutrition classes on Fort Campbell due to the current pandemic, Jarmer and U.S. Army Dietitian 2nd Lt. Jason Nepa will travel the information super highway to reach you. (U.S. Army photo by Maria Yager)

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First Detailed Analysis Of Immune Response To SARS-CoV-2 Bodes Well For COVID-19 Vaccine Development

 

La Jolla Institute for ImmunologyLa Jolla, CAScientists around the world are racing to develop a vaccine to protect against COVID-19 Coronavirus infection, and epidemiologists are trying to predict how the coronavirus pandemic will unfold until such a vaccine is available.

Yet, both efforts are surrounded by unresolved uncertainty whether the immune system can mount a substantial and lasting response to SARS-CoV-2 and whether exposure to circulating common cold coronaviruses provides any kind of protective immunity.

Study finds robust antiviral T cell response in humans with COVID-19 Coronavirus and detects substantial crossreactivity in unexposed individuals; in a piece of good news provides a benchmark for testing of vaccine candidates.

Study finds robust antiviral T cell response in humans with COVID-19 Coronavirus and detects substantial crossreactivity in unexposed individuals; in a piece of good news provides a benchmark for testing of vaccine candidates.

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American Heart Association says High Protein Diet associated with small increased Heart Failure Risk in Middle-Aged Men

 

Circulation: Heart Failure Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

Despite the popularity of high protein diets, there is little research about how diets high in protein might impact men’s heart failure risk.

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. (American Heart Association)

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association lists Top Heart Disease and Stroke Research advances of 2017

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New medicines to fight heart disease, updated guidelines for strokes and high blood pressure, and research into genome editing are among the top heart disease and stroke advances in 2017, according to the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke.

The Association, one of the top funders of heart- and stroke-related research worldwide, has been compiling an annual top 10 list of major advances in heart disease and stroke science since 1996. Here, in no particular order, are the organization’s picks for leading research accomplishments published in 2017.

American Heart Association identifies most impactful scientific discoveries for Heart Disease and Stroke. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association identifies most impactful scientific discoveries for Heart Disease and Stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Severe Pre-Eclampsia often leads to undetected High Blood Pressure after Pregnancy

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Lingering hypertension is common and may go unnoticed among women who have severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Pre-eclampsia, which is when a woman develops hypertension and elevated protein in the urine during pregnancy, occurs in three to five percent of pregnancies in the developed world. Recent studies have shown that women with pre-eclampsia are more likely than women with normal blood pressure during pregnancy to have high blood pressure post-pregnancy.

Hypertension commonly occurs in the year following pregnancy among women who had severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

Hypertension commonly occurs in the year following pregnancy among women who had severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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United States Army to issue PT bracelet with 24/7 fitness tracking, remote mentoring

 

U.S. Army Public Affairs

U.S. ArmyWashington, D.C. – U.S. Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field a personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers’ fitness in real time.

The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers’ activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. It also allows leaders to provide remote mentoring in real time, according to Dr. Duke McDirkington, the lead scientific advisor from the U.S. Army’s Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, or USARIEM, and the co-chair of the Army’s Physical Training Belt Task Force.

Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field this personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers' fitness in real time. The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers' activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. (U.S. Army)

Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field this personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers’ fitness in real time. The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers’ activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. (U.S. Army)

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American Heart Association reports FDA Expands Health Claim for More Fruits, Vegetables

 

American Heart Association Can Now Certify These Foods as Heart-Healthy

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released an interim final rule removing the low fat and positive nutrient requirements which will apply to nearly all fresh fruits and vegetables, allowing them to make a heart health claim and be eligible for food certification programs like the American Heart Association’s Heart-Check mark program.

The ruling was in response to a petition submitted by the Association in September 2012.

Farmers' market produce stand showing assorted fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

Farmers’ market produce stand showing assorted fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Agriculture says it’s time for Local Honey and Sorghum

 

The Tennessee Department of AgricultureNashville, TN – Autumn is generally regarded as a sweet season, the year’s peak harvest time. You could say Tennessee’s sweetest harvest is contained in the jars of honey and sorghum syrup now lining shelves at farms, orchards and farmers markets across the state.

Honey is often harvested twice per year, in spring and fall. Flavor is determined solely by the nectar source, giving some honeys stronger flavor than others. As a rule, the lighter the honey’s color the milder its flavor, but buying directly from the beekeeper is the best way to learn the characteristics of a particular honey.

Sorghum

Sorghum

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NASA reports Alzheimer’s disease research to be conducted on International Space Station

 

Written by Rachel Molina
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Alzheimer’s disease is a global problem. In the United States alone, more than 5 million people have the disease and a new diagnosis is made every 67 seconds—numbers that are just a fraction of worldwide totals. Among medical researchers, Alzheimer’s is a top priority.

Researchers working with astronauts on the International Space Station are embarking on a mission to discover the origin of Alzheimer’s. Although the details are still a little fuzzy, researchers believe that Alzheimer’s and similar diseases advance when certain proteins in the brain assemble themselves into long fibers that accumulate and ultimately strangle nerve cells in the brain.

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